26 block question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: 26 block question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:37 am:

I have this block I want to sell it is rebored 40 over and #4 was sleeved and includes New pistons [aluminum]40 over with grant rings
Question Is I haven't ever sold a block ,And will like to see What is a fair value [reserve] ,sos I can put it on E-bay
Thank you All Lorenzo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:58 am:

$125


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:58 am:

No crankshaft? What is the condition of the main bearings?

I've bought a couple of similar but complete short blocks on Ebay for $400 to $600.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 02:59 pm:

Thank you all , I will hold it ,not worth it to put it on e-bay. besides the pick up is way south

lorenzo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 04:47 pm:

Lorenzo,
A very good question was "what is the condition of the bearings?" It my be this is just a bare block that has been bored to fit the .040 pistons, and no bearing work has been done. With a good crank and bearings, the price will go up considerably. Go, no cracks '26 blocks are becoming a seldom-seen thing (I won't say rare, just "unusual"), so I would suspect the second opinion ($400+ USD) is probably more accurate than the first quote--especially on eBay. At a swap meet?? Two years ago I bought a '25 block with new bearings, reground crank, bored with aluminum pistons, rings, re-done rods & valves for $400, and it wasn't early in the day either---but I figure I got a great buy! Also, the previous owner was known for quality work, so that was a big plus in favoring my purchase.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 04:59 pm:

Lorenzo, It more than likely has the sleeve from crack issues that are common on 26-7 blocks. I do not see hardened seats? To fix the crack from cylinder to exhaust, normally has a sleeve and hardened seats to seal it up.My thought on price is around 400. US, the 26-7 blocks do have more issues than the earlier ones. I quit buying 26-7 blocks at auctions unless the head and side cover is off, been burned to to many times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 07:47 pm:

Joe the rear was sleeved because there was rust some water must have got in and it rusted the wall other cylinders where good but #4 was sleeved so it did not go to 60 over, Others had to math [no crack] ,I see no cracks and I magnify, The bearings do need to be done
and hard seats too for no lead gas I have 2- 26 coupes and 3 blocks ... Thank you all


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 08:23 pm:

Lorenzo, One place often overlooked on the 26-27 blocks for cracks, is the top of the valve spring galley just above the main bearing bolt. The top of the galley between #2 and #3 cylinder will sometimes have cracks. It appears to be a 26-27 casting/design issue. Im in the 300 to 400 dollar range as a guess for a 26 block with no cracks and needs the bearings done... If the valves seats look good and will grind and give a good seat with the valve face still above the deck height, there is no need for hard seats to run unleaded. They had unleaded gas in the day. They called it "ethyl" or premium. The only way I would put hard seats into a good useable valve area is if the car is going to be "run hard" such as sustained high speeds on the highway. Even then I would limit them to "exhaust only". But that is my opinion for what its worth. :-) :-) There are others who will probably disagree with me on the hard seat issue. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:08 pm:

I'll disagree on the Ethyl issue. :-) Tetraehtyl lead was introduced in the twenties, with the Ethyl corporation formed in 1924. It became the premium grade, used in higher-compression engines than the unleaded gas used in Model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 10:51 am:

That makes sence on the Tetra"ethyl". I knew "ethyl was the "premium" gas back then. But tetraethyl was also added to "regular" gas. I do not know when it started being added to regular, but it had a good effect on the valves "receeding" into the block. The lead was supposed to give a "cushion" effect to the valve faces when closing. I had always been taught in my years of working at oil refineries that tetraethyls main purpose in life, was to raise the octane. and do away with one trip thru the expensive "Cat Cracker" process of refining (save the refinery some money). When the refineries were made to stop using the tetraethyl lead in its refining process, they were forced to run the crude thru the "Cat Crackers" an extra time (cost more money). Then they started using "Alki units" to do the process of the first trip thru the "Cat Crackers". By using pure Alkali to do the first step of removing the impurities of the crude oil they can save the one trip thru the "cat crackers". The problem with the "alki units" is all the alkalie is not removed in the refining process. Some of it remains in the finished product. Alkalie will "attack" the carbon based gasoline and cause it to "spoil". The "Alkie units" are also very dangerous to work on. I quit working the refineries if they had "Alkie unit" work way back in the 1990s. On a final note.... I am not sure of this, but I thought that premium gas(ethyl) was ran thru the "cat crackers" twice and then the tetraethyl added to give a high octane. Regular gas was ran thru the "cat crackers" once and then tetraethyl was added to give a good (but lower than ethyl) octane rating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 06:48 pm:

The "cushion" story is an old wives tale. Perhaps it was easier to make up a story than to tell people why higher octane made valves last longer in engines that needed it.

Higher performance engines make better use of available fuel by developing more cylinder pressure. More cylinder pressure equals more power. To achieve more complete burning of the mixture, and to have the optimum efficiency, the mixture needs to be ignited as early as possible. We characterize this as spark advance, although like all conceptual thought this is an oversimplification in order for me to explain what higher octane does in the context of an engine.

Higher octane can be made using select distillates of petroleum. The catalytic cracking is how petroleum is distilled into iso octane. Iso Octane is the product used to compare octanes of other blends of chemicals. Octane "ratings" are a comparison of any gasoline's performance to the performance of Iso Octane.

Preignition, also called detonation or spark knock, is a symptom of uneven combustion. It is caused by not enough octane for the cylinder pressure / ignition cycle time. You can reduce preignition by reducing compression, reducing the amount of spark advance, or an increase in octane.

Tetra Ethyl Lead is a liquid that can be added to gasoline that mimics the effects and performance of iso octane. TEL allows the mixture to be ignited earlier and at a higher cylinder pressure without preignition. TEL reduces the temperature of the burning mixture which helps valve seat life.

TEL is a relatively cheap and very effective way to increase octane.

More octane speak:
http://chem.answers.com/chemistry-basics/iso-octane-its-importance-to-the-gasoli ne-industry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 08:07 pm:

Royce: I will neither agree or disagree with the "old wives tale" but your explanation does makes since. It is just what I have been taught and heard for years as to the "cushion" effect. As far as TEL helping with pre detonation, I agree with you. I just did not get into that point of discussion in my posting above. Thanks for bringing it up .. I believe it was also advertised as an "anti-knock" additive.


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