"Remember Pearl Harbor" 12/7/1941

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: "Remember Pearl Harbor" 12/7/1941
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 12:13 pm:

How many of you remember 12/7/1941 and where you were when you first heard of there attack? I was in my dad's 1938 Packard 8 and we were traveling down Snelling Ave. in St. Paul, MN. My father turned on the radio and heard the first reports of the Japan's navy and air force attack on the ships and planes in Hawaii. What is tragic is that our navy personal knew that there might be an attack soon and then grouped the ships in the harbor rather than out to sea. The local newspaper even had reference to that in that day's news. I have been at the memorial in the harbor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 12:24 pm:

I have to assume I spent most of the day in a crib. I was exactly six weeks old on December 7th. I was in North Carolina, where my dad had been sent 8-9 months earlier when he was recalled to active duty from the Army reserves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 12:36 pm:

I was 13 years away from conception (born 1954). I still have my father's Kaneohe Bay ID badge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 12:53 pm:

Me too John! Same year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 12:58 pm:

Feeling like a "youngster" here Tim. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Glowacki on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 01:20 pm:

My Dad was in a movie theater when the film stopped and the lights came on with an announcement about Pearl Harbor. He enlisted on December 10th.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 03:52 pm:

I'm told that my mother and I were brought home from the hospital on December 7th, 1941! And of course, the world has never been the same! I suppose I must admit however, that THAT probably had very little to do with me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 03:53 pm:

I guess you could say, I was justr a gleam in the ol man's eyes, as I did not arrive until 1944


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 03:59 pm:

I was peeing in a diaper. Just like now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 04:07 pm:

Steve - I can relate! You and I (and many others nowadays) have a lot to be thankful for! Not too many years ago, a prostate cancer diagnosis was a death sentence!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 04:15 pm:

Way before my time, but like Randy, my father was in a movie theater with his parents when they heard the announcement. He said that my grandfather wanted to go buy a paper to get more information. Daddy was just a kid, but my grandfather was still young enough to go off to war and did so with the Navy in the Pacific.

My wife's uncle (She was much closer to them than her parents) joined the Army the day after Pearl Harbor and landed on Omaha Beach June 6, 1944.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Goodheart on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 04:45 pm:

I was one year and 4 days old. I had an uncle who was at Pearl Harbor, he survived.
My Father was working in a lead and Zinc mine which they wanted to keep running to supply the military, so he did not go into the service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (AUS) on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 04:55 pm:

While helping my wife blow her long service leave money on an around the world trip several years ago, 3 places we visited brought tears to my eyes.
NYC's Ground Zero and the spot where Nelson fell were 2 of them and although I'd been there before, the USS Arizona memorial was the other.
I've sailed in and out of Pearl Harbor about a dozen times when I was a young sailor. Not bad considering I was in a foreign Navy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 05:18 pm:

I was born in 1943, July. I do remember VJ day in 1945. We all were out in the street in our neighborhood yelling screaming an horn honking. I'm sure I had no idea why but do remember the commotion.

I have visited the memorials in Honolulu both at the harbor and up on the hill behind the city where the entire theatre of operations is shown on marble walls. Standing on the memorial of the Arizona is awe inspiring.

just sayin'

brasscarguy

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Van Evera on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 05:34 pm:

Steve, you're a crack up!!!!
I've posted this picture before I think, but it sure bears re-posting on this thread:

USS St. Louis (light cruiser) steaming out to sea that morning getting ready to pass the USS California (which is "sunk" in the mud.) The St. Louis ("Lucky Lou") was the first capital ship out that morning.
My dad was on the St. Louis and my wife's dad was on the California. Both men survived and I came along three years after the signing of the peace accord in Tokyo Bay. My father-in-law was on a light cruiser that day in September and he always liked to say, "I was there when it began, and I was there when is ended


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson (AUS) on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 05:44 pm:

And where it ended


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 06:48 pm:

I was born in 1954 as well, so I do not remember the attack. However, I was lucky enough to visit Pearl Harbor and the Arizona memorial when it was just being completed in 1963. It was a quiet day in the harbor and the water was not as turbid as normal. I could see the twisted remains of the upper portion of the ship down below and the constant drops of oil that surfaced. It was a solemn and silent place permeated by the sadness that so many young, promising lives had been snuffed out in an instant and they were lying below.

Later that day we went up to the Punchbowl cemetery, and my Dad went looking for (and found) some of the graves of his friends from Americal's actions on Guadalcanal and Bouganville. 51 years later it still makes an impression on me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 07:14 pm:

The sad part of all this is, it is quickly being forgotten as society ages, and certainly not enough emphasis being placed on these important historical moments in our schools. In this state at least, they're more focused on making sure the kids pass a bunch of certain tests (forget what they call 'em) to make the school districts look good in print, than teaching the important stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, December 06, 2014 - 08:15 pm:

I was 5. I really didn't understand what had happened. Our radio wasn't working so we went for a ride in our aunt and uncle's 49 Plymouth which had a radio. The adults were listening to the radio.

Many years later we visited the Arizona Memorial in Hawaii. When I saw the name of my Jr. High history teacher's husband on the plaque. Tears came to my eyes. She had told us about the attack when in her class. She had seen it, but her husband was on that ship.

Then in 1977 the day was no longer a day of infamy, because my first grandson was born Dec. 7,1977.


Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 12:24 am:

Norm - '49 Plymouth? Nawww,.....maybe '40 or '41, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 01:42 am:

Well, it is December 7, 2014 at this time in Eastern and Central time zones as I write. One bit of irony; if your reverse "14" in 2014, it becomes "41" as in 1941, and both days are on a Sunday.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 03:47 am:

A closer look at the Missouri plaque:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 08:59 am:

"Well, I was stationed aboard the USS New Orleans, and we were tied up at 1010 dock in Pearl Harbor when we attacked again. We were having a turbine lifted, and all of our electrical power wasn't on, and so when we went to lift the ammunition by the hoist, we had to form lines of men form a bucket brigade and we began to carry the ammunition up through the quarterdeck into the gurneys, and I stood there and directed some of the boys down the port side and some down the starboard side, and as they were getting a little tired, I just happened to say, 'Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition.' That's all there was to it."

-- Chaplain Howell M. Forgy, USS New Orleans

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUOPvtVZwo8


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 10:42 am:

Harold, it was a 39. They bought it new and it had a radio. This car looked just like a 37 or 38 Plymouth except had a different grille and it had a column shift.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 10:47 am:

That Kay Kyser version sure has the sound of the time, but it's in stereo and hi-fi. I wonder when it was recorded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Houston, Broken Arrow, OK on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 11:26 am:

I was 8 years old. Dad was not drafted, I guess working in the oil fields and having three children. Dad was one of the younger of 12 children so all the older cousins were drafted and although they were involved in North Africa, Italy and others, they all came home. During the war I was fascinated by the great American aircraft. Interestingly, in 1952, I had a lot of cockpit time in the F51 Fighters(Mustangs). Spartan Aircraft in Tulsa had a contract with the Gov. to referbush 50 F 51's for the Oklahoma National Guard. My job was to add all the decals in the cockpits. I was drafted in 1953.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 11:50 am:

We had being living in Manchester England and had just been bombed out. Some poor German pilot tried to hit a local industrial area and dropped his load early and one hit our house. The brick chimney fell over my crib and they decided I was a goner so they left cleaning until the morning light. Next day when they cleared the mess I was still asleep. During the rest of WWII we moved thru a series of rentals, then back to my parents house in 1946. Naturally I have no memory of any of this, all came from my mother just before she passed about a decade ago.
Actually I think her memory is a little off, as I have read that raids on Manchester took place during 1940 and from newspaper pictures of the events showing few leaves on the trees, I think it was October 1940. However given all that was going on in my Mothers life, my paternal grandmother was German and was interned, my father was in hospital with injuries, remembering it in the wrong year is understandable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 12:03 pm:

Although I wasn't to see the light of day until 1948, that fateful day was emblazoned into my mind by my folks. Dad was building a doghouse for their first dog (Skipper) and Mom was watching. It was a bright sunny morning in SoCal when the the neighbor Gladys Zordich ran outside to tell my folks of the attack.

On Monday morning, my Dad, like many others, went down to enlist but was rejected because he worked for a defence contractor (Douglas Aircraft), which left him feeling guilty until the day he died.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 12:20 pm:

I posted this last year.
Pictures of probably the only vehicle other than military equipment that survived the Pearl Harbor Attack, is this documented '40 Ford Coupe. It belonged to a military officer stationed there. He was driving this car with his wife when the attack occurred. They were going through a grove of trees, when one of the fighters came down at them. They both jumped out of the car and were not hit, the car was, but it was still running. He then ferried troops on the running boards to the battlefield. If you look in the trunk you can see where the damage was repaired. The officer kept the car until his death in Moravia NY. The current and second owner has all the documentation.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 12:46 pm:

As a naval veteran of 25 years steaming past the memorial, and December 7th have always held special meaning to me.

I joined the navy in 1972 but my entire family were naval vets with my father being medically discharged during WWII for injuries he never spoke of. Uncle Roy never came home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robbie Price on Sunday, December 07, 2014 - 05:36 pm:

December 7. Has a special meaning to me. Besides being Pearl Harbor Day it is also My late Grandfather's Birthday. He was born on December 7, 1920 and served his Country in the Army through WWII. His name was Ralph Nichols and His Generation is known as "The Greatest Generation" To me he was the Greatest, not just because he served but because he raised me and lived by example and conviction. He is and forever will be My Hero..... Just paying tribute here because these Men need to be remembered.

Thank You


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Magee on Monday, December 08, 2014 - 03:33 pm:

Robbie, your words brought tears to my eyes.

I was born 1962 but live a great life because of the Greatest Generation. I will not forget and neither will my children.

Thank You


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