Old Photo - A Tireing Job

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo - A Tireing Job
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, December 09, 2014 - 07:59 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Tuesday, December 09, 2014 - 08:47 pm:

Anyone got a time machine they'd loan out?

I could afford 4 new tires if I could just get there. ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, December 09, 2014 - 09:04 pm:

Well I'll be Gum Dipped!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 01:39 am:

Oh, I would buy more than 4...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 02:08 am:

Interesting statement "Gum Dipped" is embossed my my Firestone Tyres too. Any idea what that is all about???
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 11:31 am:

Gum Dipping apparently was referring to a process Firestone used to dip the tires in gum rubber before or between layers of cord. It was started in the 20's or maybe earlier and used in Firestone ads like this one:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1928-Firestone-Gum-Dipped-cotton-rubber-cord-Tires-Cotto n-picking-art-print-ad-/271542350209
It apparently wasn't needed in the sale above. Those look like 19" or 21" to me. Probably Model A era or later.

Most of the "Non-Skid" tires had "Gum-Dipped" on them and later production of the tires for restores continued to have the words even if the make up of the tires was a newer process.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 11:40 am:

Problem is I don't think he would accept today's money. And don't even try a credit or debit card.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 11:59 am:

$3.60 was a lot of money in the 1920's and with inflation would likely be equal to the $150 we pay today for a 30 x 3-1/2 tire.

Can you think of any product other than the Model T that went out of production in 1927 that you can pick up a catalog and order most any part for?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 12:51 pm:

Dang! my time machine broke last week and I need to get to 2055 to get a new framitz.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 03:05 pm:

That photo was taken well into the thirties. Note the base of the console radio set, just inside the window to the right. The streamline styling on it tells me that this is from 1934-39, or thereabouts.

Most likely a "Firestone" brand radio. Firestone had branded products other than tires, like bicycles, batteries, etc. similar to Western Auto and Pep Boys.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 04:27 pm:

For many folks $3.60 was harder to come by in the thirties than in the twenties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 06:42 pm:

Mike Spaziano I think it is just possible that you were a eagle in your last life, you certainly have an eye for detail.

N


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Green - So Cal on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 06:50 pm:

FYI, $3.60 spent in 1935 would equate to $62.39 in today's dollars.

See link: http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 12:06 am:

Thank you for the compliment.

Maybe not an eagle, but I do work with Richard Eagle's daughter. Does that count? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 06:51 am:

Don't forget the sign says buy 1 at the regular price and get the second one at half price (and your old tire) so your total bill for the 2 tires would be $10.80 + tax or $148 + tax in today's dollars so a pretty good price when you pay $100 + per tire today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 09:18 am:

Don't forget that when you travel back to 1935 to buy those tires, you'll have to take 1935 money with you. Depending on serial number and condition, a $10 bill will cost you anywhere from $10 to $60. A $1 bill in average condition can be had for about $12. Some of that will be offset by the two dimes you get in change. Those will be worth anywhere from $4 to $20. If you get just the right Mercury dime it will be worth hundreds, but it's valuable because it's rare, so that's unlikely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 10:51 am:

Mike, that counts for something. I'm not sure what.

Do you suppose the first tire comes fully mounted and the other is "Half Off"?

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 11:05 am:

Mike

Are you sure you did not stay at a Holiday Inn?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter on Thursday, December 11, 2014 - 12:44 pm:

I remember a story my grandpa John Gunter told. He said that in the Missouri Ozarks of the early 1930s, a Model T Ford could be bought for as little as five dollars. He bought a roadster for $5 that would run but had worn out tires. Then he bought a set of slightly used tires for $10. He drove the car to his job in West Plains, Missouri, which was about 20 miles from home in Ozark County, MO.

One day John was driving down the street and a man on the sidewalk yelled out, "What would you take for it?"

John said, "Give me twenty dollars and I'll walk home tonight."

John walked the twenty miles back home that night. I don't recall how he got to work the next day but he had twenty dollar in his pocket--a profit of 5 bucks.


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