What Tools Help to Remove Carbie?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What Tools Help to Remove Carbie?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 08:15 pm:

I want to remove the carbie on my mostly 1923 Runabout to switch out the hardware. The picture below shows what it looked like before I had another fellow work on the carb and clean out some muck that found its way inside. When he put it back on it was with scrap hardware that is both mismatched and rusty. I want to get it all sorted.

The problem is that I can't seem to find any wrenches or sockets that will turn the nuts & bolts. When I assembled it after rebuilding the engine I bolted the carb to the manifold and then the manifold to the engine - easy peasy.

What do you use to get at the hardware without wrecking things?

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 08:33 pm:

To remove the carbie, those tools won't work.

You'll need wrenchies and socketies. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 08:35 pm:

I use a 9\16 socket that is also a universal joint on a 3 inch extension to go in from the generator side. Sometimes all I can fit in the other side is a screw driver between the bolt head and the carb body. For me it works very good.

Steven


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 08:51 pm:

Here it is


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 09:21 pm:

Paul-

Sometimes you can wedge a screwdriver between the flat of the nut and the body of the carburetor to hold the bolt, then turn the nut with an open end wrench from the end, and use an adjustable wrench to turn the open end wrench. Follow?

After you get it off, get two 5/16" fine thread nuts, drill them out with a 21/64" bit and run a 3/8"x24 tap through them. Then you can use a 1/2" socket with a short extension, or a 1/2" deep socket to attach or remove the nuts.

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 09:37 pm:

I use two 9/16 box wrenches. Hold the head with one and turn the nut with the other. Usually you can only turn it a short distance before re positioning the wrench. After it is loosened a bit I can turn the nuts off with my finger. There is not enough room to fit sockets in the space.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 10:07 pm:

This set up from Lang's is a big help!

https://www.modeltford.com/item/4130GEN.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Conte on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 11:00 pm:

I used an offset box wrench and a swivel adapter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 11:27 pm:


You want a 9/16" crow foot.


Use the crow foot to hold the bolt head by the carburetor and a 9/16" socket to turn the nut. If you don't have a crow foot, the screwdriver method works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, January 03, 2015 - 11:51 pm:

Using a screw driver as a wedge/lock on the bolt head is a trick I've also used. The clearances are a bit thin but a swivel socket is a heck of a helper. You can usually drop an open end on the bolt head too. Crow's foot's OK if you have 'em but that swivel saves you some cursing for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 04:02 am:

Paul : I use this home made wrench .
677R
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 05:02 am:

These are my two favourite tools. I have yet to come across a carby I could not get off with them.Both US made, beautiful fine heads which get in tight spaces and both with short throws needed on T carbs.1/2 x 9/16 dwarf ring spanners


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 09:40 am:

These special bolts work well---

.


Accessory Carb Mounting Bolts



When bolting the carb to the intake, getting to the bolt heads can be a real pain! These are long headed bolts that stick out far enough that you can easily get a wrench on the hex.


Part Number

Specifics

Price

T-4130-MB 1919-27 $16.95 / set
T-4130-MBE 1909-18 $16.95 / set

Check the Snyders catalog---paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 09:41 am:

The pic I showed is ford tool 5Z817, amazing how the right tool works. Mossberg #is 627. I have found several of these at flea markets for a dollar or two, they come up on ebay from time to time but are pricey. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 06:09 pm:

Allan Bennett has shown the type wrench I use Works well. It is a very common wrench and can be used for many other functions as well.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb - Lake Forest - So. CA on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 07:37 pm:

I'd worry about that fan belt running all kattywompus first!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, January 04, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

That same wrench Keith shows also fits the bolt that holds the timer on. 9/16 & 5/8. I payed around 15 each plus shipping for the one I have and another I got for a friend later who was looking for one. Worth the money if you can get one. Very handy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 03:59 am:

A couple of the Ford wrenches are currently on eBay for about $20 plus shipping.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 12:47 pm:

Thanks Steve, can you send me a link to the ebay sales?

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 12:53 pm:

I'm glad to see that others have had trouble getting at those very frustratingly visible nuts & bolts and have come up with a number of solutions. I love the idea of getting a real Ford tool to use and will look for one of those.

Who sells the thin wall box end wrenches these days?

Until then, I'll try the crowfoot wrenches which I purchased to get a waterpump off of a '39 Cadillac.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 09:40 pm:

I did find one of the double ended Ford wrenches on eBay. I wasn't able to find a set of thin wall wrenches anywhere. Are they still made?

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 10:01 pm:

Paul, when I need a thin wall, I pick up a flea market find and grind, heat, bend or whatever to work. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 06, 2015 - 12:41 am:

Paul, both mine are old timers. One is just 4" long.
I found one at a Farm clearing sale and one in a junk shop. Just keep your eyes open.

Allan from down under.


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