Boiled linseed oil , what do you think ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Boiled linseed oil , what do you think ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 01:31 pm:

So , my sons and I ( have all three ages 9-17 interested now ! ) have been working on our 26 tudor , have to save up to buy a new radiator... So .. Not ready for a full on restoration right now but we were thinking of removing the surface rust with steel wool and light sandpaper then coating whole outside with boiled linseed oil . My question is this , should we and enjoy the car as is. And how head is it to take back off when ready to do complete restoration ? Thanks .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 01:57 pm:

Travis,

Not sure if linseed oil or a light oil is best for your application. If you're not planning on long term storage, then I probably wouldn't do anything.

But if in case you're not aware, be careful with how you dispose of your linseed oil soaked rags afterwards. There have been several close calls involving people on this forum regarding spontaneous combustion. Here is one: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/344287.html?1362211375


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 02:33 pm:

Travis - I would go with the linseed treatment and enjoy the car. When the time comes for a complete restoration, removal of the linseed oil can be accomplished using acetone (though you might subject the body to some form of media blasting during the restoration and that will also handle the linseed coating). I restored the tractor in my profile pic as a nut & bolt, showroom finish and when I was done, I swore that would be my last one. Since then, I have finished my other gals in linseed oil - it preserves the patina and they are far more interesting (in my opinion) to look at in their "work clothes."

Yes - be careful with disposal of the application rags (I use a 80-20 mix of boiled linseed & mineral spirits, apply with cheap chip brushes and wipe the excess away with rags - disposing of all in water-filled, sealed containers). Linseed oil has been used by farmers to protect equipment for decades and it works.

Do whatever you need to do to enjoy the car NOW - while your boys are still under your roof. Waiting until a complete restoration is feasible will see you turning wrenches alone in a garage and the boys as grown men, visiting for the holidays. Too precious an opportunity to waste - they grow up fast.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 02:38 pm:

"Boiled" linseed oil has driers and often varnish. If you want to hide the rust and give it a good patina, try W-D 40 on the body and you'll be surprised how good it looks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 02:55 pm:

Boiled linseed finish:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 05:20 pm:

Here is a thread on rust preservation from the HCCA site that may interest you:

http://boards.hcca.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=711

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 05:30 pm:

Linseed oil (and oil soaked rags of all types) should be disposed of with care, as they
can create a heat when wadded or piled, causing fire. Fully drying rags by laying them
out or putting them in the sun is a good plan. As a guy with a wood stove in the shop,
if I am not going to reuse my rags (just too gunked up), I pop them in the stove and
problem is solved. Most people don't give it a second thought and some end up in a
pile, heat up, and the next thing they know they have a fire to deal with. As this usually
takes hours to develop, they are usually long gone and in the house or in bed and not
there to witness a problem developing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 05:34 pm:

Just remembered. Last car I treated to preserve the patina I used Howards. The color doesn't really matter, it all looks the same on the car. It does as much for an old car finish as it does for furniture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 06:43 pm:

I actually use ATF on my stuff. Been curious how it compares to Linseed oil though--due to Ron's postings here.

I use ATF on machined surfaces such as cylinder bores if they will not be assembled right away. It works good.

I also wipe down my '25 pickup with ATF on the metal / painted parts. And it keeps your hands nice too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard e moore on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

I use liquid gold floor polish. Last a long time. Won't collect dirt and comes off easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

I believe that Ryan Glowacki did a complete tractor with boiled linseed oil looked great as far as removal from metal when you are ready for a complete restoration mineral spirits ( the clear smelly stuff not the milky stuff) works but does involve scrubbing, but that's what the boys are for!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Curtis...Atlanta,Ga on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 07:52 pm:

I use a product that controls the rust and turns the part black. Just go to any NAPA parts store and pick up a bottle of rust converter. If you have old cars you you should always have some on hand anyway!. It looks like milk but converts the rust to a hard black coating. I cut it with water to thin it down and just brush it on the rust spots. When it cures it looks like a perfect match to the old existing paint and one application is all that's needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

Ah the chocolate tractor! I'm so glad I did this instead of reprinting! Linseed oil darkens rust to a beautiful color. My 1929 McCormick Deering 10-20:

I would have done this to my truck but when I finally found a TT, it had too much paint on it!

Besides darkening the rust, it also beads water and has lasted about 3 years so far. I will probably touch it up again next spring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 08:00 pm:

I meant repainting, not reprinting. Sorry about that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

Color difference before/after with linseed oil. Every damned inch of that tractor was done in linseed. "Environmentally friendly" so the Eco-fascists keep off your grille doors, inexpensive, easy to apply, long-lasting. Cannot beat it:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Monday, January 05, 2015 - 09:21 pm:

Looks great !!! Thank you all for the responses , we're going to go with the linseed oil and Ron you're right about doing it now as the time really goes fast and I want them to enjoy it now not wait til it's "finished" because I know how long it might take . I'm still working on my first T a 1926 roadster pick up , and I bought that one in 97 when I was 26 yrs old. This one has kinda lit a fire under my butt and maybe we will get that one done soon now that the boys are interested :-) thanks again to all .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Tuesday, January 06, 2015 - 06:41 am:

Travis - good luck and post some pictures as you're working on it!!!


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