How long did it take to make a crankshaft in 1908?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: How long did it take to make a crankshaft in 1908?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Conte on Thursday, January 08, 2015 - 10:01 pm:

Being a machinist I find this video hypnotic, sort of like watching a symphony. Everything has to be perfectly timed, one wrong calculation and it's off to the scrapheap.
I wonder what Henry Ford would say about it?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81UjjSH2iFw


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Thursday, January 08, 2015 - 10:34 pm:

Amazing! Can't believe how fast that machines the work. Thanks for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, January 08, 2015 - 10:51 pm:

Henry would be amazed by the capabilities of NC machining. On the other hand he would be disturbed hogging out the crank instead of starting with a forging and doing minimal machining thereby not wasting a lot of material and machine time. I suspect the Dodge brothers would have had the process of forging and machining a crankshaft down pretty well in 1908. Seems like the NC process took about half an hour, assuming it was not edited. I suspect the production crankshafts of 1908 took a while longer, I would guess with one set of machines about 4 crankshafts a day could be made.

I was a little surprised none of the cutters had chip breakers which resulted in long spirals of cuttings. I suspect a final grinding of the journals would be required. Some of them seemed a little rough and I doubt they were true within 0.0005 as a modern crank would be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 09, 2015 - 11:14 am:

Cool! There was a lot of editing in that video and at some point the crank was turned around. There were a lot of steps in that one operation. I sure would hate to have to pay for that machine and all the tooling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Friday, January 09, 2015 - 12:15 pm:

I have a similar machine about thirty feet from my office and I can tell you $500K is usually the starting price. Seems like every option you want to add is $25K, then add tooling for another $100k or so.

The parts we machine take about an hour to process complete using both spindles. So I'm guessing a crankshaft would take several hours to machine complete.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker on Friday, January 09, 2015 - 10:27 pm:

I use to have a Curved Dash Oldsmobile and the crank broke. There we several attempts at fixing but in the end I had had a new one machined by Molex in Detroit. Cost about $1000 ten years ago. It was much simpler than the one In the video but quite long, about 20 inches. Given the price it probably took less than ten hours of machining, probably closer to five.
Looking at the equipment in the Ford photos taken in 1914 when they made 300,000 in a year, 50 weeks in the year, 6 days a week, two shifts of 8 hours means that had to make about 63 per hour. In the picture I saw, there were about ten machining stations, so each machine had to made six per hour, that is 10 minutes each..... Even if they had 20 machining stations, it would still be 20 minutes each, that is FAST...


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