Ford TT questions from a newbie

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Ford TT questions from a newbie
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:33 am:

Good evening all,

I'm currently looking at a 1925 Ford TT, and just have a few questions on this relatively uncommon model. I've heard that the extra weight and lower gearing limit the speed on these to around 20mph, but if weight could be shed, as in perhaps a shorter bed, could this drive at a more highway-friendly speed? Thank you in advance for any help, I do appreciate it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 01:04 am:

I have a 25 and a 26. Speed is limited to the gearing. Namely the worm gear type rear end.
Standard gearing will shake the old dog to death at 20. High speed gears, such as I have in
my 26 let me get NEAR 30, but the old girl is vibrating pretty bad. Highway speeds are off the
radar for possible without serious modifications.

It is my goal to be able to cruise at 45, and I am going to start with getting everything tight
and balanced to fix all wear issues. An auxiliary transmission will help, working as an overdrive.
I am told building the engine to get more power is going to be mandatory and will be exploring
that end too.

Let's not forget brakes, ... or lack thereof. Stopping any T is like driving on ice when compared
to modern iron. You need to allow plenty of reaction time and anticipate problems before they are
right in front of you.

Adding brakes is not a real option without it being really obvious. Those spoke wheels and hub
construction don't adapt well without serious modification.

If speed is your gig, a TT probably isn't a real good option without a death wish. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 02:51 am:

I have a 25 C-Cab. I have the 5.17 gears and 650-20 tires. I have been gps at 42. Stock motor except pop up pistons. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 05:19 am:

Just like Scott Owens I have a '25 C-Cab with the same gearing and tires....and the engine with the pop-up pistons. It also has a Warford 6-speed. I have no problem being road worthy and staying up with other Ts on tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 10:41 am:

Robert -- The TT came with 7:1 rear gears as standard equipment. The 5.17:1 gearing was an option, and highly sought after today. The truck you're looking at might possibly have the higher-speed gears in it already. Seems to me that there is a stamp or something on the rear end if it has those gears. Someone else will have to remind us what and where that stamp is.

To run with T cars on tours, you'll need an accessory transmission with an overdrive gear added behind the Ford transmission. The Warford mentioned by John McG is one of those.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 11:03 am:

I'm not sure about North Carolina but in Texas, NO stock Model T, including the cars, are capable of "highway-friendly speed". Most of the county and state roads are 55-60 and some 70. The interstate highways range from 55-60 through cities to 75 and 80 for rural stretches. There's one state toll road that has a speed limit of 85. But, you could drive in one direction for 12-14 hours at 55 and never get out of the state so there are some long and lonely stretches of highway out there. :-)

As already mentioned, you can make a T go faster but you will still have 20mph brakes unless you change that too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

I know some people modify their trucks to get them up above 40 mph, and I haven't heard of anybody getting killed doing it, but the very thought of it scares me. The weight saved by a shorter bed would be insignificant next to the combined weight of the TT rear axle, suspension, and frame. Add the aux transmission and that's more mass with more inertia for the brakes to overcome. The TT was designed to carry heavy loads on 1917 roads, not for speed. That's why speedsters you see in pictures from the teens and twenties are made from cars, not trucks. If you want to run at modern highway speeds get a Packard or other vehicle designed to do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:45 pm:

About 10 years ago I even thought that changing out my TT rear wheels from 20" to 23" would increase speed . . . NOT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:47 pm:

How about a jet engine mounted on the rear deck ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

I see that you are in Havelock, NC. From what I remember there are a lot of nice back roads around that area where a stock or high speed gear with a stock engine would be just fine. Just don't get Richard Petty riding up your back end. He has a tendency to bump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:59 pm:

I was wondering if there was some sort of external indicator of the rear end gearing, since there's the two different options. I'm hoping the owner has some documentation on if it's got the "speedy delivery" gearing that Ford mentioned in their advertisements. I've also found a 1924 roadster for sale, but it hasn't been started in 5 years according to the current owner. He's also unsure as to what it needs, and it has a "rebuilt" title. I'm a pretty good mechanic, and have rebuilt engines/transmissions before but again, I'm completely new to T's and to flathead engines in general. The TT runs/drives, but hasn't been on the road since '81.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 01:08 pm:

As indicated above, shedding a little weight will not speed up a TT. In fact when I put our '18 TT together I drove it around a little with no cab or bed at all, using the gas tank as a seat. It made no noticeable difference.

In my opinion the question is not, "How can I speed up a TT." Instead I would ask "What do I plan to do with my old car/truck?" If the answer is that you want to travel around at modern highway speeds, then a TT is probably the wrong choice. If you want to explore back roads, take your time and smell the roses and enjoy the countryside then a TT is a consideration.

Just my $.02 worth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 01:33 pm:

Not sure any external parts can tell you the ring gear in that worm axle that makes the ratio,

This older thread gives explanation on how to crank over the engine and count wheel revs to calculate what gear ration is in the TT rear end.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/77086.html?1231476734


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 01:47 pm:

The roadster may be a horrible money pit, or it may be perfectly OK. That applies to any car that hasn't run for several years. Sometimes cars aren't used because of their poor condition, but in some cases it's for reasons having nothing to do with their condition. That's why it's a good idea to get an experienced T person to help you check it out before you buy. When considering buying a Model T, don't be intimidated by lack of experience in working on them. It ain't brain surgery. Yes, there are some mechanical surprises hiding in there waiting to bite you and your bank account, but here's the cure for that:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 02:06 pm:

Here is a chart that will give an expectation of speeds with standard and high speed gearing:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

I'm with Mr. Jelf on this one. When I'm behind the wheel of my TT topping out at 15 mph, my one thought is "I would not want to go any faster in this wood and metal death-trap!" A very strange sensation considering I love my fast cars. This truck is meant to show you the world at a different speed. That speed being the speed of a bicycle. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lonnie Ledbetter Sheridan,Or on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 06:37 pm:

The TT are not for speed my son and I are building a 1925 C cab We have done a lot of looking and research to find things to make it faster and save
so we have started the running gear it has an aux transmission. It is a Twin High/ High low 3 speed made by continues torque. It mounted to a ruckstell with high speed ratio gears this set up gives us 12 forward speeds. We will properly never use all of them the one that matters is the high end witch we will have a final rational of 3.25 to 1 this is about the same as a car. We also found a set of original rocky mountain brakes. The plan is to run 7.50x20 tires on the rear. There are not a lot of trucks around are area people tell me they don't go fast enough for the tours but we are not building this truck to do tours we plan on driving it if I need to go to town to get milk then why not drive the TT These trucks were built to be driven and that's what we are going to do with it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:51 pm:

The Roadster would make a better all-around driver than the TT. I'd get more info about that before plunking down money on the truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J Marino on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 08:28 pm:

I just want to keep up with the other T's on a tour. 24 C Cab express bed, high dome aluminum pistons, drive cam, no magnets/coil ring, oil slingers, Bendix brakes, 5:1 gears, and a Muncie overdrive. Click on my name to see her.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 08:51 pm:

I'd go for the roadster. My 1st T was a TT. By the time I had restored everything but the bed and cab and could drive it around, I got disenchanted with it and started looking for a high speed ring gear and worm, and an aux trans. Before finding what I thought I needed, I had bought a speedster. Many years passed before I decided to accept the TT for what it was, and finish it as it came from the factory. The Warford is still sitting on the shop floor, and the high speed gears are still on the shelf (neither are for sale). I have several other T's to satisfy whatever mood I'm in, but, there are times when I want to enjoy my TT. I've seen several people over the years get away from T's altogether when their first T (TT) could never reached their expectations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 08:54 pm:

I believe the gear ratio in the differential is stamped on the square plate at the rear of the drive shaft worm gear housing on the top of the rear axle. I have been shown this on a coupe of our Canadian sourced trucks.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J Marino on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 09:05 pm:

My TT rolling down the road at about 35 mph:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grmG2lr1Jvc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 11:49 pm:

Allan,
I have read that USA production TT rear ends with the high ratio gear set were marked with a painted white dot at that location. I have never found any documentation to substantiate this and of course even if it's true most of the white dots would be long gone by now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 01:24 am:

I figured that based off of the gearing and from what you all have said, that it'd probably just make a nice, slow back road cruiser. Plenty of those in NC, but I'm currently in lovely 29 Palms CA. Lots of hills, lots of back roads too. If I get it, it'll probably do better in NC than here. I know all about slow cruising and enjoying the sites, I've got a Vespa I roll around on at a nice mild 35mph. Gives you time to enjoy things, and worry less about how long it takes to get somewhere. It makes sense that weight loss wouldn't affect top speed so much as it might acceleration.

If I luck out and get it (it's a closed auction sale) I'm thinking that I'd do a nice olive-drab paint scheme, and perhaps turn it into a troop/ammo carrier replica and put my unit logo/RUC number on it (I'm in the Marines). I've got a 280z I'm in the process of restoring and she's quick, so I'm not too concerned with going fast in a T. The roadster looks nice, but the posting is gone and either the car was sold, or was a bum craigslist ad. Given that it was posted for all of 10 hours, I'd say it was a bum post.

I'd like to thank all of you who have taken the time to post answers and advice, I'm on other car forums (Datsun/Nissan) and you all are a good bit more welcoming and helpful. Thank you! Hopefully I'll be posting pictures soon of a TT in the California high-desert!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 01:32 am:

Semper Fi, Sir ! ... and thank you for your service.

Just wrapped up 3 years with the USMC in AFG with RCT 1bn/Aco.

If your TT doesn't pan out, I was just asked by a friend to help him
sell his. I already have two, or I'd buy it myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 01:38 am:

Also forgot to ask, what is the typical price range for a TT in average/below average condition? If it were a Hagerty condition rating it'd probably be a #4 or "fair" weekend driver truck. I know what Hagerty and others price it at, but that's not always what classic/antique cars sell for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 02:11 am:

For a TT as you describe it, I'd say three or four grand, tops. If you'd really prefer a car, skip the TT and be a little patient. There are lots of T's for sale, and it shouldn't take long to find something you'd like.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 08:53 am:

Frankly, I am bored with conventional Ts....too common. My interest has changed to TTs because they are more interesting and have more variations and are more useful, particularly since I have a farm. Love all the opportunities to improvise and customize to make TTs the way they were used in the past.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 09:46 am:

My guess is that most people with T cars don't generally drive faster than what a TT will do. The TTs are heavier and are very unique and there are a far smaller percentage of them out there compared to the cars. Things like high speed gear sets are out there if you look hard enough. I started looking for a set a few months ago and ended up with three sets. Regardless of what you decide to do, keep after the T hobby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 02:27 pm:

I really don't have a preference between a T or TT, because they're both great-looking and interesting vehicles in my mind. A roadster or speedster would be nice, but I think I'll jump on the TT if the price for the truck and for the shipping of it is right. My hometown (Havelock) is small, so I could haul around in it without much trouble. Maybe a nice slow trip to Atlantic Beach once in awhile, but mostly just enjoy having a TT.

I've mostly worked on imports (air-cooled VW and Datsun) but I've decided that my next project will be something American and classic. Doesn't get much more American than a model T, as far as I can see.

What's the insurance on these things like? Oh, and I forgot to mention that it's a C cab truck, don't know if that could have any effect on the type of rear/ruckstell it has.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 03:05 pm:

Robert,
I love my TT, but, it's dangerous to drive it most places. People see you, but, it just don't register that something would be on the road doing 15 mph. I have a national and state park nearby where the speed limit is 25-35. That's one of the few places I feel safe driving it on the highway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

Burger, you said RCT-1? I was with RCT-6 in 2012, and spent most of my career with 6th Marines HQ. Good to see/hear from other Marines on the forum.

Mike, I can see your point on driving something slow and being surrounded by inattentive drivers. Most people don't realize that a scooter tops out at 35, and I get drivers behind me that come dangerously close to rear-ending me. Most of the T's I've seen on the road have some sort of large reflective placard on the back to warn other drivers of their speed (or lack thereof) , similar to the ones used on horse-drawn carriages in Amish/Mennonite country.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 03:32 pm:

My '25 TT is licensed as a regular truck so I can drive it any time anywhere I want. Insurance is very low. I take my truck all over the local area. I use my roadster for touring and trips. You will need two T's at least. PK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 05:34 pm:

Pat,
My TT is also licensed as a regular truck. I have low ratio rear end gears and a Muncie. It'll do about 35 MPH flat out, but 30 is much more comfortable. I take it pretty much wherever I want, but I'm careful about what roads I use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 06:49 pm:

As I am relatively new to the T (actually TT) scene, I am hatching my evil plots on how to
take over the world with my T trucks now. As I see it, it is a multi-pronged offensive, with
attacks to be centered on building the truck/s for speeds a little more compatible with the
"new America" of casual stunt drivers on the road today, AND a reach around plan to warn
such stunt drivers that there is a slow moving vehicle in their path of travel and perhaps
some level of slow-the #@!-down needs to be put into play before they run right up my axx.

The former may involve a standard passenger car rear end getting swapped into the truck,
an auxilliary transmission to raise the high end gear ratios, building the engine for higher HP
output, and of course, dialing in all bearings and balancing to make the old dog wind out as
smoothly as possible.

The latter might involve the big reflective placard on the back like the Amish use, but perhaps
even a strobe-type LED system for times when our brilliant highway departments decided
to obliterate the old highway to put in the Interstate. Our nearby I-90 over 4th of July and
Lookout Passes comes to mind as places I'd have real concerns about driving a T in the
same shark pool as all the big rigs trying to make time through the mountains. Either way,
finding something that could be placed for times of need, and removed when you get back
onto good ol' two-laners.

It has always been my plan to drive the wheels off my truck/s. Go to surround states, or
just around here. Taking all day to get to the destination means less time at the objective.
So, some work will be done to find a better balance for my interests in using the truck while
preserving as much of the aesthetics and ambiance as possible.

Pat, ... I like your "statement of fact" : "You will need two T's, at least." !!! Some here
might say a dozen isn't quite "enough". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 07:49 am:

I get 25 mph cruise speed out of my TT, or at least close to it. 23-24 anyway. It has the low speed 7.25:1 rear end and no auxiliary transmission and nothing special done to the engine. Perhaps I'm turning up the engine faster than some of you are comfortable with, but it doesn't seem to mind. I haven't crunched the numbers lately, but it seems like it was somewhere in the 1900 rpm range. I keep seeing a lot of folks say they drive theirs at 15 mph. That's OK if that's what you want to do, but I wouldn't want to tell a newbie that's all he can get, 'cause I'm easily getting half again that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 08:07 am:

Ford didn't balance the drive shafts much and I've read about issues with the longer TT driveshaft whipping at certain speeds. Maybe that's the main reason for Ford's recommendation to not exceed 15 mph with the 7.25:1 and 22 mph with the 5.17:1 gears.

With a balanced driveshaft (or three bronze bolts threaded into the driveshaft housing stopping the whip) you can drive faster without much trouble (ok, worse mileage and babbitt adjustments more often?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 08:23 am:

I'm sure that adding an auxiliary transmission (thus reducing the driveshaft length) will help with the driveshaft wobble problem.

I will get a TT one day and mine will have the high speed rear and a Warford (or something similar). I'll run a high compression head, 280 cam, and an upgraded carb. Haha, will probably move the Zenith I have on speedster over to TT once I get a U&J for the speedster.

But I'll keep the stock exhaust and ignition. It'll never be a speedster with that setup but shouldn't have any trouble keeping up on tour or cruising at 40-45 mph.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Knowles - Moncton, New Brunswick on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 08:52 am:

I have A TT that is almost finished with the 5:1 gears and nothing else. Engine is stock with cast pistons. I have played around the neighbourhood with it and I would guess that I am running at 20-22 mph flat out. I am sure it will shake itself to pieces if I stay at that speed. Seems to cruise better a little slower. I don't see myself touring with this anytime soon. Just a fun thing to play around with.
Looking at the chart posted earlier, I would say they are bang on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 10:11 am:


The TT is for work. Hauling.


For cruising and touring, get a car.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Williams on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 11:20 am:

I have a 1924 TT C-Cab with the earlier wheels and the HS gears and I've been clocked on radar at 38MPH. The engine is standard...noting Hi-performance. My C-Cab was featured in the Model T Times back in 2008. It was also one of the 10 or so TT on the 100th anniversary tour and it's been on at least 5 MTFCI tours in the recent past. Above 25MP, it as smooth as my T cars. Only vibrates during a small range, kind of like an out of balance tire. This is due to the long solid drive shaft and common to all TTs. Some folk have place a bearing midway in the torque tube that solved the vibration issue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Mine gets the driveshaft vibration at about 18 mph. It is a resonant frequency thing. It only does it at that speed. I goes away above and below. No problem to just accelerate through it. It lasts for maybe a second or so as you go through that speed. I have to wonder if that is another reason so many TT owners are scared to get over 15 mph. Maybe they experience the driveshaft whip and panic and close the throttle. No way would I try to drive at the speed that the driveshaft whip takes place, but accelerating through that speed takes only a second or so and it calms right back down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 02:21 pm:

Seems like lots of TT owners should get their drive shafts balanced. Then no whip regardless of speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 03:18 pm:

I sure wish that was true, Seth, but even a perfectly balanced driveshaft has a "critical speed" above which it can begin to deflect and get into a "whipping" mode.

Proper driveshaft balance is certainly a help, but doesn't eliminate the problem.

Remember, if you run an overdrive transmission, the driveshaft will spin faster than the engine.

Here is a good discussion of "critical speed" from the Dana Corporation website:

http://www2.dana.com/expert/wc.dll?cvsp~Decrits~

Unfortunately, the Dana website critical speed calculator doesn't handle the Model T configuration with only a single U-joint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 04:13 pm:

Steve, how long do those cattle stay on back of that TT before they jump over those low side boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 04:24 pm:

The Touring Car in Steve's second pic is a very early '15 model, with E&J #6 cowl lamps. I wish we could see the license plate on the front, to see when this pic was taken. It's interesting that the car has treaded tires on the rear.

Steve -- You wouldn't happen to have another pic of that car showing the date on the plate, would you?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 05:09 pm:

On my TT's maiden voyage in 1977, after a fresh rebuild of all mechanicals (including NOS cast iron pistons), at 20mph, a main bearing started knocking. After replacing the cap all was well. Since then, I've never ran it wide open for extended periods. It seems to feel good between 15-17. I think a lot of the problem was me--it was my first time driving a T or TT on an open road without my "instructor".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

Mike,
look closely--that 15 appears to also have the forked headlights.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 05:22 pm:

Isn't it a Canadian '15? Looks like it can be a real driver's door. That would explain the forked lights, Canadian cars had them, but only prototype '15:s in the US.

(Message edited by Roger K on January 12, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 06:11 pm:

Wow Steve, that TT is very close to my stake bed, although I still haven't found an exact duplicate. Mine is on my profile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 07:41 pm:

Nice to meet another TT driver(s).

My 2 cents worth:

BIG IS BETTER. Larger diameter rear tyres 6.5 - 20 make a difference. (mine are 2" taller than the 'standard' tyres).

HOWEVER if you install an overdrive (aux gearbox), like I have, you may want smaller diameter tyres. Why? as the greater the tyre diameter the higher the effective gear ration is until at some point it gets a little too high for the engine without it lugging. With the Ruxtell, Aux overdrive I have 8 forward speeds and 4 reverse, so usually find at least 1 that will suit the speed/load.

Well balanced and maintained engine (as is the case for any T).

INDICATORS (turn signals) AND BRAKE LIGHT (I would rather be safe than a dead 'purist')

AUXILIARY gear box is a must for anything like over 30 in comfort with out shaking to death. There are many options out there.

DIFF RATIOS. A high speed worm and ring gear set helps (the standard Ford high ratio is good, the new repro higher ratio would be better - subject to my comment above about being too highly geared).

STOP. make sure the brakes are GOOD or, better yet, install aftermarket bands (or discs) to rear axle. With all that weight hurtling along at 30 - 40 mph you need to be able to stop safely.

USE. Yes, I use my TT for carrying and fetching. With a load the need for good brakes and planning ahead to stop is important :-)

All the best and have fun!

Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Leonhardt on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 09:24 pm:

Gentlemen,

The initial intent in restoring our 2900 pound '26 Model TT Closed Cab Truck was to "Enjoy Life in the Slow Lane" which was equipped with the hi speed rear end gears, Rocky Mountain brakes, 6:50 X 20 rear threads, and Twin Hi Lo auxiliary transmission. However, after participating in a few Model T tours it was apparent an upgrade was necessary if we wanted to climb those challenging hills and keep up with Model T cars. The goal was to improve low end torque with higher speed as a by-product of our efforts. Note --- no drive line vibration is experienced (shorter drive shaft and rear end mounted auxiliary transmission).

With that said, initial upgrades were to add the following: Z head, Straight thru Holley NH carb., foam air filter, Stipe improved grind camshaft, ANCO Hot-Spot manifold, Stipe adjustable timing gear. Note --- fuel economy improved.

After completing the above upgrades, we decided to further enhance the TT performance with the following: SCAT counterbalanced stroker crankshaft and Ruckstell rear axle.

We're completely satisfied with the performance of our TT.

Jack & Barb Leonhardt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred McDonald on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

I built a Fire Truck on a TT chassis with a 26 motor and High speed Ruckstell. Although it ran great, it was never comfortable over 25 mph. They just weren't designed for speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 11:11 pm:

Jack - You simply must tell us, with all the upgrades to your engine and the high speed rear end gears, Twin Hi Lo auxilliary transmission, and the Ruckstell rear end, what speed does your TT cruise at?

BTW, that really is a nice picture of your TT truck on your profile.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Leonhardt on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 07:05 am:

Keith,

Thank you for your kind words --- as you know and seen, our TT was a "Labor of Love" that is on going.

The combination of a strong engine, the Twin Hi Lo Auxiliary transmission (Under, Direct, & Overdrive)and Ruckstell rear end affords us the ability to cruise in the high thirties/forties yet attacking those tough hills. Winds have a major impact on the "Billboard" designed Closed Cab Stakebed that weighs in at 2900 pounds empty.

When it comes to the 4th of July parade we participate in each year,the TT shines --- placing the Twin Hi Lo auxiliary transmission in "underdrive" and sliding the Ruckstell rear axle into Ruckstell "Low", we're able to idle along the entire parade route without stepping on the Ford low pedal.

Our TT is a fun vehicle to drive, however make sure you have sufficient fuel in your tank for those hills ---- Keith Gumbinger continues to remind me.

Jack & Barb Leonhardt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 10:12 am:

Jack,
That is indeed a nice machine...and a good combination of engine and driveline. I have my '25 TT C-Cab on tours in the mountains and found fuel level problems so I added a vacuum tank on the firewall...a good solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 12:38 pm:

So the bidding has started on the TT, it's set at 1,470 right now. I'm waiting till the closing hours to make my bid, if the price stays within a range in my budget. I started off bidding, using the auto-bid that most sites offer. It looks like there might be one other person bidding currently, hopefully it stays that way and I can sneak in at the last minute and grab up the TT!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 02:41 pm:

If you're going to try a last-minute bid, be sure you're logged in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 02:53 pm:

I use auctionsniper.com.

It will automatically put in your bid a user-specified number of seconds prior to the auction close (it defaults to 5 seconds). Their fees are very reasonable and you only pay a fee if you win the auction.

https://www.auctionsniper.com/?gclid=CODz3N6KwL8CFQwGaQodiwYACA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 08:34 pm:

Well - did you win the auction?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:00 pm:

The auction hasn't ended yet, it ends tomorrow at 5pm EST. It's currently at 3,300, someone else has the high bid at the moment. I'll be waiting to see how things go as it gets closer to the closing time for the auction. There's a 10% "buyers premium", plus CA state tax, tag and title, and around $350 for shipping as well. I'd like to know what exactly this "buyers premium" is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 07:20 am:

That is why I seldom ever bid on on-line auctions. I don't like being sniped and it has about gotten to where you can't buy anything unless you do snipe. Not wanting to do to others what I don't like done to me, I usually just don't bother buying unless it's a "Buy now".

Someone once mentioned a policy that I thought was a good idea: The auction is extended by 15 minutes if a bid is received during the last 15 minutes of the auction. But I don't suppose that has been implemented.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 10:22 am:

The buyer's premium is a surcharge added to the sale price to get extra money for the auction house, so both the seller and the buyer are paying the auctioneer directly. I'm not a fan of it, but if something I want is being sold I'll attend and just remember that each $10 I bid is really $11.

I remember a market about thirty years ago where all the prominently displayed prices had a very tiny +10% after them. It was located next to a housing project in a poor neighborhood. I suppose the idea was to take advantage of folks who were too unsophisticated to understand what was going on. Sort of a soak the poor policy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

I'd prefer a "buy it now" option as well, since it seems to work out better than hoping you win against bid-snipers at the last minute. It's still at 3,300 *knocks on wood* and has around 4hr left. So, if things work out I'll be posting pics of a newly-purchased TT. If not, I'll keep an eye on listings here and elsewhere, and hope that I can find a T/TT project in the near-future. There are some nice ones on modelthaven, but most are too far from me to be an option.

Thank you Steve on the "buyers premium" explanation. I figured it was some sort of auctioneer fund, similar to the ones on Barrett-Jackson and such. I just feel that the funding should be levied on the seller, rather than the buyer. Especially since the buyer gets hit by sales tax and tags/titles, etc. It basically says "hey, thanks for purchasing through us, and by 'thanks' we mean pay us even more money". Oh well, even with the premiums and an open-trailer transport worked in to the price I'd be in at around 4,100 total. Not bad?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 05:11 pm:

Lost the bid, it ended at $3,750. I placed that bid, but the other bidder(s) had auto-bid amounts higher than me, and that would've went beyond what I wanted to spend since shipping, taxes, etc. would've put it pretty close to $5,000 all-in. Not counting that it'd also need routine maintenance items from sitting since '81, I figured that the price was too high for what it is. Oh well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 05:22 pm:

Sorry to hear that. Now that it's over could you post a photo or link to it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 05:27 pm:

Don't give up, maybe the winning bidder won't complete the deal and you'll get a second chance offer from the seller. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Woodcock on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 05:36 pm:

Here's the link. http://www.govliquidation.com/auction/view?auctionId=8875556&convertTo=USD

They sell T's all the time, let sold a near-show worthy speedster for around $5,900 late last year. Maybe they'll have another T come across their lot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

"I figured that the price was too high for what it is."

Robert -- I think you did well by not bidding more. There are lots of TT's around, and they are not in high demand. Keep looking, and a nicer one will cross your path worth the money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 10:15 pm:

I agree with Mike. There are more of them around than you may think. A couple of years ago there were half a dozen for sale at Chickasha, plus a lot of parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Tuesday, January 20, 2015 - 01:23 am:

Im restoring a 23 roadster and was thinking i might just stop and switch up for a TT just coz iwant something putt around in
Plus i thinking i have less invested and more ability to cobble thing together as from what im seeing car not done correctly have less value but a trucks value doesnt change if you doing this atleast period correct
Just hoping if i do a tt i can get 35 out of it
Warford and 5to1 gearing probly use AA rear wheels if i cant find correct ones
Just curiose i have seen some tt with two aux trannys any thoughts on this setup


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