Old Photo - The Corner Store

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - The Corner Store
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:34 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:45 pm:

We had a place just like this in our "neighborhood" when we moved to Kirkland
in 1969. It was called "Lottsville Cash and Carry" and was complete, right down
to the Model T's and visible gas pumps. It closed the following year and I never
realized the treasure it was until it was gone. What a great photo. Remember when
America was just plain awesome ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

Can you remember the worn wooden floors and the squeaky screen door. The giant in an apron, his voice booming "Whatcha gonna have kid?" Yeah, Them was good times.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

The place like Richard mentions that was in our town was run by Steve Fetsch. He had taken over the store that Charlie Clausner had on Main Street in St. Peters Mo.
The floorboards were worn on the three isles in the store. There were yellow footprint stickers up and down the isles on the floor and a message that said: "I'd walk a mile for a Camel". You could come in the front door say "Hi" to Steve who was in the back at the butcher counter where there was an enormous round three legged butcher block that the top was uneven from many years of use. It had a definite swale in it. The store was a little building but it had a lot of things in it.
You could get a soda and a candy bar and go out the back screen door by shoving on the push bar that said Seven-Up on it and as you were walking away hear the door slam shut. The St. Peters Ball Park was on the street behind the store.
Those were good times for a kid on a bicycle.
To day the store is Mike's Archery Shop. You can go in there and Mike will say 'Hi" when you walk in. If he has a few customers ahead of you, you can sit in one of the captain chairs that came out of the Legion Hall restaurant when they got new ones a few years ago and wait your turn. I keep telling Mike he should get a wooden barrel with a checker board on top. He doesn't think that is a good idea because nobody would leave and the place would turn into a gathering spot. That probably wouldn't happen. He doesn't sell candy bars or soda in glass bottles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 11:08 pm:

Hey Burger...
Was Lottsville east of town up on Rose hill?
Just east of 124th Ave. and a little north of the Kirkland-Redmond road.
My inlaws lived at 100th St. and 124th Ave from about '50 to '80.
I remember the name Fred Lott and just wondered how good my memory is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 12:14 am:

You nailed it, Bob !

Lottsville was still standing, although substantially altered over time. It was just east
of the corner of 100th and 130th by Mark Twain Elementary School, where I started the
3rd grade in 1969.

I cannot remember Mrs. Lott's first name, but Mr. Lott was "Fred". She ran the store,
although blind. He ran the repair shop and wrecking yard that was what put Vintage Auto
Parts in business after Fred passed away. The place was buried in 1910-30 era cars.

Years later my brother and I, tired of hearing rumors of "the old Packard" chased it down
in Fred's basement, now the property of his grandson. It was a big town sedan, 1923.
Beautiful car with a brown mohair interior and jump seats. Fred used it until 1947 as his
parts chaser and then parked it in the basement, put it up on blocks, and filled the cylinders
with oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 12:16 am:

Where your inlaws the Montgomerys or the Primeaus ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 12:55 am:

My inlaws are still the Primeaus...married into that bunch in '60. Wifey has 13 siblings.
I went to school with Jon and Terry Jarvis who started Vintage Auto Parts.
Bought quite a bit of T parts from them in the '50s & '60s mostly before VAP.
Small world!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 01:26 am:

Small world indeed. Ma and Pa bought the old Downing farm off of old Newcastle Road
(132nd) at 108th. I moved away in 1980 after graduating high school. After 1970, the area
rapidly was buried in housing developments and sprawl. I suppose you have an interesting
inside story on the standoff with the Primeaus and the County over the widening of 124th
back about 1971 (?).

Just up the road at 108th, you could go up the hill about 1/4 mile and an old farm there
was owned by Mrs. Miller. She had dementia real bad, but could tell you where everything
was around the area in 1915. I loved to talk to her, as she talked as if she could just go down
to the pier in Kirkland, catch the ferry to Madison, ride the trolley down to Yesler, and catch
a steamer to go see her mother in London ! Inside her house it was still 1930. She had a TT
truck in her barn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 09:44 am:

My wife and I got to the standoff after it was over and her dad and a couple brothers got hauled to jail. (I'm no fighter...glad I missed it)
The county had wanted the property for several years (at a low-ball price) for a fire station.
It boiled down to the Primeaus wanted to raise pigs on their property and the county didn't want them to.
Long story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 11:11 am:

In the early 90s we lived in the South Deerfield General Store and Grange Hall. It was on Middle Rd, South Deerfield, NH. The 2nd floor was the no longer used Grange Hall while the first floor was converted to a home. The storage area had been turned into kitchen, bath and bedroom but the original store front was an open living room. You could see where the pickle barrels were on the floors and where the floor was worn behind the counter where the cashier worked, walking back and forth. There was even an old wooden (working)phone booth in one corner. We loved that place (on 285 acres) but couldn't afford to heat it, even at 90s oil prices!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 11:39 am:

Fred Lott was a good friend of my fathers back in the day. They were both in the automotive electrical repair business.

Fred's Packard was a converted sedan to deliver his rebuilt generators and starters plus rewound armatures.

The back seat had cubby holes made out of angle iron welded together to hold his inventory in place. Fred was an old time rebuilder of electrical parts and actually had a route around the city of Seattle. He would pick up repair and deliver or exchange starters generators and rewound armatures to shops and parts stores around the northwest.

At the same time the junk man in him, would come to play and when his customers had old obsolete parts to get rid of Fred would haul them back to the shop and shelve them for sale in the future. As he got older and no longer ran his route he relied on early restorers to come by and purchase from his obsolete inventories.

The business alongside the grocery was called Eastside Battery. In the late 60's after Fred passed on the family held an auction. A 3 day event with parts mostly being sold by the shelf unit. While Vintage Auto Parts did purchase lots of parts, as we all did, this sale did not give them their start, they already had lots of inventory and a retail/wholesale business operating 1st on Roosevelt Ave in Seattle then they moved out to Woodinville.

Most interesting was the tent where there were tables of old catalogs. These were the last items to be sold. All thru the sale people that had purchased parts were sand bagging catalogs matching their purchases in special piles so they could get the catalogs needed to match their parts. As I remember their were 25 piles or lots of catalogs. When the auctioneer got to the table he offered the 1st lot. Terry at Vintage bid and purchased the lot, then the auctioneer asked if he wanted anymore of the catalogs at his bid price. Terry said yes I will take them all. So all the people that bought parts through the sale were left out in the cold, lots of parts no way to identify. A very smart business man, later on he purchased parts from some of the buyers at greatly reduced prices, again a very smart operator.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


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