Battery carrier

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Battery carrier
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 04:50 pm:

Going through Some parts today that my Dad has been accumulating and found this old model T battery carrier/box , odd that the end takes two robots , looks to be new old stock or aftermarket ?? I'm new but have never seen one of these , does anyone know what year or if it's aftermarket ? Cannot find ford script so far , thanks , going to post pics of the 26 tudor in Boiled linseed oil soon .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold R Carpenter - Fair Grove, MO on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 06:34 pm:

It is a standard battery carrier for most T cars from 1919 -1927. It is readily available from the standard T suppliers such as Lang's (Page 123 in the current catalogue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:01 pm:

Right , I was just curious about the twin rivets as most of the ones that I've seen and all of the ones that I have only have one , spell correct put robots in for some reason , better check that better lol . Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:05 pm:

If its NOS then the strap thickness is uniform. If its been used, then some of the strap thickness is likely corroded away and the thickness will be thinner at the corners and the bottom.Anybody converting a non starter car to electric start likely will need one of these. Even if the strap is corroded to almost nothing it can be readily repaired. I have reinforced mine on both cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:27 pm:

It looks to have never been installed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:35 pm:

Could be a very early one, 1918?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

Never have seen one that had a "double" leg on the long arm ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

Right ? That's what I found different also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 01:21 am:

I have never seen one like it either. For what it is worth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 02:09 pm:

From the stand point of making one, each leg is the same and just flipped. It does require more material and there is no reason that you would have to have both holes drilled in the frame. If not an off the shelf replacement from a non Ford seller, my idea of a very early one still sounds good, Henry's penny caused the single bolt type that is most commonly seen(IMHO).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 02:49 pm:

I went out and looked at Ford carriers and all I have (6) are like this -


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

All of mine are of the single type as well as well as the ones that I have in chassis , I've never seen a double armed one like this and think the early scenario is probably a correct one . Just fun the things we find , we've had this one for probably 10 years as in talking to my father , I remembered the place we bought it and that place has been gone at least that long .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 07:31 pm:

I'm wondering whether it has to do with being reversible for RHD cars. Is their battery on the other side?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 07:46 pm:

Nope, can't reverse, muffler is on the other side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

I have always felt that 1/2 of these imponderables would be answered with a good copy of WESTERN AUTO catalogue :-):-)

I had one once before I took my T's serious and the one I had has been lost to a flood somewhere along the line and years...I do recall that they had unscripted blocks...unscripted heads...light systems that looked just like the Fords...and a host of other things that looked like Ford and probably felt like Ford...but had never seen a Ford factory :-)

I'm guessing because I can't remember seeing it before...but if you bought a non-starter equipped car I'll bet you didn't get the battery frame...just the holes!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 09:52 pm:

Frank -- Thanks for clearing that up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 05:33 pm:

So...aftermarket ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 05:54 pm:

Who has the earliest starter equipped closed T from the spring of 1919? Check the battery carrier if it's the same style as the later ones. It would be very odd if nothing was changed at all from start to end of production. Using two of the same part is rational and cutting one of them may have been an early rationalisation that saved lots of material.

It's not self evident a single piece of flat iron is strong enough to carry a heavy battery, though the frame helps holding the carrier suspended between the side members so one is indeed enough. But that may have been a realisation that came after some testing when production already had started? Starter cars were low volume from the beginning, the option wasn't available for open cars until model year 1920 from august 1919.

(Message edited by Roger K on January 12, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Monday, January 12, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

Last night I went thru a 1924 copy of the WA Auto Supply Book. I found no pictures of any battery carrier. Not under battery stuff or in the "FORD" parts section.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration