Fun porjects safety hub question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Fun porjects safety hub question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 03:07 am:

The set of Fun project safety hubs I am installing in one of my customers car has needle bearings on the inboard end. I looked at the install directions and don't see this needed information. Do I still install a set of seals in the tubes first?
Thanks
MarkG


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 08:29 am:

I haven't seen any safety hubs at Fun Project's webpage? They concentrate mostly on pinion bearings and electrical items.

Could it be safety hubs from Texas T parts or Dan McEachern?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 10:13 am:

A search of the FP website finds no hubs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 10:36 am:

Mark,

I don not believe in using the needle bearings in that application. I have suggested to fellow chapter members that they be removed. Just my opinion.

I believe most of the safety hub assemblies already have a lip seal at their innermost end. Do your hubs have only the needle bearings and no seals at all?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 10:43 am:

Why use safety hubs in the first place?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 11:25 am:

It's no fun loosing a rear wheel.. And it did happen back when the cars were new too - From the reminisces of John Wandersee, a long time Ford employee and metallurgist:

"For instance, when we were using chrome vanadium steel for the rear axle of the Model T car, after we had about 10,000,000 cars on the road, you could drive from here (Highland Park) downtown (Detroit) any day you wanted to and see two or three rear wheels laying on the pavement.

Better material (EE steel) helped, but still Ford redesigned to three quarter floating hubs for the model A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 11:44 am:

Sorry it was late when I asked the question and had Fun Project's on my mind. They are from Texas T Parts. Wire wheel safety hubs.
These have a modern lip seal on the outside along with the O-rings that ride against the axle tube. There is a hole in the locking channel that would allow grease to get to the needle bearings from the grease cup. It does not look like the axle rides on the needle bearing so I am guessing it is there in case of axle breakage. The axle would ride on it helping prevent the wheel from wobbling too much depending on where the break happened.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 02:47 pm:

When I put these on my wood spoke 26, I had to work on my axles to get the needle bearing to slide over the axle. When you install the floating hubs, you do not use grease cups any more. You lock the floating hub in place with a bolt and lock nut. Check your installation instructions. If the wire hubs uses extra screws to secure the hub to the wheel/Ford hub, use them. they are critical when installing on floating hubs. It isn't a bad idea to get the installation tools from them as well. It helps in attaching the floating hub to the wheel/Ford hub.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 06:39 pm:

Mark

Sounds like yours are made by Model T Ranch. (John Stolz) (sp) out of Texas. I have ran a few sets, seems to be a good product.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 06:52 pm:

John, Per the instructions, you drill and tap for a new bolt to hold these in and yes there is a hole for the grease. No extra screws, just the lug bolts to hold the drums and wheels.

Mike;
per my 2ed post, yes Texas T.

"The grease cup is removed so that you may see the location of the Retaining Groove in the Inner Sleeve Bearing Support. Center punch a mark on the outside of the axle housing for drilling a hole for the retaining bolt. The retaining bolt should be centered in the Retaining Groove. The assembly is removed and a hole is drilled and tapped through the axle brake drum housing and the steel tubing as shown in the sketch."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 10:34 pm:

Mark,

The machinist that did my rear end removed the grease cups and but the locking bolts there. From what you say from the instructions there still would be a lube point if he had followed the instructions. Unfortunately when I had to replace the safety hubs (long story) I tried to line up the hole in the hub with the hole where the grease cups were so I could occasionally insert some grease but was unable to do so. The nice thing about a needle bearing is it doesn't require a great deal of lube. I made sure to pack it well with synthetic grease when I installed them.


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