Is fender/body welting period correct for Ts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Is fender/body welting period correct for Ts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 10:08 am:

I know Ts did not use fender welting. But is it correct for the teens era. Im thinking about using it on the speedster project. It will work perfect to give a nice clean joint between the rear deck and the trunk box, as well as the trunk to back of body. I think it will also work well for the gas tank to body seal. Being my body is non ford I think its use would be correct to use, if it is from the era. I think I can also get it in a grey color to match my galvanize body . I would use it in the areas highlighted in red in the photo(maybe a little straighter):-) I believe it will work, and look good, but I want to be as period correct as possible .. The type of welt I show in the photos is the modern style, but I think I can still get the style with the cord in it .. Either style will work ...

welt 1

welt 2

body pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 10:11 am:

They used welting where the turtle deck mated with the body on the improved roadsters and I remember seeing it on other cars if this helps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 10:17 am:

No, and certainly not plastic!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 10:42 am:

Im not going to use the plastic type. Its all I had to take a pic of. There is a pebble grain type of corded welt listed for 1928 to 1960s era chevy cars and pickups. I was unaware of the welt used on the Improved models turtle deck. Ill have to see if I can find a part number for it .. Please remember, Im not asking if it is correct on model Ts as Henry built them, but if it was used in the 20s era. If it was used on the Improved models that would be great ..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 10:46 am:

What I find works very well and doesn't show when the car is assembled is the old fashoned cloth friction tape. This is a woven tape with some kind of black tar which was used for taping electric wires. I just put some in between each joint before I bolt it together. Repels water and eliminates noisy vibrations.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:05 am:

Hi Donnie,

I too, strive for period correctness (at least the appearance of it) in what ever I do with the old cars. I have to agree with Larry that welt is not really period correct until you get into the late 20's. G.R. is right about the on the improved roadsters, but I think that it was flat and not having a beaded edge.

I think that Norman's suggestion of using cloth friction tape is good AND would be era correct. With a layer or two of it, placed just inboard of the edge so as to not be seen, you would eliminate squeeks and have a nice looking even and very close gap at those places where panels and parts meet.

Good luck with your project. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:19 am:

Here are a couple of pictures from earlier threads:

NOS improved turtle deck with welting:
nos turtle

Detail from an original improved runabout:
original runabout detail

Looks like top or upholstery material folded and glued around a piece of string?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:23 am:

Donnie, when I took apart my barn-fresh 1927 coupe for the first time, it had normal-looking fender welt on the side edges of the dash which I believe was factory installed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:25 am:

"Looks like top or upholstery material folded and glued around a piece of string?"

I was going to suggest that you could make your own using any type and color of fabric you like, and wrap it around some cord. Glue the flaps together, and you're good to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 11:39 am:

If you are going to make your own welting, the leatherette tape should be cut on the bias so it it doesn't pucker or wrinkle around the curves.

Leatherette binding tape that is cut on the bias is readily available but it is not very wide. It can be used with or without a cord.

You can put sisal, twisted paper cord, cotton cord or modern plastic cord inside it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 01:23 pm:

The picture of the welt on the Improved Model Turtle deck is interesting. I was unaware of any kind of welting being used by Ford. The anti-squeak is not the main thing Im looking for. I just like the looks of the bead at the seam. I had a 1925 Franklin that had welt in several place on the body, It appeared to be a canvas type of material with some kind of sealer/treatment to make it somewhat water proof. I have found several types of welt for sale. There are rubber, cloth, vinyl, plastic, The style sold for the early Chevrolets is a treated cloth material around a cord. It looks like what may be in the turtle deck photos above. My speedster has a 1925 engine in it. But a speedster with that vintage engine in it was probably made at a later date. My body could easily be from the late 20s or early 30s time frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 03:30 pm:

I just bought a modern vinyl welt with an embossed pattern in it to simulate the old cloth type. It has a plastic tube inside which isn't as pliable at the old twisted paper filling, but it will take the bends without collapsing much at all.







This car was painted in 1965 and here is the welting on it. It has a kind of twisted paper core. I suspect this welt is not original but it's at least 50 years old at any rate.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 04:22 pm:

The embossed vinyl welting is a pain in the butt. It holds any polish used on the paintwork and is an absolute pain to clean it out of the embossing. I have given up and leave it looking like it is permanently dusty grey.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 05:17 pm:

Donnie,
If you don't have an upholstery sewing machine--or an old White Rotary treadle machine, which can handle this stuff--you can get a local upholstery shop to make you some welting--and then you can pick color and grain of the vinyl from which they will make it.
Also, by having it made, you can choose the diameter of the cord it's wrapped around, in case you want a larger or smaller welt.
And YES, it is period correct for some applications. Ford tended to use cloth friction tape between metal pieces for an anti-squeak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 08:16 pm:

I may have some made at the local upholstery shop if I can not get grey already made. Im wanting it to blend in with the original aged galvanize body of the speedster. Since my car is staying in "patina finish" The permanent dusty grey Allen speaks of is a "plus" for me. I was fairly sure that some form of welt was used in the 20s but the time line for it and my cars age is close. The use of welting will also give me some more options as to sealing the gas tank to the body, so as to at least slow down the water running into the trunk. I really do feel better about using it now that I know the 26-27s had it in the same place as Im going to be using it.


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