Carburetor

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Carburetor
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jason macintyre on Sunday, January 18, 2015 - 10:53 pm:

Has anyone experimented with a carburetor off an 8N ford on a
model t?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Monday, January 19, 2015 - 08:17 am:

I have one but I haven't made a manifold for it yet. The bore is about 1/16 larger than the T carbs but the real benefit is the ability to set it and forget it. I suspect it would improve performance as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jason macintyre on Monday, January 19, 2015 - 08:22 am:

I asked the question via email to Stan Howe his response was as follow

"Too small.  It's built for a 134 cubic inch engine."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Monday, January 19, 2015 - 10:34 pm:

I just bought a new carb for my '58 Ford 860 with a 172cu.in. motor and according to the catalogs the same carb is used for the 134 motor too. The catalog says carb is used from '47 to '59 regardless of motor size. Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, January 20, 2015 - 02:54 am:

The carbs are not interchangeable. The catalog is wrong if they say they are.

The 8N uses a TSX 33 or TSX 214. Most 9N's used a TSX 33 but some early 9N's used an earlier model of Schebler carb, a TSX 25.

The NAA & early 600 tractors used the Marvel-Schebler TSX428 & TSX580. The later 600-700 series use the Marvel-Schebler TSX765.

The 800 and 900 series Fords with the 172 Cubic inch engine use the TSX769 or TSX 813 carburetor. It is larger both physically and in capacity than the carbs for the 134 cubic inch engine. The kit to rebuild all of them is often sold as a universal repair kit but there are several differences in the internal passages and fuel feeds.

Incidentally, the carb kits for the TSX 33 and 214 are not interchangable even tho they now only manufacture one kit for them, the one correct for the 214. If you install the kit in the TSX 33 the engine will not idle. You must drill the idle jet to the correct size, .036. The idle jet as supplied is drilled .028.

My current fleet. 1940 9N, 1953 Jubilee, 1955 600, 1958 801, 1960 2000.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:18 am:

I've heard the original Model T carburetor can only allow enough airflow into the engine to make 25 hp, naturally aspirated. A multiple-carb setup is about the only way to create enough air-fuel mixture into the engine to make higher horsepower. Perhaps an 8N carb or two, with a custom manifold to make it work with a Model T engine, might make some interesting results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:06 am:

You don't have to resort to tractor parts. Take a look at John Housego's dual carbs.

http://www.modelt.org/mtfcivb/showthread.php/889-Speedster-test-run


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:35 am:

Well, like grandma used to say, Every cripple dances their own kind of jig, but I fail to see any advantage to running Schebler TSX 214 carbs on anything other than an 8 N Ford tractor. They are a very primitive carb, designed for industrial applications where the speed of the engine is mostly constant, they have no accelerating circuit and very little more airflow, if any, than any stock T carb.

There are thousands of carburetors from the era of the Model T that run just fine. There were somewhere around 200 accessory carbs made specifically for T's. Many of them flow less air than the original T carbs, they just flow it better and have better atomizing capability, circuitry and adjustability.

There are hundreds of non-T carbs available that work very well on dual application. The trick is to use carbs that are small enough to still allow the engine to start, idle and accelerate along with having high flow.

I've said this every time somebody posts one of those flow charts that tells how much air you can blow through a carburetor venturi supposedly showing which is the best carburetor. The amount of air that will flow through a venturi is but a SMALL PART of how the carburetor will perform in service. EVERY carburetor is a compromise between starting, low speed, high speed, accelerating and economy. NO carburetor does ALL of those things perfectly.

However, it ain't my deal. I wouldn't do it but I'm not saying you shouldn't. I would actually be interested to hear the results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 11:04 am:

To answer Jason's initial question . . . Nope . . . but I've installed one of Jack Daron's restored NH straight through carbs on my 1919 Fordson. Makes it go a dangerously fast 13 miles an hour in 3rd gear!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 11:11 am:

I'm glad I'm not on it at that speed!!!!


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