T Emergency Ignition Coil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: T Emergency Ignition Coil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Hotton on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 01:33 am:

Hi All,

Does anyone have any ideas on this "coil"?

On the cover it says "Renrade Emergency Ignition Coil".

I'm guessing it's a Model T accessory?

It had a little hard rubber switch on it that sticks out of the cover. Unfortunately the switch knob crumbled & broke off when I moved it.

Inside the cover it looks like a standard T coil without it's wooden case.
I can't get the coil out, as the pitch has stuck it to the tin case.

It has a couple of clips on it that look like they would clip it onto the posts on a coilbox(?).

Does anyone know how this "emergency" coil would be hooked up, or used?
It has a couple of long, old original looking wires coming out of it.

Has anyone else seen one before; or does anyone have any old adverts for it.

I've looked through the T accessory book by Kenealy, but have drawn a blank there.

Sam.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Hotton on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 01:41 am:

With the cover off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Hotton on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 01:43 am:

Side view


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 01:57 am:

My guess is the alligator clips secure it to the rod between the radiator and firewall. The thick wire is undoubtedly for the spark plug while the other two connect to the timer and battery/magneto.
Given the vibrator points present, it does seem to be a Model T accessory.

In practice, one would remove the defective coil from the coil box and connect this accessory to the relevant coil box terminals and hang it from the radiator rod. The timer and battery/magneto wires don't seem to be marked, but I can't see it being a problem if they are transposed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 02:43 am:

Not mine but funny you would post this one because;
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Model-T-Model-A-KW-Emergency-Ignition-Coil-/321647499052 ?pt=Vintage_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item4ae3af572c&vxp=mtr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 03:17 am:

I don't think that this is really intended to be used to aid a Model T with a bad coil. If your T developed a bad coil you would simply remove it and insert a replacement.

This emergency coil, and the one referenced on ebay were available through the 30's and possibly into the war years and a bit further. It was intended to be used on cars with a conventional distributor and coil ignition system which succumbed to an ignition fault. This unit would be hooked up (follow the supplied instructions) and you could get home or to a repair shop.

My two cents worth. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Hotton on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 06:18 am:

Bill,

The Renrade coil I have posted pics of here, will ONLY work on a Model T.

You can't just swap out a standard automobile coil from an ordinary points/distributor/coil system; & substitute it with a Model T style buzzer coil, & have it work on that auto.

That Renrade buzzer coil will only work on a car, like a Model T, that has ignition set up for buzzer coil.

I can't comment on that other KW Emergency coil, being able to be swapped out for an "ordinary" ignition coil or not, as I don't know if it's a buzzer coil; or an ordinary coil. You can't tell from those pics the Seller has posted.

Yes, you would think that back in the day, to just carry a spare coil or 2 would solve any ignition problems that might come up on the side of the road. But, the accessory T market being what it was; I can only guess that someone saw an opening to market another T accessory!

I'm keen to find out a bit more about my Renrade coil, if anyone has any other thoughts or info.

Sam.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:11 am:

"Renrade Emergency Ignition Coil" Is from 1936-37 and is intended for a non-Ford T. The hot(spark) wire is to go into the distributor, replacing the ignition coil wire. It is intended to by pass the condenser, coil and points. It will provide a "emergency run mode." This is an earlier version of a (circa 1980)emergency ignition using a 555 ic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:25 am:

George,

Thank you.
I have see ads for such units but can't find any right now. I also seem to recall a "Model Garage" story in Popular Mechanics in which a car with an ignition problem is limped back to the shop with a T coil.

"Just because no one agrees with you doesn't mean that you are wrong." Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:30 am:

Same idea of the 1930 emergency ignition coil using a buzz coil.

Super Simple ignition coil drivers : 555 timer driver www.instructables.com410 329Search by image another coil driver is the popular, 555 timer driver.

Will only be serviceable on ignitions with points and rotators. Not for ECU related ignitions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:33 am:

New day, a chance for me to learn something...
what is : ".....a non-Ford T

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:45 am:

I agree with George and the others that say it is for distributors with points type ignition set ups. There are several different versions of this type of item being sold thru the years. Repair men, tow truck drivers, car owners, repo men and thieves, would use these to retrieve a car (or steal one). With one of these you do not even need a key to get the car all you have to do is hook the unit to a hot wire and ground, replace the coil wire to the distributor with the units wire, turn the engine over, by pushing the car, hand crank, or jumping the solenoid. and drive away. The made similar types of items all the way into the late 50s. Ill try to post a pic later, of a different version that I have. The only confusing thing about yours are the two "alligator" clips. I can not tell what they are wired to. Are they the ground or negative side of the coil. ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:50 am:

Sorry. In reference to this forum. A "non-Ford" is not a Model T Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 11:01 am:

I suspect that the alligator clips are present only to allow the unit to be suspended from the radiator to cowl rods prevalent on many 30's and 40's cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 12:28 pm:

George, In the "Ignition coil driver circuit" diagram, why is the coil negative terminal connected to the 12V +?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 07:38 pm:

Ken Todd. I did not design the circuit. The output transistor is a npn design and acts as a switch. This type of transistor determines how it is connected to a power supply and load. The solid state design determines how it is connected to the load - the ignition coil.
see: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_3/chpt_4/2.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Sunday, January 25, 2015 - 11:03 pm:

Like I said there's a set of Ford coil points - see the 2nd last photo. Unless these are shorted out, the unit is no good for distributor fitted cars.


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