Carburetor restoration tools

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Carburetor restoration tools
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:36 am:

All the vendors sell the seat and jets for Kingston and Holly carburetors ... but does anyone sell the wrenches needed to remove and install them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:44 am:

I don't think so. When I took a machine class I made some for myself. The MTFCA carburetor book has a few ideas, but I'd like to see more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:44 am:

I haven't seen any, but they should.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:48 am:

An ignored market.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 11:02 am:

Jack Daron makes a seat removal tool for the NH and maybe others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leonard J Evansic on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 06:17 pm:

I am not in the business, but when I set my machines up to make a set for the Holly G, a few years ago, I got carried away and made 10 sets. The design is my own, and they worked well on the G. My car is a 15 and the only one i was interested in at the time. They are made in the USA.---Len


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 07:01 pm:

Leonard -- If you still have a spare set, I'd be interested. waterwalk999@gmail.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JD, Wichita, KS on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 07:35 pm:

Here are some of my homemade tools.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 09:12 pm:

Leonard: I run G's and I too would be interested. Send me a PM. Thanks, Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 10:39 pm:

Handy looking tools, Leonard. I'll see if I can get a decent photo of my G seat removal tool. I've had to redo the tip several times, it's probably due again.

OK, here is a FREE TIP!! Just like the old Tinkering Tips from back when the Vintage Ford actually had articles about how to do things to a T. I learned a lot from them. Some things to do and some things not to do.

But I digress.

A seat removal tool is easy to make for a G. Just turn a taper on the end of a small shaft the size of the outer lip of the G about 5 inches long with the taper the right angle to fit in those funny slots on the edge of the G seat. Then drill it to accept a small piece of rod the same size as the G needle. Then machine it off so it leaves those slanted tangs so they will just fit in the slots on the G needle. Press the rod in so it sticks out a little less than the depth of the needle hole. That will hold it in position. Now machine the upper end small enough that it will fit in your drill press chuck. Cross drill the main shaft so you can insert a handle. To use it, insert the tool in the drill press, put the G body in the drill press vice and press down HARD while turning the handle. It will turn out the seat without stripping the edges of the seat or slipping. The down pressure is very important to making it work. If you need to, you can give it a little heat through the inlet hole or along the body of the carb. It will break loose. Haven't had one yet I couldn't get out with this tool doing it this way.

It may also help to heat the seat while it is in the carb body, then put it in the drill press and turn it out.


I have a whole bunch of tools for different seats that fit in my drill press. I find it to work much better than just trying to turn them out free hand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 12:56 am:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 10:59 am:

Stan -- That's a good tip about using a drill press for pressure. It also holds the tool straight. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 11:21 am:

Thanks, much of the time the trick in rebuilding a carb is getting it apart without damaging anything or spending half a day doing it. Once you get it all apart and get it cleaned up the rest of the rebuild doesn't take much time or effort if you didn't mess something up getting it apart. Fixing what you broke or ruined trying to get it apart will usually take a bunch of time. Ask me how I know that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 11:24 am:

A few carbs waiting:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 01:16 pm:

Here are a few carburetor tools made from an old drive shaft.


Holley G spray nozzle


NH spray nozzle
Note how the old nozzle has been chewed up by a screwdriver.


NH float valve seat


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leonard J Evansic on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 07:26 pm:

The Holly G tools are spoken for. Mike, Bill, Warren, and Tim, I will e-mail you with the details.---Len.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 08:32 pm:

Thanks Leonard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, January 23, 2015 - 09:28 pm:

I was hoping you would show the tools you made, Leonard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard on Saturday, January 24, 2015 - 10:04 am:

I just asked Jack Daron about an NH valve seat tool. He does not have any for sale and does not plan to make any more. I've got my valve out, was hoping to get a tool to install the new one without buggering up the slot. Looks like I'll have to try to make my own tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Saturday, January 24, 2015 - 10:08 am:

Now I've got yet another reason to get my great grandfather's machines cleaned up. Pretty sure that man could build anything. I love seeing everybody's homemade tools. Anybody else got any cool carburetor tools to show?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, January 24, 2015 - 10:16 am:

You young guys need to realize that you can't spend 3-4 hours making something that would only sell for $10-15. I can spend my time much better, I used to make oil can holders,same story,no one wanted to pay more than $6 for them,so I quit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Saturday, January 24, 2015 - 11:21 am:

This is great. I made the tool but I have yet to learn how to extract the particularly recalcitrant Holley G spray nozzles without twisting the top birdbath section off of the lower threaded section. Is anyone making new Holley G bird baths (AKA spray nozzles)?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, January 24, 2015 - 11:38 am:

Jack, seems like a lot of people in the hobby think every thing about a Model T is just a hobby and don't want to pay for the time it takes to do something right. Not everybody, of course, but quite a few are like that.

I'm sorry you are not making that NH seat tool anymore. I don't know if you remember but you sent me one when I first started doing carbs ten or twelve years ago and I have used it and used it and used it. A little heat and an Unca Jack Seat Remover tool and it screws right out.

I also think those tools are more important now than they used to be. The better quality unrestored carbs are in shorter and shorter supply and people are now down to the box of junk they threw under the bench and forgot 30 years ago. They are missing parts, rusty and corroded, very few are complete and many are bent or dented. And the seats are stuck, stuck, stuck. If you are not careful and have good tools you can pretty easily ruin a carburetor body by buggering up the seat area trying to get the seat out and on some carbs it is easy to crack the body.

Somebody should tool up to make some quality sets, not just reground screwdrivers or soft iron seat removal tools -- good tools with hardened tips and correct fit.

If I didn't spend so much time in front of the computer reading the forum I would take pics of some of my special tools I've made and post them. Since I don't, I'll just offer a little tip.

It is hard to find a wide screwdriver that fit the jets in many carbs. A cheap and easy supply of hard steel is a set of those flat wood bits like they sell for drilling through studs to install wiring. Dewalt has a set for less than $15 at Lowes. Since you get half a dozen sizes you can grind the closest size to just fit in the screw slot. You can leave the little tit on the end, it will help hold the bit in place. If you have a drill press, put the bit in the chuck and press it hard down into the screw slot. Either lock or hold it down while you use an adjustable wrench on the flat to turn it. It helps if you have a vise on your drill press table to hold the carb body. It also helps if you heat the area with a propane torch. The jet will screw right out. If you don't have a drill press, just heat the stem of the tool and bend it to make a handle. The closer to the end of the boss the jet is in is best. The bend gives you a place to hold down hard with one hand and the handle lets you unscrew the jet easily with far more control than you can get with a screwdriver.

Off to the shop. Working on an OF, a Rayfield and an OX-2 that is going to Italy Monday.


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