Bridgeport tire pump

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Bridgeport tire pump
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Does any one have any documentation on the bridge port tire pump showing when the bolt and clip holding the hose on was changed to a crimped end.
I have a drawing that shows the crimped end.
What color was the hose,Black or red?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 09:37 pm:

Check with John Regan,he's looked into them before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 10:58 pm:

Pete

According to Mark Eyre, his article in Model T Times, Jan/Feb 2007 states the hose is red, similar to carbide tank hose. Also the metal parts up by the handle are brass plated, the base is painted red. The height should be 19" from the base to the top of the handles for early, as around 1916 the pump got shorter.

He put prints in the issue, and in the Mar/April 2007 issue, but can't tell from my CD copy what the fasteners for the hose are, crimps do show in the 1916 print.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

Dan, I read the article that Mark wrote.When I did my car I did the pump with crimped ends and a red
hose.
I have since come up with two blu-prints of the pump. Both have crimped ends shown. On one print
the part no that points to the crimped ends have
pencil marks saying they were changed, but no date.
I have been told that the hose was originally a
dark cloth covered black hose with a brass clamp
with a brass screw. They say that the crimped ends
started around 1916. I am trying to get some proof when the change was.
See you on the Florida tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 10:13 am:

Pete

This may help. Here are some photos from Automobile of adv by Bridgestone. Early adv. in 1909-11 show the same collar, bolt and nut tubing fastener. Not real proof of the Ford specified versions of these double barrel pumps mfg by Bridgestone, but appears the brass collar and bolt and nut fastener on the tubing continued into 1915.


Bridgestone pump, 1912


Bridgestone pump family, 1915. The 'Aelous' one on the far right has been described as the model that Ford was supplied.

At 1915, at least according to this adv., the brass collar and bolt and nut were used on that lowest cost model.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 07:36 am:

Thanks Dan, I think you hit on a Jackpot.The pictures are not Blu-prints,But they are period.
I think they answer my question on the tire pump.
You can really find some imformaton


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Sunday, February 01, 2015 - 11:43 pm:

Usually "artist concepts" are drawn up very early since the advertising must preceed the thing being advertised. The above "pictures" are not pictures they are artist renderings and very expensive to make into plates for the magazines. Most companies of that era like Ford, Splitdorf, and others continued to use them well into and well past the introduction of the item which may have been very different. All ads I have seen for Delivery cars show the same artist rendering of a curved front roof and goofy rear end that never existed in any Delivery Car. Likewise I have a brochure from Splitdorf that shows coils in the picture that had not been made since before 1902 and the advertisement was in 1907 and not a single coil in the brochure was a current model. On the other hand an actual film picture like on Shorpy or any picture that has people or houses or something in it so you know it is a picture and not an artwork - now those are golden sources if they can be dated accurately. I welcome research but be very leery of artworks or you will chase a lot of butterflies since their only purpose was to sell things.


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