Old Photo - Hand Assembling The Chassis

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Hand Assembling The Chassis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 10:58 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

What a great wealth of detail here! I would have thought that the hub caps would have been installed right after the wheels were mounted to avoid contamination of the wheel bearings - not so in this picture.

This photo was doctored for publication but even so it seems to indicated that some parts of the motor were lighter colored than others. The water manifolds, water jacket & head actually have a sheen on them.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 01:12 pm:

Pure guess. Perhaps the reason the hub caps were not installed until later was to avoid dings and damage as the car progressed through the assembly process. They would stick out pretty far and be vulnerable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 02:05 pm:

Mr. Stan Howe:

What is the Carb and carb stove on this engine?

Respectfully, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, January 26, 2015 - 11:23 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/442321.html

Carbs (see 1913-14)
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/C-D.htm#Carb1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 02:03 pm:

Thanks, Ken. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 02:13 pm:

Looks like a posed photo set up. The background is more like a wall mural. Clean floor. Dirty air.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 02:16 pm:

Seems strange.... this is the famous "moving Assembly Line" that Ford developed.

The chassis is presumably moving down the line, guided by the left wheels being in some kind of trough. The right rear wheel is on a 'dolly' to allow the wheel to turn as the left-hand man turns the Universal to align with the engine as it is slipped into place by the right-hand man.

So, why is there a non-movable stand under the rear axle? That would inhibit the chassis from moving down the line.

I wonder why?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 03:13 pm:

That's the Dodge brothers! Their tearing up a Ford car and throwing parts around the building to screw up Henry's assembly line. They did that just before they left.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 06:41 pm:

Gary,

That looks like pretty standard of-the-era photo retouching. It could be a combination of working directly on the glass plate negative with different inks and painting on a print made from the retouched negative. The tyres look like they have been lightened and the background blocked out to bring up the subject.

The retouched photo would reproduce a lot better in newsprint etc than the original photo.

Andrew


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

That picture is also on page 148 of Bruce's book. Sure looks like the wheels have a pin strip in the book.

Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 09:05 pm:

Here is the above picture before the retouching. What may have appeared as pinstripes on the spokes in the above picture are now seen to be mere reflections in the glossy paint and seen even on the inner side of the left front wheel.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 09:21 pm:

The " Assembly line" went through a number of iterations before the continuous chain system was adopted. This is, the first or second iteration which was known as the "shove" system. The first operation was to put the axles on under the frame, followed closely by the wheels. The left front and rear wheels were guided by a track bolted to the floor made up of angle iron. The right rear wheel rode in the three wheel dolly shown in the image. The chassis was shoved from station to station.

At the engine installation station, the right rear axle was lifted up out of the dolly and a short axle stand was slipped under the axle enough so that the right rear wheel could turn. When the engine is being installed, one workman is turning the U-joint male end so it will fit into the transmission tail shaft. If the right rear wheel was not free to turn, turning the U-joint to fit into the tail shaft would be much more difficult. (Come on guys, you know this already from first hand experience).

One the engine was in place and bolted down, the axle was lifted just enough to remove the axle stand, and the right rear wheel dropped back down into the dolly. Then the chassis could be shoved down to the next station.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess - currently stranded in Dearborn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 09:34 pm:

Trent -- Thanks for that explanation. It all makes perfect sense now. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

And I ask you, how much time was spent mounting the firewall? Lets see, steering column to firewall, firewall and steering assembly to frame and body. Hood former to firewall, windshield brackets to firewall, horn into firewall, coil-box to firewall... Now tell me, by 1914 this line was called a "moving" assembly line, leaving plenty of time to perform a wedding with the firewall and engine to the point of recording engine numbers to match the wedding ceremony of the firewall. Really? (this point of view is completely mine, taken from other postings concerning firewall and engines having been matched during assembly). No wonder firewalls today cost more than the complete car back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 11:13 pm:

It really didn't take long to install the firewall. The firewall was installed as an assembly as the steering column, coil box hood former, firewall brackets and other bits were already attached to it.
Hopefully someone can post a few pictures of the firewall assembly stand/jig and the finished assembly being installed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 08:35 am:

Exactly Bill, that was my point. It has been stated in other posts that they took the time to record the engine number and that the firewall was married to each individual car with this recording going on as the car went down the line, I was just questioning this statement.(I think it was made just to hold up the price of some new firewalls being made at this time). One needs to read the statements in which I was referring, my error for not just posting in those posts.


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