5 popular myths about Ford and his Model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 5 popular myths about Ford and his Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Conte on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 04:29 pm:

http://www.autoblog.com/photos/5-popular-myths-about-ford-and-his-model-t/?icid= maing-grid7%7Cmaing17%7Cdl30%7Csec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D605574#image-1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 05:31 pm:

Well I'm no expert, but there seems to be as many errors in this article as the writer is claiming to debunk...

Page 2: A special license was required to operate a Model T in 1927??

Page 3: Implies Benz and Olds used moving assembly lines previous to Ford. I don't think so.

Page 4: Ford doubled wages from from the current $2.25/HOUR in 1913?? $2.25/DAY is more like it.

Page 5: Henry Ford "never" worked on the design of the Model T??

Page 6: "Rumor had it that Ford would send agents into junkyards to retrieve used parts and install them in new models to save money." I've only owned and been reading about Model Ts for 23 years ó perhaps some of the experienced members of the Forum can confirm if this is a rumor worthy of the description "popular myth".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 06:17 pm:

The way I read the article, it IS saying that #6 is a myth.

Also I think they already took #2 down (couldn't find it)

Another myth I heard (not in that article) is that Ford designed the T engine to run on alcohol or that it could be tuned to run on alcohol.

Fun post though - any more myths out there ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 06:43 pm:

The person that wrote this article doesnít know what he is writing about! Once again someone uses Charlie Sorensonís book as gospel, and it is not! During the design of the T, Sorenson was nothing but the pattern make at Ford not a draftsmen/engineer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 06:45 pm:

I read an article in "The Vintage Ford" several years ago that talked about California and several other states issuing drivers licenses stamped "For Model T Only". Perhaps the opposite of the article is true. There were licenses that allowed driving nothing BUT Model Ts.

If I recall correctly, the copy of the license shown had an issue date of 1951.

In 1947, my father ran the upholstery department at Young Brother's Mattress Co. in Providence, R.I.. He was earning $.36 an hour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 06:57 pm:

I remember my father make $4.25 an hour as a master electrician.

Wish some of that knowledge would have rubbed off!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Gold Country of Calif. on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 08:42 pm:

I plucked chickens in the early '50's for 25 or 50 cents per hour, can't remember which.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard A Eddinger on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 08:50 pm:

Heck I started out working for the Department of Defense for $2.12 a hour around 1953.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 09:25 pm:

No one person can claim the invention of the assembly line. Assembly line methods have been used through out history. Usually in the production of arms. Muzzle loaders used by both sides in the American Civil War were mass produced by England using assembly line methods.

Olds production jumped to about 2500 cars in 1902.

"Rudiments of mass manufacturing contributed to 1902's volume surge. Although Henry Ford would later perfect the moving assembly line, Olds had already developed many of its fundamental features. For example, the firm used wheeled carts that were moved from station to station for the various assembly steps. Ford merely mechanized this system to speed up the process."*

* Setting the Pace, Oldsmobile's first 100 years. By Helen Jones Early and James R. Walkinshaw.


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