Popcorn Truck- Smith form a truck question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Popcorn Truck- Smith form a truck question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Sellers on Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 11:13 pm:

I wouldn't mind building something like this "Dunbar" popcorn truck.

Maybe not with the Smith form-a-truck, unless I can find out everything needed.

Can a regular TT Chassis be used to mount all the rest of the Smith form-a-truck stuff on it?

What are all the parts needed? I noticed this;
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/3487/485483.html?1417802924

How much more is needed besides what was (and might still be) for sale? (link above)


I think I found my next project in line.


PopCornMobile_Dunbar_Smith-form-a-truck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 12:12 am:

I have an original Dunbar Steam engine from a pop corn wagon that I would be interested in selling

brasscarguy
206-919-1949(Seattle)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 07:13 am:

Nick,

If you used a regular Ford Ton Truck chassis you would NOT need any of the Smith Form-a-Truck parts. They were used to convert a car chassis to a One Ton Chain Drive truck chassis. There is an excellent thread showing the extension frame that is bolted to the car chassis, larger springs, extra axle etc. at the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/170128.html?1291412425

Yes, you could build a popcorn wagon on a Model T Ton Truck chassis. And I suspect different people built different versions of a truck with popcorn makers and other concessions for sale. Dunbar (still in business) was one of the companies producing horse drawn as well a vehicle popcorn stands see: http://www.dunbarpopcorn.com/dunbar-dunbar-popcorn-truck-model-4-on-chevrolet-1- 12-ton-truck-1929---1933.html Another company and competitor that built the popcorn poppers is still in business it is Cretors at http://www.cretors.com/ They would also build you a horse drawn wagon with their equipment and later offered trucks with their equipment. See: http://www.wyandotpopcornmus.com/cretors_model_TT.html for information on a 1927 TT that was originally fitted out by Cretors and purchased back for their museum. At the bottom of that page it has a note: “All of the Model TT Trucks (that Mr. Pearson has) have been restored except one which Mr. Pearson says is a basket case and may never be restored.” That might be a very special project for someone?

Both of those companies initially used a small steam engine to run the agitators for their popcorn machines (and other moving items in the wagon/truck).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 07:54 am:

Miners Company makes ready to go bodies.

http://www.minercompany.com/Popcorn%20Trucks.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 08:17 am:

Ed -- thanks! I didn't know I could order a new (restored) one. I wonder if I could convince Santa...

Note the car chassis has the black radiator introduced with the 1917 model year cars but also appears to still have the above the front axle wishbone that was discontinued during the 1919 model year. (ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/doc19.htm see first Apr 14, 1919 entry). So I believe the chassis is most likely a 1917 mid 1919 model year car chassis. Note Ford sold 41,105 ton truck chassis in 1918 and 70,816 in 1919 (ref http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1918.htm and http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1919.htm ) I would think an earlier rather than later year car chassis would have been used. So I would think it was more likely a 1917 or early 1918 date for what appears to be a new or relatively new “Dunbar” popcorn truck rather than a 1919 chassis just before they switched to the below the axle wishbone. But that is just a GUESS.

Nick – you mentioned “Smith Form-a-Truck.” Did you use that term generically or do you know that it is actually a “Smith Form-a-Truck” chassis? I would guess it is one – but I haven’t studied them or that picture enough to say for sure one way or the other. If someone familiar with the chain drive truck conversions could chime in and confirm it is or isn’t one – that would be great.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Sellers on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 11:37 am:

Hap, Thanks for the info!

The truck pictured is right here:

http://www.dunbarpopcorn.com/-model-3200-dunbar-popcorn-wagon-on-ford-model-ts-w ith-smith-form-a-truck-conversions-1916-1918.html

That link will bring up the original drawing and more info about the SMITH form a truck conversion used on the truck I posted a pic of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 05:06 pm:

Nick,

Thanks for pointing me to that section of the web site. They have a lot of information there. Note your original post you asked, " Can a regular TT Chassis be used to mount all the rest of the Smith form-a-truck stuff on it?"

If you wanted the chain drive and you wanted to make a replica of the Dunbar 1915-1918 then locating a Smith form-a-truck would be the best way to go. They are still out there. And the link I posted had at least two that were listed (chassis parts or link to parts) for sale.

You can also probably achieve a Chain drive look by having a large sprocket bolted and/or fitted to the 1918-1927 Model T Ton Truck rear brake drum. Run a chain from there to a false axle that has the smaller sprockets on it. Attach the chain. Most non-technical people would seldom figure out that the chain was being driven by the regular TT rear axle rather than the other way around. But if you are going to go to the effort to recreate one – I would suggest locating the Smith Form-a-Truck. I would estimate in less than two years you would find a good truck and/or parts needed to create a good truck. And of course you could build the later 1918-1927 style on a regular TT which is what Dunbar did.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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