What kind of parts you think should be reproduced or improved

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What kind of parts you think should be reproduced or improved
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 08:27 pm:

What kind of parts you think should be reproduced or improved..Now really think about it, It should be cost efficient for the mfg as well as the retailer & customer.

Now on the improvement side of the product "NO NAME BASHING ALLOWED" just a suggestion on a current product that needs improving...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 08:40 pm:

NH needle seat gaskets are way to hard and difficult to get a good seal on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 08:43 pm:

Clincher tires and tubes need improvement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison North of Iowa on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 08:47 pm:

Running shoes don't seem to hold up as well as they used to. And you're lucky to get even 400 hours out of light bulbs anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Robinson Salty Bottom, AL on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 09:11 pm:

How about seat rests/cones for Tudor seats?

See http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/514605.html?1422670068


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

Inner tubes available now are far inferior to the old ones. I have tubes decades old, even red ones, still serviceable. New ones rot away rapidly, particularly around the valve stem area. The metal stem tubes are a bit better. If we don't use the tubes right away, we inflate them with a couple pounds and store them in a dark basement, or they will rot at the folds. Was there some kind of change in the composition of the materials used to make them, like something no longer available? Tires seem to wear rapidly also. Soft rubber compounds? All this being said, we really appreciate being able to purchase tires for our old cars. We owe a lot to the late Mr. Coker and a few others who saved and created the equipment to make them.
Fordially, Erik


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 09:53 pm:

I second Derek's suggestion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 10:43 pm:

Seems to me that some competition in the tire and tube supply chain would be a good thing. Forty years ago, we could get excellent tires and tubes. Wards Riverside tires wore like iron and were relatively cheap when there were lots of alternatives. Sears Allstate tires also were great, as were Denmans and many others. Now we have one manufacturer, and their product is far inferior to what was available 40 years ago. After 40 years of advancement in technology, we should have better products available to us, not inferior ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert - Granby ,CT on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

26-7 Drum taillights because you can't even find parts for them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 11:09 pm:

Nobody mentioned radiator shells yet so I don't feel so bad anymore. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 11:29 pm:

Ken, I'll add to that as I don't know where to find a nickel shell for my 26.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, January 30, 2015 - 11:33 pm:

I know it takes a lot of money, and certainly a lot of courage to tool up such a product, but my pick would be demountable rims that were actually affordable. How often do we see posts on here of tires slashed by sharp rims? At between $225.00 and 250.00 each, most of us end up trying to delay the inevitable by filing down the sharp edges and hoping for the best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 12:57 am:

Authentic reproductions of running-board toolboxes in various sizes, with optional clamp-mounting hardware for those who prefer not to drill holes.

Original-type Rocky Mountain Brakes (because the original design works just as well backward as forward).

Authentic reproduction speedometers.

Reproduction Marquette tire tools and Sioux tire tools.

A HIGH-QUALITY rear hub puller.

Thick-wall inner-tubes that don't need flaps and have authentic looking, metal valves that are properly fused to the rubber so as not to leak.

Electric light bulb adapters for pre-1915 oil lamps.

Authentic reproduction hand-Klaxon horns.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:31 am:

Bob, you don't have to drill holes to mount a running board toolbox. I don't like to do that so I mount a wooden base to the running board using the existing bolt holes. Then the toolbox can be screwed to the mounting board. There is another benefit to this method. By varying the width of the mounting board, odd sized boxes, perhaps a little wider than the running board, can easily be mounted without looking out of place.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza, north adams ma on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:36 am:

Hydraulically activated outside band breaks. The discs are functional but obvious. This way adjustment would be easier and linkage also eliminated. Also please make the cool all brass accessory stop/tail light again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 08:58 am:

Linkage for accessory band brakes so installers don't have to reinvent it every time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 08:59 am:

A higher quality key sw and panel for 26, and a better quality foot start sw. Also a more reasonably priced large amp meter I have had the best service out of original parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:28 am:

In addition to all of the above, the small amp meter for the 26/27. The ones out there a cheap, so cheap they are just for show as their accuracy is non existent. But I guess the cost of an accurate meter would prevent it being sold, but I'd purchase one. You can't beat the accuracy of Fun Projects large meter, but with the cheap 26/27 out there I guess it won't be practical to market an accurate one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:35 am:

Wicks that actually fit the oil lamps. Head gaskets that are indestructible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:59 am:

Anything that can be made in the USA!!!!!!!!!Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 10:27 am:

Allan Bennett,

I used to keep all my tools, sunglasses, oil-quarts and stuff in the storage compartment beneath the rear seat of my Flivver, but the very frequent need to get to those items made that location a little inconvenient, which was why I started searching for a running-board toolbox. - It turned out they're hard to come by—at least in good condition; rusted-out boxes are in abundance on e-bay. -I found tall ones and long ones that took up too much space on the running-board to allow my octogenarian Dad foot-room enough to climb into the car, but finally found a "battery-box" sized toolbox which, as it turned out, was more than sufficiently capacious to hold all the tools and stuff I need to keep readily at hand. -

After some soul-searching, I decided to drill the running-board to accommodate the small box, knowing that the same, closely-spaced holes could also be used to mount larger boxes should that ever become necessary. -I cut a rubber gasket out of a mat and put it in between the toolbox and the running-board to protect the paint.



I purchased my "battery-box" from e-bay for $200 in rough, "as-is" condition, meaning it was missing the key for the locking latch and needed to have its chipped and faded paint sandblasted off, the dents pounded out, then some bondo, sanding, primer and paint. -I thought the price was steep considering condition, but then again, battery box-sized toolboxes are rare as hens' teeth. -As luck would have it, just a few months later, at Hershey, I came across an identical box in mint condition, with a beautiful, brass, locking latch and a pair of keys. -The price tag was marked for $350, which I'd have gladly paid, had I not already bought and repaired the other one. -

This little box was a very popular accessory for just about all Brass-Era automobiles, not just Model T Fords, and I'm surprised that no sheet-metal outfit has taken advantage of the wide open market for what would undoubtedly be an easy-to-manufacture, hot-selling item.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By harvey cash on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:12 am:

Definitely, Tall radiator shells. Harv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:19 am:

I'll second Bill Robinson's suggestion:

"How about seat rests/cones for Tudor seats?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:20 am:

John Noonan -- Rims are available at a reasonable price. And I'm pretty sure they are made in the USA.

http://www.americanvintagerims.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:44 am:

An exhaust pipe built to original factory drawings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

I often wonder why reproduction parts can not be made to be right. I can not understand going through all the effort and financial investment to make something that is not right. I encounter this alot with musclecar parts. I would prefer things were made in USA, but quite frankly at this point, I don't care where it is made as long as it at least fits as it should.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronald L Babb on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 01:37 pm:

I am new at this, just have my first, a 1923 coupe but I have yet to find vintage looking, well made outside hinge mount mirrors. I find many for the roadsters and touring cars but none for closed cars. This in minor part but appears a neglected item.

Ron in Tacoma


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Spainhower - Portland, Oregon on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 02:02 pm:

A '15 and later quadrant, with a choice of brass plated for the '15, or powder-coated black for the rest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 02:38 pm:

Good New Day Timer body and brush assembly.
A good turn-key alternator set for non generator cars. Pre- 1919.
Inner Tubes as mentioned above.
A better speedster body.
USA made parts that fit is a giant plus.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 02:55 pm:

Chad the muscle cars reproductions in the 60's-70's are china made junk. These guys who sell them don't have a clue what is correct or not. Its all about sales (money). Also these people who work there are hire off the streets, they don't know anything about their products, how it fits & so on....Its a different breed of car people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 03:40 pm:

I second the New Day timer.
With technology improved the way it is I cant see why the New Day case cant be reproduced to at least the same material as the original was.

That one item would probably outsell some of the accessories that are being currently made for a T.

I scratch my head wondering why the effort is being made for some accessories. I guess to each his own.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 04:20 pm:

I bought two 21" split rims from a guy in Colorado a couple of years back on Ebay for a reasonable price. The pictures that he posted looked nice. When I got them, I couldn't believe my eyes. They were either new repos or NOS. They didn't have a scratch or rust pit anywhere, no wear in the rim lug nut holes, and straight as an arrow. Paid one third the price of new repos..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 04:37 pm:

As far as the small ammeter is concerned, Model A's used them as well as 26-27 T's, so I would think there would be enough of a market.

On the 26-27 drum stoplights, I don't think a vendor could recoup his investment unless every 26-27 owner bought one for his 26-27 car/cars. If a foreign manufacturer could be found to make them cheap enough, the two lenses might be worth it. The nickel plated rim should be easy enough to stamp out of brass, with the steel main bucket with Ford script, being the hardest part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Hansen on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 04:56 pm:

I seldom post, when I saw the comments on tires thought I should mention an interesting conversation I had about a month past. The lady I've been seeing for considerable amount of time brother in law who I have met and talked to several times had big nuts in the Perrilli Tire Company from which he retired his last employment, making big bucks.

I told him the tires now available for the T's especially the 30 inch really are a poor product. Seemed all I could get was 5 or 6 thousand out of a tire and we are limited to one supplier. We didn't go into a lot of detail only a brief conversation. He basically said as far as the major manufactures are concerned they are selling to the single source their junk rubber, shipping to Nam or wherever. Told him they own all or most of the molds He said have to see the product, but should be able to make a mold for an reasonable number from what I described to him and they are good to go for a long time

When he mentioned junk rubber he used various names for the different types and why they were considered scrap as a results of manufacturing. Like any manufacturing industry there is unusable residue and they source it out to whomever is willing to buy

About two weeks ago, think he was bored, he was hired on by a Chinaman Company for big bucks to design a tire for the USA market they hope to penetrate. Before I met this lady I'm seeing she told me, confirmed by the family, he received big bucks from and going to China for consulting.

Will have to talk to him in more detail next time I see him. I feel knowing his past history, living in Europe, involved in the 500 Indy tires etc he knows the business


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:14 pm:

Jim N.,

30 X 3-1/2" rims are $135.00 each, made in USA.

The rims I just bought for my Dayton wire wheel project were $600 each and not yet drilled for spokes.

Conclusion: Model T rims are very reasonable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:19 pm:

I'll say it again. No tire company, who wants to remain in business long enough to recover their start-up costs, will make a tire that lasts over 5000 miles for cars that are driven, on average, 1000 miles per year.

Modern tires will last 5 - 6 years on modern cars.
Antique car tires will last 5 - 6 years on antique cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 06:28 pm:

Gerald -- Please follow up on that. As I said above, that market badly needs some competition. It would benefit all of us.

And from your profile: "If it is to be--It is up to me" :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard Tomlinson on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 06:54 pm:

How about spring bolts with the correct heads and lengths?

I bought a rear spring bolt from a vendor that the head was wrong (sort of expected that) and was too short.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 07:05 pm:

Fan belts that don't delaminate after a short time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 07:33 pm:

I have never had a Gates fan belt give any trouble?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 08:41 pm:

I know, I'm talking about the correct looking ones. I'm running some kind of custom made belt. I don't like it but, it seems to work so far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 01:03 am:


I was going to say coil box switch bases, because the original rubber ones are usually pretty bad. But looking in Lang's catalogue, I see you can them new in Bakelite for $87.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 09:50 am:

24-25 Closed car window risers would be nice to have reproduced.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronald L Babb on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 09:59 am:

I second the closed car window risers. I am looking for 2 for my '24 coupe and know of others also searching.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Kile ....San Jose CA on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Guys, the 1924 style closed car window riser gear cases ARE being reproduced. I bought 4 of them for my '24 Tudor and they work perfectly. Looks like that are CNC machined and you need to use your original gears and shafts. The new gear cases replace the old pot-metal cases. I have permission from the gentleman making them to give out his email and phone number so email me off the forum and I will get his info to you. I am in no way connected other than a very satisfied customer. Bruce Kile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 02:01 pm:

To save on cost of shipping back and forth, kit to install new windings on your mag coil ring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 03:03 pm:

Bruce that window riser is one style that is being reproduced. Some cars used one of the other styles that Ford used.
My car used the universal style that was available. It could be used for either door. I was thinking Ford used three different styles.

The ones in my car does not have any pot metal or gears in it and are well made. That's probably why with a little lubrication they will last a very long time.

It could be the style that used the pot metal gear cases would work in the Coupe but there may some modifications have to be made in the wood framing if it was not like the style like you have. If they will work that would be great. It would be nice if they were advertised.

One more question: is it the complete riser assembly or is it just the pot metal gearing parts.

I do remember the pot metal parts for the risers being reproduced but that was a good while back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 03:25 pm:

I don't believe 09-11 timers are made anymore. The late Howard Caccia made them as well as timers for NRSs. I was fortunate to have purchased a few but they don't last forever. I wonder what ever happened to Howard's jigs and patterns. It would be a neat sideline for someone. The timers sold for about $200 apiece but I bet those who own early cars would pay more for a quality piece. I would.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 02:19 pm:

4-36 x 3/16 brass machine screws to hold the wires in headlight plugs. Losing a 25˘ screw shouldn't require spending nine or ten bucks for another plug. I just spent $1.41 each for a half dozen with shipping. If the Model T parts dealers stocked these you could include them in an order for other parts and not pay several times the price of the item for shipping.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

Tires!!! Prices!!!!
Tubes that hold up and air!
Rims made in China ($$$) and have a rejection inspection THERE prior to a shipment. Like Grizzly does.
These items are not priced like the ones we use to get from Brazil in the 70's. Those were usually of good quality and worked as drivers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 11:51 pm:

How about clutch shafts? Nobody makes them but they seem like they would be as easy as a pedal shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 12:42 am:

After about 1916 or 1917(ball park guess) the clutch shaft and lever are one piece, so no they would not be easy to make. The early ones had two key slots and relieved for the pinch bolts for the clutch through out bearing holders but the lever was riveted on. There could have been a time that the lever and clutch through out bearing holders were all riveted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 12:58 am:

That's definitely news to me.... Every one I've seen, not counting the early ones with the slots, had a forging riveted on where the linkage goes at the pedal end then it has 2 holes where the internal fork pieces are riveted. I know Bob Begstadt just had an early one listed on ebay, but the others I've seen are just drilled 5/8" shafts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 04:40 am:

Perhaps the most elusive and most abused part is the forged front spring/engine mount U bolt. Many have stripped threads. There isn't even a rough copy which will do the job, let alone one which looks the part.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 07:16 am:

How about consistently good trailer tires. Since production of most brands moved to China, their quality is notoriously inconsistent. Some trailer tires give years of service, but some brands seem to throw treads or blow out side walls for no apparent reason. Even seems like with the old reliable names are afflicted with these problems. I like to be able to trailer my T without worrying about random tire failures and blowouts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 10:01 am:

How about some authentic rear axle bearings for the rear end?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 10:58 am:

I have in the past tried to reproduce several of these hard to find items, however, it still takes a lot of up front time and material to get that first one made. I know it easy to say, "Lets get Mikey to do it" but that can be hard to find a person willing to do a start up especially on a short run project that only a few will ever sell.

Then if an item does have some footing the production will often be moved to off shore companies that can bet the cost of production here. My late pardoner and I did well reproducing some of the KRW tools but now that he's gone I have just the remains of the inventory and most of that will end.

krw

krw

krw

This one never made it past a half dozen prototypes since we saw it as it was going to be too over priced for the T group.

krw
Many that we did were just T parts not being reproduced at the time.

krw


krw

Bruce may have been referring to me on the remake of the gear boxes for the closed sedan window risers. I also have a few of the correct window cranks that I nickel plated and also made the center screws that hold them in place and have some of the escutcheon plates. But when these are gone they're gone at least by me. At 72 I would like to pass these projects on to whomever wants to take them on but you shouldn't give up your day job. Bob

krw

krw


k


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Friday, February 13, 2015 - 11:38 am:

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Stakes for the TT Ford Truck flatbed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 05:16 pm:

There are some castings I would like to be available:

...1) For a two piece drive shaft (1909-1913): the casting for the front end of the tube with the 4 bolt ears. I believe the bell end is already available.
...2) 1912 Rear end castings (for the center pumpkin). I believe these would rivet to the axle tubes of the 1913-14 rear end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 09:47 pm:

Amen to Rick's suggestion, especially the front casting of the two piece driveshaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 09:55 pm:

I think it would be a good idea for someone to reproduce the accessory lower wishbone to add to cars with the above the axle through the perch wishbones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 10:47 pm:

This would be "involved", but a kit to get car speeds out of TT's. Lots of people
like the trucks, but stay away because they are so slow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 03:14 am:

Paul, there is a wishbone support available from Lang's: https://www.modeltford.com/item/2733S.aspx
(I would make one myself if I had an early car - easy enough with some scrap metal and a welder.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 04:59 am:

Rear truss rod sets! I've had a friend working on them for a while but he has never gotten them done! I have a nice center saddle and some outside collars that are for a different style (they will work) but it would be great to have a complete setup available.

The original style AC brake linkage; I don't like the modern design.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 11:10 am:

Part #3272, mag ring spacer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 01:18 pm:

Bill Harper,I concur,but they should be in 0.005,010,015,and 020 thickness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 01:53 pm:

I know this, it's awfully time consuming and expensive to reproduce ANY parts at all. Thank you to everyone who does. I don't think anyone reproducing any Model T parts is getting rich doing it. There might be a handful who break even or do slightly better than breaking even.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 02:48 pm:

I have a 16 & 24 Carrier Wire Harness Braiding Machine, with the carriers. Great for the hobbyist or start your own harness business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 07:02 pm:

I think I see new front perches for some years but I don't think I have seen where you can get rear perches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 07:17 pm:

Stevens front axle repair tools. There are a lot of T axles with shot threads and wallowed out upper king pin holes that could be repaired if these tools were available.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 11:50 pm:

More Kingston L, L2, L4 and G parts like throttle shafts/levers. It would be good also to make over sized shafts like they do for Model A Zenith carbs. If someone is rebuilding the carbs someone must be making the parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 11:57 pm:

I think Mark's idea is great! I'd love to be able to get those parts and play with a few of my extra carbs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 11:42 am:

In the past I have reproduced some of the early carb parts for rebuilders but to do one offs or short runs just doesn't work, at least for with the requirement for the set up time to make a couple pieces. I know it seems it shouldn't take a lot to make up a simple part until you have do it from scratch. In many cases special taps are required that have to be purchased often costing more then selling price of the item being make so I have get a dozen ordered to just get a start to break even.


carb parts

Elbows for the 5 ball carb
carb parts

These carb adjustment knobs may look the same on their tops but if you want the correct one for your carb you have know which one is for yours. Some have a 1/4"-32 thread that holds the needle others have a reamed 1/4" hole and are pinned. Then the 14 have an under cut rather a straight cut on the bottom side.
carb parts

When you look at the side view there are 5 different knurls used so again just need to know the one yours had. So you can see making up a batch of adjustment knobs can be tricky in making up enough for the each model. Bob

carb parts

Float arms
carb parts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 08:31 pm:

The problem with creating a new, or reproducing an old, product for the T market is the enormous cost involved in production. The market, it appears, is so small there's no way to make back your initial investment, let alone to make a profit. If you want to make money, the T market isn't it. I wish it was, but there's enough quality parts suppliers to keep the hobby running smoothly. I hope someone can prove me wrong.


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