Old Photo on Shorpy- A lone T.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo on Shorpy- A lone T.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 04:17 am:

Opening of a Goodyear depot, 1932. Several A's many OTF (Other Than Ford) models, and a lone Model T.

Some interesting other vehicles and depot fittings to be seen.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/19142


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 04:36 am:

There's a roadster pickup by the streetcar. Isn't that a T, too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:31 am:

Looks like it is two Ts!
Did you notice the "tire-tread-mobile"?
Something else I noticed. I think I saw at least six cars with tire covers on their spare tires. I always thought they were more unusual than that back in the day. At least three of them had the car's name or some other advertising on the cover. That was what first caught my attention.
Thanks Dane H!

GFtE, What are you doing up and on the forum at this hour? I thought I was bad.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 05:57 am:

Preparing for my afternoon nap!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 06:07 am:

BTW, the '30 roadster near the Goodyear blimp seems already to have been converted to '32 wheels - they look too fat for a 19-inch wheel. And behind the big touring car with side curtains there seems to be a '29 cabriolet, not a sport coupe - I don't see a sun visor. That would be a nice car to have, but I'd want side mounts on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Trenton, New Jersey on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 07:38 am:

Is that a luggage rack on the front of of the trolley car? Very nice photo, No air operated tire changing machine there I'll bet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:27 am:

Dane,

Thanks for pointing it out. I wish the Goodyear store had opened a few years earlier so there would have been more Model Ts -- but still a neat glimpse into the past. The caption has Sept. 14, 1932. "Goodyear service station opening, Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco." Below is a thumbnail look – so if someone reviews this a few years from now and the photo is no longer available at Shorpy at: http://www.shorpy.com/node/19142 they can see what we were talking about.



Will -- my guess (and it is a GUESS) on the item in front of the trolley car is a "people / dog etc. guard" to keep folks from going under the car if they are hit. But that is just a guess. Below is a close up of that area – notice the pedestrian walking between the cars – if he stepped or stumbled in front of the street car that could prevent major injury or death.



The 1926 -27 style coupe is shown below. It maybe just the angle of the photo but the front wheels look more like 30 x 3 1/2 than 21 inch balloon tires to me. For sure it came from the factory with matching wheels and according to the Wheels & tires note at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1926.htm the closed cars came standard with the 21 inch demountable balloon tires. But the note at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/U-Z.htm#wheels for 1926 does not state “all the closed cars had 21 inch demountables.” And the MTFCI Judging Guidelines 6th Edition [available at: http://modelt.org/featured/product/judging-guidelines/ ] does not mention that the 1926 enclosed cars were all 21 inch or not. Perhaps if Russ Furstnow reads this he may have a clarification to offer on when “if” 1926 closed cars ever had 30 x 3 1/2 demountables? Or if someone else has some addition data they could share that would be great. And of course the Ford dealer would put whatever size wheel and tires you wanted on the car as long as the dealer was making a profit. But still they would be the same size all the way around the car.




Note the Model T pickup appears to have a taller and wider than normal bed. I wish it had been closer to the center of the photo so we could see the details better. I think it either has a swapped out bed or perhaps it might even be a cut off touring? But I cannot tell from what I have looked at so far.



Gilbert – I agree the wheels on the 1930-31 Model A Coupe (I think that is the car you are discussing) are not the standard Ford issued 19 inch wheels.



From the photo I would guess they are accessory wheels – but I can’t make that out for sure. But I think they look too big for the standard 1932 Ford wheels which from memory (not as good as it once was) and a search of the internet were 18 inch (not the best search results either). Below is a 1932 Ford three window photo from the Wall Street Journal article by Joseph B. White at: http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB122367066649923931 showing the 1932 Ford wheels. They look taller and more narrow to me than the wheels & tires in the Shorpy photo.



Note the Coupe appears to have a typical 1931 lower part on the radiator shell but the upper part looks more like 1930 than 1931. So I’m not sure what they did with the shell – or if the photo just makes it look that way.

From the traffic lines I suspect the gasoline may have also been on sale as part of the grand opening.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robbie Price on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 10:01 am:

I am pretty sure the bottoms of the 30 shells looked like the 31's? Which were painted?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:00 am:

Robbie,

Thank you for catching my mistake. You are correct – both the 1930 and 1931 Model A Fords had a painted section for the lower part of the radiator shell. And only the 1931s had the painted upper section. I hate getting older … of course when faced with the alternative … it is still the better choice. Sorry I didn’t check that one out first. The MTFCA does have a good “What year Model A Ford” page at: https://www.mafca.com/whatyear.html

So the coupe would be a 1930.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by hap_tucker on January 31, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, February 01, 2015 - 03:03 pm:

The '30 A five window coupe is a Deluxe Coupe, you can tell by the cowl lights.
Deluxe coupes, roadsters and cabriolets had cowl lights and rumble seat. The Deluxe roadster had a lower windshield too.
There were many aftermarket wheels for the model A including wood wheels and clincher wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:12 pm:

What's the giant horn on top of the truck in the "Electrical" bay?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:29 pm:

The contraption on the front of the streetcar is an "Eclipse Safety Fender". Many early Los Angeles Railway streetcars (narrow gage) used them.

It is, in fact, a people catcher.


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