Stewart Speedometer cable questions........

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Stewart Speedometer cable questions........
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 07:51 am:

First I wanted to know what should I lube the ends with? Also are the grooves that undercut the shank, for lube or is there something that I am missing........check the photo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 08:58 am:

Last one I did,I greased entire cable links with Vasoline,hooked it to a wire I had put down through the outer housing and pulled it in.If any gets on you or clothes it washes out.Mine has been working for many years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russ Furstnow on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:31 am:

Robert,
I use wheel bearing grease specifically designed for boats. Stewart Warner cables use this type of inner cable arrangement. The cable end in the photo with the slide is called the "lower clutch of chain" and is designed to attach at the swivel end of the cable. The slide should be lubricated. The other end, called the "upper clutch of chain" should always be attached to the speedometer head end of the cable. Also, note the chain link you have photographed has a wider opening at one end to allow for the attachment of the upper or lower clutch of chain.

While I know there are many people who do not like to use these chain links, I have found them to be very reliable and easy to install. Stewart Warner used them for over twenty years, and if a link ever does break, it is very easy to install another one and continue on with your drive.
I hope this helps,
Russ Furstnow


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:34 am:

Jacks right. Get a tube of Vaseline with a spout and keep squirting it in as you pull the links in. Not as messy as greasing the whole thing before installing. YOu cannot have too much grease in there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:39 am:

I have always used regular chassis gun grease. It is like Vaseline, but made for lubrication. I agree with Russ 100%. I have original Stewart links in all three of my T's, and have never had a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 09:45 am:

Robert,

I suggest you clean out the old grease in the Stewart cable housing after you remove the cable links. I usually pull a string through the housing when I pull the links out. That way I can pull the clean greased links back through.

Russ Furstnow has an excellent book on the speedometers which I recommend.

Clean and hook all the links and the long end (top in your photo) and grease them.

Russ recommended that I use the same bearing grease I use in the front wheel bearings. That has worked well for me for five years and many miles.

I just scoop some bearing grease in my hand and pull the assembled cable end and links through my well greased hand as they go back into the housing. Pull in with the string is how I do it.


The most important thing to do is "lay" the links in the cable before you hook the cable to the speedometer head. You will break a link if they are not laid correctly in the cable.

To do that, take the cable with the links and ends in place and attach the swivel end to the swivel. Jack up the right front wheel (I assume you have a Stewart No. 1913 rhd swivel) and rotate it in the direction it would go if you were driving down the street. Stop the wheel and connect the speedometer cable to the speedometer head. Let it down and you are good to go.

The links will be "pulling" each other as you drive forward. If you don't, there may not be enough wiggle room in the links to flip over and they will be "pushing" themselves in the housing and you will break a link down the road eventually.

That is how I do my cables and I have yet to break a link. The Vasoline may do the trick also. I just use wheel bearing grease.

The little grooves on the ends are on mine too. I don't think you are missing anything if you have enough links. Of course, the housing should not have any kinks or breaks in it that would bind the links.

Russ, Larry and Dave are much quicker than this old man <grin> and posted while I was two finger typing!

Ken in Texas

(Message edited by drkbp on January 31, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:28 am:

Thanks for the response, and the wealth of information........I will go forward now........Bob


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