Old Photo - Over A Dozen New Brass Era Model Ts Parked In Front Of A Dealership

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Over A Dozen New Brass Era Model Ts Parked In Front Of A Dealership
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, February 01, 2015 - 11:31 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:38 am:

I count 16 New 1914 Touring cars and at least 11 horses making deliveries.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 01:41 pm:

That is an interesting photo. The first and fourth car have electric light reflectors in their headlights. There some more down the line but the gas light cars will appear to have a dark headlight bucket from that angle. The mirrors can't be seen.

Some of the late 1914 open cars were being built into the 1915 model year. I wonder if some of them would have come with magneto powered headlights like the 1915's?

Ken in Texas

(Message edited by drkbp on February 02, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 02:28 pm:

No 6 and 9 look to have electric reflectors also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 03:46 pm:

Here's the same photo on a Maine historical site:

http://www.mainememory.net/artifact/16345

The site says the dealer took delivery of partly assembled vehicles during the winter and assembled them for sale in the spring when the roads were better. Where Fords delivered partially assembled at the time frame pictured?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 03:56 pm:

On the Maine site you can read the picture very clearly with the zoom. The sign to the left says "Holt & Hight - Potatoes, HAY, Straw & Hemlock Bark" and the sign to the right reads " Home of the Famous Ford Motor Cars"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

Those objects with the pointy ears behind the cars, aren't they trade ins?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

Brian,

Thank you for posting the link to the higher resolution copy. And I suspect the original even higher resolution might add some additional details.

First -- I agree there are 16 Model T Fords lined up. But the higher resolution copy gives us a better look at them. The last one is shown below:



Note the windshield braces and two piece dash indicate it is a 1912 or earlier car. And I think the front spindle and axle are the one piece and not the two piece which would make it even earlier. But that is not totally clear in the photo.

Below is the first car at the higher resolution:



And while I cannot make out if the doors go all the way down to the sill like the 1913 or if they are rounded 1914 style. But below I have zoomed in and worked with the color a little bit.



You will notice the original photographer added some red circles, red arrows and a yellow text box ... ok -- not really. But I do believe we can see on that car the unique 1913 door handles that stick up above the doors.

So what do we have? A photograph that probably is NOT a line up of all new 1914 tourings. But it could be the cars that had been sold by that dealer that were available for a photograph. That would also offer a logical reason for the electrified gas headlamps.

And concerning shipping of the cars in a knocked down condition. Originally they were shipped where all the folks had to do was add oil, water, gas and check the tires and you could drive it out of the box car. Sometime they transitions to shipping the chassis in one end of the box car and the bodies in the other end. From memory I don't recall when that was being done. I know they were shipped knocked down by by 1915 as there are photos of them being loaded in the box cars. I personally believe they were still being shipped fully assembled for the very early 1913s that still had striping. See the second photo at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/213589.html?1308411199 that Dan Knoll Jr posted and the comments about that photo.

Note by 1914 the cars were coming out of the box car with the fenders removed etc. See: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/84724.html I suspect the body was placed back on them prior to most of them being taken out of the box car to make it easier to move the bodies. The first one or two would have to come out unassembled because there would not have been room to mount the body on the first one (and possibly first two).

And below is from one of the Ford documents showing the 1915s being loaded. They are knocked down.



If anyone has additional data on when Ford began shipping the knocked down cars in the USA, please let us know.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 11:04 pm:

Hap,

The windshield and bracket on that first one is the 1913 style too when you blow it up. You have a good theory because the first one has that lower windshield panel raked back more than the next several cars. Typical of the 1913's. Most of the rest are more upright and typical of the 1914's except for the one earlier car.

Ken in Texas


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration