Old Photo - Brass Era Posing At The Shingle Factory

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Brass Era Posing At The Shingle Factory
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 11:04 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 11:14 am:

- - - and not enjoying it one little bit!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 11:16 am:

That would be a very nice picture to show the paint experts when they say they were all dull and sloppy from new!!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Trenton, New Jersey on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

They all look as if they are mad at the world. Iv said it before, 80% of the photo's back then the folks just don't seem to smile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

The teenage girl just seems bored. The others do look down right mad.

I don't know that anyone thinks the paint was dull from the beginning, just that it didn't stay shiny for very long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

Dull paint is one of the myths you often see from journalists and others but rarely on the forum. Sloppy isn't a myth, you could find runs on all new Fords that were painted with the dipping/flowing on method


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 01:08 pm:

The car appears to have the very early short "billed" front fenders. Each fender is backed up by a light surface and seem to exhibit that feature on the front edge.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 03:10 pm:

Roger,I think it matters when they were built as to the flow method? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 03:36 pm:

Nice picture, thanks for sharing. It's good shot for period clothing.

I think they are all mad because they bought the car but haven't sold enough shingles to buy any gasoline so they just take turns sitting behind the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, February 02, 2015 - 03:44 pm:

Must have been my dad taking the picture. Even in the 1950's he had everyone stand and then took what seemed to be 10 minutes fiddling with the camera before he took the picture! That would make anyone bored or angry!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 08:18 am:

Ken,

You are correct that the front fenders do not have a bill. Which is typical 1913 to early 1914 (ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1914.htm see fenders).

While I could not make out the shape of the doors, I did zoom in on the photo and you can see the rear door handle sticking up above the rear door. [For Window users hold down the Ctrl key and roll the mouse button for larger or back to make it smaller.] Those style door locks are typical of the 1913 with the doors going all the way to the wood sill. There were also some accessory door handle extensions sold but most of those I have seen have a rounded ball end at the top and are curved in the handle. These do not appear to be those.

Jay and others -- as always thank you so much for posting the early photos. There is so much more to learn and document (or re-document).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 08:30 am:

Is that not a '14 since the top window folds forward?
Definitely looks like the "pickle-puss" family!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 08:51 am:

I agree with shiny when new, faded later, and sloppy. My original paint 1922 touring still had a decent shine and would still polish up fairly well, but only on parts like the hood, fenders, running boards, splash aprons, radiator shell, and windshield. Those were parts that could be "baked". The main body and doors were very dull, with no remaining shine at all. Then the "runs" were massive as well as "puddles" in the corners. So my car at lest was a "sloppy" version. ..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 10:36 am:

Tim -- I believe the windshield on 13's folded forward and backward on the 14's. Also, the hinge brace was straight on 13's and had some bends in it for '14 to clear the folded windshield.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 10:40 am:

For comparison, a '14 is pictured in this thread:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/515428.html?1422971283#POST703711


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

Mike, yep you're right. Dang, I think I'm dislexic! I really did know it's the opposite. Cold weather's got me befuddled! Doesn't take much to confuse me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 03:58 pm:

Great photo showing a correct top boot, and the front fenders do have the typical '13 angled out bill in the front.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 04:31 pm:

From the looks on their faces, one would think that their ice cream had melted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Obviously the phrase "Everybody say Cheese!" had not yet been invented!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

I think they were using the short lived earlier version "everybody look like you smell cheese".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 06:03 pm:

Maybe they're all frowning because they have shingles? Should have gotten their shots.

I know. Bad, bad, bad.
Feel free to shun me for awhile.

Great photo, however.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 10:03 am:

This is one of the finest photos of a new '13 I've seen, and it has the not so common top boot on it as well, not to mention the '13 style lipped front fenders. Is anyone capable of zeroing in on those valve stems? I'd like to know if the felloe nuts are round or hex!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 10:08 am:

Is it just me, or is the headlight glass missing, or really clean?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, February 07, 2015 - 01:39 pm:

Larry,

I tried zooming in on the valve stems on the front left and left rear wheel But I could not really see if they were the round or hex style nut holding the stem to the felloe. But, I also could NOT make out the Ford script on the hub caps which indicates to me either the photo was a low resolution photo, the lighting was such that the features are not shown, or the scan is such a low resolution that I cannot make it out. Disclaimer, I am only using the Microsoft Picture Manager that came with my older computer and an old small flat screen that is not a high resolution, and I wear glasses. Someone with a higher resolution screen or better photo program etc. might be able to make out the features on the current photo.

I've posted the photo below several times but I believe it helps illustrate the difference a higher resolution scan and posting can make. And I am using the same older small screen and older computer to view them that I tried to see what type of nut held the valve stems to the felloes on the photo above. I used to have this photo in my wallet. It is approximately 3 x 2 1/2 inch photograph of my Dad, Mom, Sister, and my Grandparents all sitting our 1918 Model T Touring (yes, we still have that T). It kept getting in worse and worse shape, so I pulled it out of my wallet and placed it in a drawer. Below is a low resolution scan that looks fine on the computer screen. You can see the many cracks in the photo from being carried for many years in my billfold.



Below is the license tag zoomed in on the same low resolution scan:



Below is the license tag zoomed in on a high resolution scan from the same poor quality photograph but scanned at a much higher level (300 dpi or perhaps it was 600 dpi (dots per inch) – sorry I don’t remember).



Notice that on the higher resolution photo we can read the year of the license tag as "50" for 1950 on the Texas tag. The higher resolution scan and/or posting can make a big difference unless the original photo area is out of focus or in the shadows etc.

I would say there is a reasonable chance if we could obtain a higher resolution copy of the photograph we would be able to make out the type of nut on the valve stem. Does anyone know where we might locate a higher resolution copy?

If there is anyone else out there wondering what Larry meant when he said, “…the '13 style lipped front fenders.” And also what Ken meant when he said, “The car appears to have the very early short "billed" front fenders. Each fender is backed up by a light surface and seem to exhibit that feature on the front edge.” Below is a photo comparison cropped from page 35 of the Jan-Feb 1985 issue of the “Vintage Ford” and is used by permission to support our club and our hobby. Note the same un-cropped photos are on page 159 of Bruce McCalley’s (R.I.P.) book “Model T Ford” available in paper back from the vendors and from our club page at: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/model-t-ford-the-car-that-changed-the-world . It is also available on CD see: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/333725.html?1357665853



Ed – I believe you are correct that it is difficult to see the headlamp glass. But remember they are clear class and not a lens/fluted. Also on a non-MAC computer using windows, if you hold down the “ctrl” key and roll your mouse button forward you will zoom in on the photo. If you do that on the headlamps, I believe you can see reflections in the glass. And I don’t think the lights would work properly without the glass to keep the wind from blowing directly on the gas burner. But I’ll let one of the folks with actual experience using the gas lamps let us know if they could still be driven at night without any glass in the front door of the lamps.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Sunday, February 08, 2015 - 12:28 am:

Hap Ed,

I drove my '14 with John Brown 16 gas lights tonight. You have to have the glass in them or you will blow that flame all around. It was real windy last Sunday and it makes them harder to light without the door glass to block the wind.

I don't blow them out like the side and tail lights so I don't know how fast you would have to go. You turn off the gas and they slowly go out in about 15 seconds. I run a Prest-O-Lite B tank. Royce can tell you about the carbide generator.

The "reflection" in the headlight door is the inside of the headlight bucket and not a reflection. He has his glass clean. The only glass reflection I see is in the top windshield panel where you can see the right side light.

Another interesting feature is the early tail light location I noticed a few days ago. It is trailing almost directly behind the left rear fender inside skirt.

The tail light is not one of the square lights either. By the looks of the stack it seems to have the rare Victor tail lamp Bruce shows on page 167 of his book. It is the only "round" kerosene lamp on the '13-'14's and not seen often. It is not a very good angle but it could be that lamp.

Yes, this is a very good photo of what looks to be a new car and fun to look at. Thank you Jay.

Ken in Texas


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration