Little help

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Little help
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 10:52 am:

I just got my short block back from the engine shop. I guess I failed to remove everything when I sent it in so I have to install some things that I did not remove. There is an oil line and cup that seems to run from the flywheel area to the front of the engine. Is the cup soldered on or just pressed together? Does the bolt that holds the cup hold anything else? Does this line just dump oil to the front of the engine? Does the front of the line attach to anything or just hang there? Should there be anything around the line as it passes through the engine block? Next, as I put the engine together should I use gasket sealer in the places where the gaskets butt together? I don't like using rtv but what do you think? Thanks for your help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 10:58 am:

cup needs to be soldered, and bolts on with one of the magneto coil mounting bolts. the tube runs thru holes in the block just above the cam and in to the front timing gears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 11:11 am:

The cup or funnel is soldered on the oil line. The funnel got much bigger in 1924, you may want one of the later type to make sure enough oil flows forward.

The bolt holding the oil line is one of the bolts holding the magneto coil ring. The front part of the oil line doesn't have any special fasteners, it's held in place by the holes in the block it goes through.

Gasket sealer is needed for some areas like the front part of the hogshead. I cut the felt I got in the gasket package to half its thickness, soaked it in some Permatex form-a-gasket, and added some rtv in the corners and on the sealing surfaces of the hogshead, nothing excessive. Worked for me, but there are other methods :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Conklin on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 11:18 am:

I'm guessing that the engine is missing the the coil plate, if so I think it would be a good idea to install a spacer between the block and oil line mounting tab so as to properly locate the oil line assembly.
Also the connection of the funnel to the tube needs to be substantial.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 11:30 am:

If you don't use magnets and coils, you may want some type of paddles on the flywheel to ensure proper oil delivery to the front of the engine - and enough splashed oil fog for the transmission. The outer/lower screw holes for the coil ring goes through the engine block, so you have to put screws there to prevent oil leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 11:42 am:

Sorry guys I forgot to mention it is a 1926 with the mag removed. Very good info. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 01:16 pm:

Scott,

If you're going to keep the coil ring out, be sure to seal up the two magneto mounting bolt holes that sit just above the pan rails. They're usually drilled through to the outside by just a little bit and will pour oil out if the holes aren't sealed off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 04:02 pm:

I didn't see any other guys recommending you use a Permatex product called ULTRA Black but if you don't want leaks it's the best that man guys here have found! It's not the same as the plain old RTV.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 04:17 pm:

Scott, I would bronze weld the funnel to the pipe rather than rely on sodder.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

I second Gene's recommendation for the Ultra Black. It comes in a squeeze tube like toothpaste or a can with a handle on it. The can with the handle is wonderful, enabling you to apply a very small bead of the stuff so it goes a long way. Don't give in to the temptation to buy the tube because it's cheaper; the small bead from the can will go a lot farther. One can will do more than one engine and transmission. I use it all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Tuesday, February 03, 2015 - 07:20 pm:

I normally put gaskets on dry. Should I put that stuff on one side of gasket or both sides of the gasket or just at the joint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 09:12 am:

I put it on both sides of the gaskets if it's something that won't be taken apart any time soon. For things like the transmission cover, which will need to be removed to adjust bands from time to time, I use sealer on one side and heavy grease on the other so it's easy to remove. "A little dab will do ya'." :-)

BTW, I don't know whether the way I do it is necessarily correct; it's just the way I do it. (For copper head gaskets, use Copper-Kote on both sides.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 09:45 am:

suggest installing an outside oil line. Having only the 1/4" inside oil line and splash is not sufficient for the way many of us drive our model T's today. I have a 1/2" outside oil line and am running with NO magnets or slingers. Fifteen years so far with no bearing adjustments/failures. Depending on the 1/4" internal oil line with magnets or slingers to drive sufficient oil up front is asking a lot! Most rod bearing failures occur up front.
Just my take on the subject...others may not agree!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 10:43 am:

Very good advise guys. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 11:15 am:

I think you need the Model T Shop Manual Reprint. The MTFCA engine and transmission manuals would come in handy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 11:21 am:

Les, Agree. The gent who rebuilt my engine has an extensive history working on Model Ts as did his father. He maintains adding slingers is unnecessary as the flywheel starter gear is running deeper in the oil than slingers do and it provides all the splash and oil mist necessary. Some have surmised that the slingers do little if any good as the oil level is lowered from the starter gear moving so much oil and the slingers may not even reach the lowered oil level.


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