Old Photo - Brass Era Roadside Pose

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Brass Era Roadside Pose
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 09:29 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 11:46 am:

'12 PA plate?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By william louis rosenthal on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 01:47 pm:

Interesting how the generator is located so far towards the rear of the car? Looks like an obstacle to using the left rear door.
Regards,
Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

Was it illegal for females to ride in the front seat? :>(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 11:46 pm:

There is a PA law stating all women must ride in the back seat to give the male driver directions and tell him how to drive the car.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 08:30 am:

Scott,

I suspect that the position of the holes for the acetylene tank on the 1912 running boards may have changed a couple of times or more. I agree that location for the gas generator would be really in the way if the rear doors were hinged at the rear. But for the smooth sided 1912 bodies the rear door was hinged at the front and opened from the rear of the car (both with the external rear door handle and the later ones without the external rear door handle). So the open door and acetylene generator would have both been in about the same location. Below is the photo Jay originally posted.





Above is a restored 1912 slightly earlier slab sided touring as it has the outside rear door handle. Photo is courtesy of the “Vintage Ford” Nov-Dec 1964 pg 28 used by permission to promote our club and hobby. (Same photo is on page 129 of Bruce McCalley’s (R.I.P.) book “Model T Ford.”) I do not know if the running board was original or not on the restored car. I do not know if the restorer put the gas generator back in the original position of if he moved it further aft so he could easily mount his spare accessory wheel. If anyone remembers that car and knows some of the history – I would love to know if it was or was not the original location. But either way, it shows that you could get in and out of the rear door with the gas generator located in that general position.

Note the generator appears to me to be in the same or very close to the same position “IF” you use the outside edge of the running board to judge the location of the gas generator on both cars.

Below is a photo of brand new 1912 cars being unloaded at the railway station (sorry for the grainy photo – but it does clearly show the location of the gas generator). Back then I believe they were still shipped fully assembled. Note the gas generator is in what many of us would consider a more logical location for a US produced Model T.



If anyone is near the Benson Ford Archives if they could please look at the record of change card for the running boards (part number 4813 and factory number 2531 of the left hand one that would have the gas generator holes in them and see if there is any mention of the holes for the gas generator being relocated. (And for completeness part number 4812 and factory number 2530 are for the right hand running boards ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/P-R.htm#rb .) If the card or the drawing does mention the holes being moved then that might or might not help us better date when the slab sided 1912s came into production. My current theory is “it looked good on paper to move the gas generator – but when used in production it became apparent the old location was better. Perhaps this was another of the “experiments” where it was tried for a while on limited production and then dropped? Or if there is no mention of them being moved then we would need to do additional research to figure out some other reason why what appears to be an original car in Jay's photo has the gas generator so far aft.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 09:13 am:

Hap,

Were the slash aprons punched on the left side for the gas line in the 1912 cars?

Ford punched the radiator with a 3/32" rim for the gas tubing in a January 1911 notation. Seems like they would have punched the left running boards and splash aprons at the same time.

My July 1913 left splash apron does have that 3/32" rimmed half inch hole in it (I can't really measure it because the gas hose is in it). Also, the running board has the generator holes "punched" as well. The hole doesn't really have a rim but it is pressed inward and definitely not drilled. Both running boards on the 1913's are the same, no left or rights.

The gas line on your photo of the car with wire wheels goes up under the body and that is most likely a "restoration" location.

Ken in Texas

(Message edited by drkbp on February 06, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 08:31 pm:

Females were not banned from the front seat but it took them 20 years to find that out. For some reason the men did not volunteer the information.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration