When are tires too old to use?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: When are tires too old to use?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

My TT came with a set of Lucas 6.00 - 20 rear tires on it that are virtually unused but terribly flat spotted from sitting for years without air. I found an unused set of 6.00 - 20 6 ply Good Year tires in perfect condition that have never been mounted but are extremely stiff. Will these tires expand out and make a reliable tire?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 09:52 pm:

6 ply tires going 15 mph will out last you i would think!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

6 ply's are going to be stiff right out of the factory brand new. Will they work? You'll have to try 'em and tell us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 10:20 pm:

If you dont want them,let me know what the cost is, I would!
The 1's on my TT came from a friends Peirce Arrow that were bought new in the 50's.Not perfect, got some cracks, but 15 mph? they will be fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 10:37 pm:

I mounted 4 new in their wrappings 3.5 x 30 inch Canadian Goodyear tires which haven't been made since the 50's on my touring back in 78. They're still on my car today, hell I'm beginning to think those tires will outlast me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

I have some old Wards Riverside tires (20 + yrs. old) on my model A roadster P/U that look like new. The car/tires spend most time inside. There is no side wall cracking. They look much better than tires that I bought for our 13 touring that are only a few years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 11:27 pm:

The NTSB suggests replacing tires after 10 years.

If they're Asian made, you'll be lucky to get 5 years. They haven't quite perfected turning bubble gum into rubber yet. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 07:14 am:

I suppose I'll give them a try. I like the look of them over the Lucas tires and they are also about an inch taller. Mack, the guy I got these from may have another set. I'll check next time I get down there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 08:09 am:

Ken when the NTSB says something like that, the manufacturers read it as job security and then cheapen the product. The NTSB should say, "Tires should be made in a way the tread will wear out before sidewall rot occurs".
From what the local tire guy told me about my Dean tires that only lasted 5 years before blowing out,he said they call it ozone cracking now.Made in US.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 09:54 am:

Down here they call it sun checking but my five year old Goodyears and the eight year old Michelin tires show no sign of it. The Chinese tires that were two years old checked and crazed after the first year. One tire blew-out just sitting in the driveway. It blew a patch of tread right out from under the tire and flipped it face up; one end still connected.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 10:11 am:

Question: When are tires too old to use?

Answer: When They are tired.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 10:35 am:

The thing with modern tires is that the compound is formulated for a certain traction factor, and wear component. As time progresses with exposure to the atmosphere and sunlight, the chemical composition of the rubber changes and these factors degrade. For example, motorcycle tires should not be used 5 years after the date of manufacture whether they have been in use or not. The demand on the rubber to perform is high and those two patches of rubber are all that is between you and a bad experience.

Now translating this to the T world, the demands are not high except in braking situation. Speeds are low. I would say so long as the it looks good and there is no evidence of a cord problem we are probably good to go. Weather cracking would be bad as that would allow the cords to be influence by the atmosphere and moisture and could lead to hidden damage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 12:06 pm:

The rear tires on my 1910 were put on in the mid 1950s. The fronts are Non Skid from the 1970s. The fronts have inner tubes from the 1970s. The rear inner tubes are from the 1950s. All hold air with little or no air leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 04:46 pm:

Good one Jay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 05:33 pm:

There are a few 4:50 x 21's that were made with Nylon casings and I think that makes a big difference. I don't know this for a fact, but I think a Nylon casing will deteriorate less (or slower) from weather checking than the more common casings. Just my opinion,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 05:56 pm:

Nylon casing makes all the difference in the world! Sidewall rubber checking can allow moisture to migrate inside the tire casing. Cotton cord will rot and can become very weak. Nylon cord does not rot due to moisture at all. It does break down in UV sunlight. So if the sidewalls check badly enough and begin falling off enough to expose the nylon to sunlight for a few years, they may become dangerously weak.
The rubber on the tread also can become hard enough to have poor traction and will wear fast. But theoretically, a 1950s nylon cord tire could be safe to drive on at moderate to lower speeds for more than a hundred years. For higher speeds, if the rubber gets hard enough? It can break down where it helps bind the nylon casing together allowing the casing to disintegrate.
On the other hand, I have told on this forum a few times about the 30X3.5 tire with a cotton cord casing that was only about twenty years old (some years ago). A beautiful tire. Very little checking. Almost new tread. But moisture had gotten to the tire and into the cord somehow. I tried to mount the tire for a T I was working on, and couldn't even mount it for a roller. It just ripped. I found out I could rip the sidewall with my bare hands.
My question is, how do I tell if the casing is nylon, cotton, or what? I would prefer to not trust a cotton cord tire. But many antique automobile tires do not say on them what the casing is made of.
Do drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 06, 2015 - 06:50 pm:

Wayne - The few used tires I have that I know to be Nylon are tires made by Insa. Someplace in S. America,....Chile I believe. Anyway, they are actually marked "NYLON" on the sidewalls, and again, this is only conjecture on my part, but back in the '50's and '60's, tire manufacturers made a pretty big deal out of nylon as it was a new thing developed during WW2, and I would not be surprised if other manufactures were proud enough of their nylon tires to mark them as such like Insa did. I know that my Dad put Sears Allstate tires on his '51 Pontiac more than once, and they were identified on the sidewalls with the word "NYLON". I also remember that they would take a temporary "set" after standing for awhile, especially in cold weather, and you could feel the flat spots for a mile or so until they "rounded out"! Dad didn't care tho' as he thought they were worth it for the extra quality. (....and I think he was right!) FWIW,......harold


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