Old Spark Plugs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Spark Plugs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Sunday, February 08, 2015 - 07:48 pm:

Albert Champion started importing spark plugs about 1905 or 06 and Henry was already using the 1/2" NPT for his standard size spark plug. So what plug was he using in the 1903 Model A? The first T's between 1908 and 12 used at least 4 manufacturers but Champion and AC didn't exist in 1903. Does any body have an answer or a reference?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, February 08, 2015 - 08:35 pm:

I am interested in this also. I have a 1908 Reliable Dayton High wheeler. The owners manual says to use only "Albert Champion" "sparking plugs" I have never been able to verify for sure what they are. The ones for my Reliable Dayton are also 1/2 in pipe thread. I have been told by a couple spark plug collectors, that they should be just like the early Model T " smooth" porcelain, with no ribs, Champion X plugs, but have nothing written on them at all. I have not been able to verify that with anything written ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Sunday, February 08, 2015 - 11:15 pm:

I think his first plug for the T was a Champion #7 but it may not have been on the plug. Perhaps just engraved or on the base. The #7 became the #31 and later that became the Champion X. The 31 number was reused later and perhaps the 7 also. The X came out much later. There is a good bit written by Rich Street at the Spark Plug Collectors of America website. One is Titled The First Twenty Year. If I re-find it I'll send you the link. Doug


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 07:30 am:

I did find that the Champion X was introduced in 1909 but wasn't marked as such until 1911. The early plugs were all marked with "CHAMPION" in caps. The early plugs were all take-apart. The A-25 and 25 came out later and were one piece.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 07:51 am:

I have not looked yet for the information, but interested in the Edison #13 history. I use them, they take a 1-1/8 wrench and have a double ground .......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 08:39 am:

Robert:

Been running with Edison #14's the past 5 years with no problems, haven't had any need to check or clean, engine starts, runs great ..... 1/2" pipe thread , single ground electrode. ... runs better than Champions in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 08:58 am:

I finally found a link to a very informative site on the history of early spark plugs.

http://www.rstreet.us/sparkplugs/

Lots of dates and infor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 09:16 am:

I think Rich Street may be a few years off in saying the brass hat Champion X was introduced around 1915-1916. From period ads I've seen, the older take-apart configuration was in use until about 1921. There was an intermediate version between straight-side and brass hat versions. It had a ribbed insulator but still used the 5-40 removable center rod of the earlier plugs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 09:35 am:

I have found a lot of wiggle room in these listings. It appears records we just not kept on early spark plugs. Was Champion's first spark plug for the Model T an [unmarked #7?] and when did the #31 appear?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 09:41 am:

The extra long Champion plug for the Fordson tractor, in 1918 was first with the brass top. The car version brass top followed a bit later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 09:50 am:

Bob I have a nice set of Edison #14, I think I will give a run and use them as a swap out set with the #13. Do you think 13 and 14 refer to the year ?.................


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Mettling on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 03:36 pm:

Champions were made in Toledo, Ohio right up until about 1993. They closed and moved to Mexico. My father worked there, my grandfather and I probably would have too.

anywhoo, here's a period pic for us.

http://www.toledofreepress.com/tag/champion-spark-plug/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, February 09, 2015 - 06:23 pm:

Bob Skingley: #13 Edison plugs have a double ground electrode, the #14 Edisons have one. The designation by the Edison Company denotes a spark plug for a specific application. Both are 1/2" pipe thread plugs.

We installed a set of #14's in the "old Man's" 1922 Touring about 3 years ago at the Glenmont estate garage in West Orange, NJ. The car has it's yearly public outing, being driven in the St. Patricks's Day Parade in West Orange. Other than that, it stays in the garage at the estate, now operated by the U.S. Park Service, along with the Laboratory buildings and it's Edison artifact collection.

Bob Jablonski


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