Amazing photos.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Amazing photos.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 08:58 pm:

These are some amazing photos. If it won't open, it is worth the copy and paste.


http://extras.denverpost.com/archive/captured.asp


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 09:33 pm:

Tom, thanks for the link. Looking at that time in color seems strange but makes it seem more "real" Im a retired Boilermaker so the welder pics as well as the railroad and shipyard pics is something I relate to .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

Gorgeous. Clear as a bell + the color's great. Well worth the look.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 09:54 pm:

Mostly 35mm slides, but a few are on 4x5 sheet film. Good old Kodachrome. I wonder how many people today could explain the source of the girls' dresses in #12 and #16.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 10:03 pm:

Steve, you are probably referring to flour sacks, but they may also have been from a "bolt" of material sold at the "Woolworth" store or the "five and dime" store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 10:23 pm:

Yes, it could be material from the five and dime, but a lot of clothes like that came from flour sacks and feed sacks. One of my aunts did a lot of sewing, so I had some feed sack shirts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 10:35 pm:

The museum I volunteer at has a wedding dress from back in the day on display that is made from flour sacks. It is beautiful and at first most people don't believe me when I tell them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 12:22 am:

Great set of photos. Although some of them remind me of how old I am. People were still not smiling in posed pictures. Did the better times after WWII change that? Just wondering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 12:40 am:


Whether we smiled or not depended on the circumstances. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 12:49 am:

Thanks for posting, Tom. I've seen these pictures before but they are well worth another look.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 01:21 am:

That last one of the worker from a carbon black plant was a blast from the past for me. I used to work for Columbia Carbon making carbon black and we looked like that when ever we had to go into the bag houses. Not a fun job. PK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 08:34 am:

Tom, thanks for posting this! You won't believe this, but I just got the same link in an e-mail from one of my Model T buddies this morning! Tried to copy and paste it to this, but stupid ol' Internet Explorer wouldn't let me! These are some fantastic pics, showing a lot of the difficult times in that era. Heart wrenching photo of the farm auction during the depression, where no doubt a family lost their livelihood to a greedy bank. And I wonder just how many of the kids in these photos just might be still alive today and appreciate seeing these again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 09:43 am:

Tim, You mentioning the "farm auction" and seeing the photo, reminds me of the term "penny auctions" During the depression when a farm was sold by the bank, for awhile the neighbors would agree to not bid on the property, and let the owner buy it back for a "penny". My grandparents lived near Yale Oklahoma during the depression. When their farm was sold by the bank, grandpa bought it back for 1.00. All the neighbors had agreed to not bid on the place and all the "young" men were stationed around the place to make sure there were no "outsiders" at the auction. Grandma said, that there was a couple car loads of bankers from the adjorning counties, that showed up at the sale. She said they were "severally thrashed" put back in their cars and told to "never come back to this county". It has also been part of our family history that the local sheriff was part of the "thrashers". It was a tough time back then. The practice did not last very long as the government made it a "crime" to "conspire to defraud" a banking institute or general commerce by agreeing to "withhold" a bid during a public auction. Even today, our local auction house has a huge sign on the wall with the law statutes posted for all to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 11:14 am:

Donnie, interesting info. That was a pretty cool way to "stick it to the man"! You would think the lousy banks would have enough heart and sense to do everything possible to keep the hard working farmer on his land. Especially when they sit down at the table and dive into a big juicy steak.

It was very interesting, if not sad, to see the weariness in so many sad faces of the period. It truly was a difficult time during the 30's and early 40's. Society today could never handle that kind of life. Not sure I could!


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