What is correct thread for drive shaft bearing stud

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What is correct thread for drive shaft bearing stud
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Magnus Wiberg on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 01:36 pm:

I need to know what is the correct size thread for the T drive shaft bearing stud T-2584?
I tried W 3/8-16 and the 16 threads per inch seemed correct, but diameter of the stud measures more like 10 mm, but a tap in M 10 has the wrong pitch to match the existing holes in the rear end!
Please, also help me with the stud front end thread size.
Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 01:51 pm:

I think those are an odd size. Something like 13/32. Someone should be along with the specs on the tip of their tongue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 02:41 pm:

13/32-16. Taps are available to chase threads.
Erik


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Magnus, they're 13/32 16 threads on the end that threads into the axle housings. I believe the nut end is a different thread but, am not sure.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 06:30 pm:

Magnus, the bits you need, studs and nuts, are available from the vendors. If it is the tap for the threads in the diff housing, Erik can point you in the right direction.

Otherwise, when I mounted a Moore gearbox and 13 tooth pinion combination in my roadster, I had to use bolts each end of the pinion spool rather than one long stud. The gearbox end was easy, but that odd thread in the diff was something else. In the end, I found that metric bolts, from memory 10m x 1.5 were a very close fit. I could wind them in until they began to intrude inside the diff. before they got a little bit tight.

This may or may not be of help.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 08:11 pm:

Stephen -- The nut ends of the studs are the same thread, 13/32". I know because I just bought a set of studs and nuts from Lang's. Those odd-sized castle nuts are $4/ea!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

Mike, interesting

Thanks,
Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 01:36 am:

Magus; where are you located someone in your area may have the tap you need. I know I do but have no idea where you are at. If you're close you can use it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 06:39 am:

Magnus lives some 300 miles north of me in Sweden, ( hej :-) ), 13/32" taps are even rarer here than in the US. The M10x1.5 idea might not be all bad, 1.5 mm per turn corresponds to 17 tpi and 13/32" diameter is 10.3 mm, both fairly close. About 1920 when Ford changed to the open pinion bearing spool, the studs were changed to bolts. The odd thread remained the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 11:34 am:

I found lots of taps on e-bay for 13/32 threads. In the 25 to 30 dollar price range plus shipping. (a few had free shipping)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 11:45 am:

For cleaning up a thread, two lengthwise cuts with the angle grinder on opposite sides of a used bolt is often good enough to make a thread chaser for limited use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

The tap for chasing holes is the easy one. Try finding a die for the studs or bolts. It's made of unobtanium.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By william matz on Sunday, February 15, 2015 - 02:32 pm:

this may or may not help..

search whitworth taps & dies.

or regal cutting tools

enjoying global warming here in wisconsin

good day

bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 07:37 pm:

I have a partial set of oversize taps and dies made by A.B. Jardine & Co. Hespler Ontario These were made very early possibly in the teens. They are antiques to day and sometimes can be found at swap meets. Some refer to these as 13/32 however on my set they are stamped 3/8 + 1/32. I have some old turn of the century railroad connecting bolts and they are 3/4 + 1/16 aka (13/16). There were complete oversize tap and die sets for special purposes. I wouldn't recommend using a metric equivelant. Be visulant at swap meets and look for the old wood box tap and die sets, many are the over size sets.
I can't help you specifically but A.B. Jardine & Co is interesting reading.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:21 am:

They don't always have the "+" sign. Oversize is assumed.


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