Old photo, city bus.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old photo, city bus.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 08:54 am:

West end of Toronto Ontario.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 10:34 am:

Thanks for sharing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 12:40 pm:

English bus, made in Maidstone.
Tilling Stevens became part of the Rootes empire.
Many of their Commer trucks in the 1950s and 60s were powered by the 'TS3' engine (TS for Tilling Stevens. This was a 3-cylinder, 6 piston supercharged 2-stroke diesel of 3.2 litres.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/31486821@N02/galleries/72157628859068527
Very light and efficient......and noisy. The noise they made is one of my childhood memories.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8k35_153Vw
(The opposed pistons were linked by rods to rockers to more rods to the crankshaft)

Maybe the most famous example was fitted to Ecurie Ecosse's racing car transporter:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/10488205/Ecurie-Ecosse-collection-fetches-8. 8-million.html
which made $13m 2 years ago. By far the highest price for any Rootes vehicle - eat your heart out you Sunbeam Tiger owners!
But I digress......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 02:56 pm:

The bus is a circa 1922 Tilling-tevens TS3A petrol-electric. The four cylinder petrol engine is directly coupled to a dynamo which then provides electricity to drive an electric motor that shaft drives the rear axle. The design was created to make it easier for bus drivers converting from horse buses. Their greatest difficulty was gear changing. The simple but rather inefficient system used more petrol though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 03:04 pm:

Sorry about the typing error - it should be Tillings-Stevens !!! The engine is a flat head with capacity of 5722cc and output of 40hp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 16, 2015 - 03:47 pm:

I too, remember the particular exhaust noise of the Commer two stroke motor, dubbed Commer knockers in Aus.In the late 50s, they dominated interstate transport in Australia. In the 60s, I liked to slipstream them in my T. That all came to an end with the introduction of International/Dodge petrol V8s. They were too fast for a T, and way faster than the old Commer knocker. If you had real money, the truck of choice was the R190 Inter.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 04:55 am:

The Tilling Stevens chassis , although mainly used, I believe, for busses, came in rather useful for other applications. Here is a photograph of a T.S. with a fire escape built onto it, and all electric powered from the T.S. dynamo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Partington on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 05:11 am:

Dan or maybe Alan, any photos extant of the Tilling Stevens buses used in Melbourne in the 20's & early 30's? They were of the TS3 type. My farther Arthur worked for the Melbourne Metropolitan Tramways Board (MMTB) prior to WW11 and I remember bed time stories of TS buses & of course Model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 10:57 am:

I must say I'm a bit surprised Toronto would go to the trouble of buying busses from England instead of getting something locally made. Must have been a good bus. It certainly is Toronto because the names in the destination sign are still in use today. That is bus # 8. Here is bus # 1 on the same route and in the same spot it appears, all dressed up for winter. It looks like a different make and model.



(Message edited by 404 not found on February 18, 2015)

(Message edited by 404 not found on February 18, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 04:50 am:

Doug, give me a few days, and I will have a hunt and see if I can find some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 12:12 pm:

Dave - the bus in your photo is another British one, either an AEC, Leyland or Daimler. The radiator muff hides the detail but the profile looks right. Almost certainly a locally built body. The Tilling Stevens chassis were used by travelling fairground people in UK, they could haul their loads and provide electricity on the fairground too. During World War II there were searchlight trucks mounted on Tilling Stevens chassis, the dynamo provide power for the huge searchlights to hunt Nazi planes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 05:09 am:

Doug, I have found a 'Demonstration Bus' for Melbourne-



I can't see enough detail on this one, but it does have some features similar to T.S.



Here is another 'maybe' from some years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 05:19 am:

Doug, a little more research and found this information along with a photo-



Summary:
Petrol Engine & Generator used by Melbourne heavy engineering firm Buchanan & Brock as a portable power supply to generate electrical power for welding equipment used in ship repair. This unit incorporates the engine and electrical dynamo from a Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric commercial vehicle.

In 1924-25 the Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board operated a fleet of 13, 33-seat petrol-electric Tilling-Stevens buses to provide passenger services including Elsternwick via High Street and St Kilda Beach via Swanston Street routes. The bodies for these buses were built by James Motors Pty Ltd in South Melbourne. The Tilling-Stevens system eliminated the need for a clutch and gearbox. The four-cylinder petrol engine was used to drive the front wheels and also powered a dynamo which in turn provided power to a an electric motor at the rear which drove the rear wheels. This system provided a smooth ride without the gear noise associated with the non-syncromesh transmissions of the period. The Melbourne agent for Tilling-Stevens was Horrocks, Roxburgh Pty Ltd.

Tilling-Stevens Motors Ltd of Maidstone, UK developed this system prior to the First World War. It represents an early form of hybrid petrol-electric vehicle technology.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 07:09 am:

Hi Dane - sorry to disagree with your comments, but the Tilling Stevens system drove only to the rear wheels, the front wheels were never driven and had no brakes either. I have driven two Tilling Stevens buses the TT1 and TS3 and neither were directly driven by the petrol engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 04:06 am:

Ian, I agree, only the rear wheels were driven. The 'Summary' is the notes that accompanied that photograph so were written by the museum curator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Partington on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 05:12 am:

Dane,WOW, many thanks my Dad worked at the Preston depot so I guess that would have been the High St buses. Tilling Stevens first came up in my bedtime stories when English Electric were building Diesel Electric locomotives for Queensland rail near where we lived. He was great on nothing is new under the sun messages.I still have the leather wallet he was presented with when he left the MMTB in August 1944 to bring us north to the warmer climate for health reasons. We overnighted near Cowra on the night of the Japanese breakout, I will have to write another book. Thanks again Doug


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