Oil to treat leather suitcase?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Oil to treat leather suitcase?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 02:05 am:

I bought this really neat 8"x14"x26" (big enough but small enough) heavy leather old fashioned type suitcase at a swap meet. It' not exactly like a hard sided suitcase, but the leather is so thick and tough that the suitcase is very rigid. My idea is to use it to carry wrenches, socket set, basic hand tools that are now in several small tool pouches, and perhaps a few small spare parts, etc., probably behind a transferable running board luggage fence on which ever Model "T" I might drive on club tours.

This suitcase of very thick and stiff cowhide is very old, very worn at corners and edges (just the right "patina") but still very strong and servicable. It is also very, very dry and looks like it would just love to soak up the right type of leather treatment oil. My problem is that I don't know just would be the right type of oil for this. Anybody know what might work well to preserve and protect such leather? Thanx,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 03:13 am:

Neat's foot oil is good for leather. Also, mink oil which you might find at a Redwing shoe store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 10:00 am:

Mink oil sounds too high-falutin' for a beat-up suitcase/tool box. I'd stick with the neatsfoot. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronald L Babb on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 10:07 am:

A product I use on old leather belting, jackets, car seats and the like is Leather Honey. It sure seems to work well and makes old leather belts serviceable again. Whatever product you do decide to use is going to darken the leather. If you aren't sure, try a small area that won't be seen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 10:42 am:

Ditto on the Neatsfoot oil. Been using it for years on boots and other leather stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neatsfoot_oil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:59 am:

Griot's Leather rejuvenator is absolutely the best professional leather rejuvenator out there. In addition to making your leather soft, flexible and supple, it will even make your leather smell like a new shoe store. You will need to put on several coats until it has been absorbed deep into the leather (you can't hardly put on too much). Instead of a rag, I like to paint it on with a good paintbrush and after it has dried and cured, put a coat of shoe polish on it. See the following thread.

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/133601.html

Post before and after pictures of the case when it is done.

Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:07 pm:

We can't agree on ANY kind of oil.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

Jim,

Why would I want my leather to smell like plastic? :-)

Sorry, I couldn't resist......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Ain't that the truth, Hal. I'm gonna keep checking this thread to see how long before somebody advises Harold to try MMO. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

Been a while since we heard anything about Modified Bitumen Roof Tar.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

I don't know how much Griot's Leather Rejuvenator costs but for the more frugally minded: my dad always used straight Vaseline on old saddles that were really dry and cracked. You can just slather it on and let the leather soak it up. When you reach the point it won't soak up any more wipe it down really well. Presto!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 05:57 am:

Pam pan coating also works well. easy to apply. I have used it for years and it has never hurt the leather. I have also used
WD-40 (fish oil). I use them both for my boots before I go out in the rain or do concrete work. My wife has used pam on her saddles as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 09:27 am:

John, I must take exception to WD40 as to it containing fish oil. It contains aliphatic hydrocarbon, petroleum base oil, and LVP aliphatic hydrocarbon. They do not recommend using it for applying to the skin or breathing the vapors. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 09:47 am:

I think that what I would do is to use Saddle Soap for cleaning first and then one of the other treatments.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

I thought Pam was nothing more than canola oil in a spray can. Couldn't swear to that, but that's what I've been told.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison North of Iowa on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 08:08 pm:

Lithium grease and used motor oil. It might as well look like it's been laying under the grease rack for awhile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 12:52 am:

Mike - Remind me to never ask you for advice on toothpaste! Ha, ha,.....

Thanks for the help guys,....I'll try a couple of those suggestions on the bottom and then make a decision,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison North of Iowa on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 08:12 am:

Ha! What's this toothpaste stuff you're talking about?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 09:56 am:

Just for grins I thought I would check out what the differences are between Neatsfoot oil and Mink oil that Red Wing Shoes reccomemds for it products.

I wore Red Wing work shoes for years when I was working full time and remembered the reasoning behind the use of Mink oil on leather products.

Check out the differences on Wikipedia between Neatsfoot and Mink oil.

Maybe Red Wing has a good reason for recommending Mink oil.

Opinions will vary!!


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