Old Photo - Brass Era - Danforth Garage

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Brass Era - Danforth Garage
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:25 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:56 am:

Is that a '12 T? Sure doesn't look dark blue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:31 pm:

Moline?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

I thought the sign may say "Moline' on the right, but maybe just "Gasoline"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 01:15 pm:

Looks like it may still be there. The '12 is gone.



1129 Kenmore Avenue, Kenmore, New York. This is a suburb of Buffalo, NY and was Danforth at the time of the old photo.

The houses next door are gone and some remodel has taken place. "The Garage Deli" aka Torches is just to the left of the current photo...

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 03:55 pm:

What was the building's original exterior?

Looks like stone. Maybe stamped metal?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 04:34 pm:

Textured concrete blocks.

http://www.totalracing.com/ebt/enginehs2.htm



(Message edited by cudaman on February 20, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 04:52 pm:

I think Keith is right, or at least close. That original siding was most likely either stamped metal or formed composite. In any event, it was not likely stone. If it was, why and how would you cover it with wood later?

Just my $.02 worth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 04:58 pm:

It looks like concrete blocks to me also? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 05:02 pm:

It's like Mark said. Very common construction from that era in some areas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 07:47 pm:

I was thinking it looks too good to be actual block construction esp when you compare it to the buildings around it. I was thinking along the lines of stamped steel that was zink coated then painted to look like stone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 08:08 pm:

No, I guarantee it's what Mark Strange says it is. During that time, the world was getting away from expensive stone block and we all know what plain concrete blocks look like. This textured block is indeed concrete and was designed to give sort of a stone block look. I know a friend who built his house himself back in the day with those blocks and I have seen many buildings like it. I could walk to one from where I live. Such construction was popular in an area like Buffalo where the picture was taken. I have noticed that the building materials used varied widely throughout North America depending on local availability so I'm not surprised if many have never seen these blocks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert C.(Bob) Borden on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 08:28 pm:

I doubt that the 2012 photo is the same building.
1.The molds for the textured concrete blocks were available to contractors and do-it yourselfers who may have cast the blocks on site. The window locations don't match, if original structure was block relocating the windows would be very difficult and costly.
2. the roof pitches are different. Why rip the roof off to do a remodel?
I suspect the original was damaged or destroyed by a fire or demolished for some other reason and the new structure erected on the existing foundation.
Just a guess based on 45 yrs. in construction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

You know Robert, I thought the same things for the same reasons. You just seem more certain of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:11 pm:

Whatever has been done, the place sure looks a lot better now.

America has done a fine job of sterilizing its landscape of all things cool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:14 pm:

where did the hill go?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:31 pm:

Roof pitch is different in the two pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison North of Iowa on Friday, February 20, 2015 - 11:37 pm:

That wasn't a hill. It was a pile from the livery. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 08:16 am:

This seems to cover the whole story:

http://www.mainememory.net/artifact/88032


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 08:38 am:

So it is covered in metal. Oops. I think I'm gonna go hide under a pile of sculptured concrete blocks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 08:44 am:

Peter and Walter have nailed it. I was so excited to know that I had figured out how to use the SnipIt tool. Oh well...

It was a pigment of my imagination and I have been snumped!

Thank you for the correction. It is a lot of fun trying to place the old photos.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 08:55 am:

We have a factory in Nevada Mo that makes metal siding also the decorations under eves and over the windows, just to name a few. This metal has a lot of zinc in it so it will stretch So I am going with metal, because this is a garage and not a high dollar building
Gene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 09:31 am:

Street View doesn't seem to be available for this little town. It's difficult to tell from the satellite image if it is still standing. They describe the area under the main floor as being accessed from Central St., but Depot St. surrounds Central on two sides, so it's kind of tricky to figure out what's what. There seem to be some blank spots, so maybe it's gone.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Depot+St,+Danforth,+ME+04424/@45.6590259,-67.8670877,256m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x4ca50c1e099dca89:0x3f3394 2f4a532c21


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 09:40 am:

Wow, amazing how they made the metal covering look just like textured concrete blocks! :-O

I stand corrected, thanks for the link, Walter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 09:49 am:

I thought it was cast concrete blocks as well. I've seen a lot of them like that. I'm still not convinced it's not. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 10:19 am:

The moon is made of green cheese!! It has to be true because there are never mistakes on the WWW. It looks like blocks to me!Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 10:41 am:

That's right, there are mistakes all over the internet.... MTFCA forum excluded, of course!

It doesn't matter to me one way or the other with what the building was sided, but since others seem so intent on pressing it, how would you tell this product:

http://wfnorman.com/products/siding/

.... from cast concrete block at a distance in a black-and-white photo?

It's interesting to identify its location in what looks to still be a neat little town. Perhaps a member up that way can do a drive-by and see if it's still standing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Walter,One thing sure at those prices maybe it was the first trump tower?? If siding i wonder where the corners are?? It's easy to see the corners in the sided building in the second picture.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 01:13 pm:

Like this one, the corners are probably a cap, or perhaps the corners themselves are stone:

http://www.westerntent.com/index.php/project-reports/bistro-provence

The economics of pressed tin must have worked at the time. It was either a lot cheaper to stamp out than all the manual labor necessary to dig stone, or today the lack of demand has caused the prices to go beyond being practical. In that same era, pressed tin ceilings were not uncommon, but today it is quite pricey, as well. Another angle to consider is it is probably takes way less labor to cover a building like that in tin rather than having to pay a mason, thereby justifying more expensive materials. Everything is a trade-off.


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