Help: Cooling Fan Rivets

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Help: Cooling Fan Rivets
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Oldland on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

My T threw a fan blade last week, and I've ordered the replacement blades & rivets, but my question is, what is the best way to set the rivets, are they hot or cold riveted, I cant seem to find the answers eslewhere but I'm sure a few of you guys have already done this before me.

About the T, its a 1915 Canadian built Australian car, I bought it as an unfinished restoration that had been mechanically restored 10 years previously but needed upholstery. so for the last couple of months have been fitting the upholstery, and repairing mechanically things that are not right. but keep finding little things like this that stop me from using the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

I would do them cold. There would be no way to heat them hot and keep the temp up long enough to install. The material used is soft and would compress fine. You might want to use a rivet set for that size.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Saturday, February 21, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

John; these are done cold.cput the rivet in from the front, set it on a solid backing board like a sheet of steel, then set it from the rear. Be sure to install all or at least a few rivets for the entire blade before setting any or they will not line up.

The club video for this is a good one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Oldland on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 01:05 am:

Thanks Gary

Club Video ? do you have a link for this ?

Regards John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 05:16 am:

John, mine were done cold also
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 02:03 pm:

The video is one of the ones you can purchase, but it isn't posted for viewing.

I looked at my fan and realized I told you backwards. The rivets are inserted from the hub side and set on the radiator side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:02 pm:

Here are the club videos: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/products/restoration-videos

The DVD about fan repair is 6-1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:39 pm:

John,

A friend of mine went through the same exercise to find that after all was done and assembled, the fan shook so bad it almost jumped off the engine. Trouble was, the new blades were made from material that varied greatly in thickness from one blade to the next, greatly upsetting the balance. Before you assemble your fan, check the thickness of each blade, or better yet weight them each. Hopefully this was related to one supplier and has since been corrected.

Revitting will work best if you use rivet sets.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#solid-rivet-tools/=w0v86e

Scroll down to "Installation Tools For Solid Rivets"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 04:35 pm:

Also, I have found the new blades are not bent like the originals. They won't pull enough air as a result. Check them against your originals, and if need be, re-shape them accordingly.

After getting nowhere fast with steel rivets, I used aluminum rivets on my '14 fan, which I painted after installation. It's been twelve years and all is still super solid. Looks good too! I have a lot extras; if you want I can send you some.

I may have had better luck with the steel rivets had I annealed them first. They seemed too hard to compress and expand properly and I was afraid they'd crack. The aluminum installed easily with great uniform compression and expansion.


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