Price check - Nice 1914 Touring car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Price check - Nice 1914 Touring car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 10:11 am:

I am a Model A guy, but have been looking for a nice 1914 Touring for a while. We set the budget at 20K and were willing to go 25 for the right car. I have looked at several 13 - 14 touring's in the 10 - 22K price range, and have generally not seen cars I would call nice enough.

I am a fussy engineer and want the car to be correct, complete, run well, and have nice paint. I do not want rocky mountain brakes, starter, etc. About 6 months ago, I came across a very nice '14 that was a Grand National winner in the nineties. I did not see it in person, but the pictures make the car look great, and it is restored to a level better than I wanted. The seller is very firm at 30K, which I believe to be fair, but it was a bit outside of my budget so I passed.

I kept thinking about the car, and still have not found anything else I would buy. I have been looking on and off for almost two years... Last week I talked with my wife, and she said if I want it, get a crowbar and open my wallet a little further and buy the grand national winner.

So with wife approval, we have plans to head down (about 6 hours away) with a trailer and a pile of cash in the next couple of weeks. Assuming it is as nice as the pictures make it look, it has approval to come home.

Prior to doing so, just wanted to get a pulse from the group. Is 30K to steep for a really nice '14 touring? I don't see many moving at that price, but then again I don't see many this nice...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 11:28 am:

Before you jump into buying a 1914 I will suggest, if you haven't, study what is correct for 1914, educate yourself. Things to look for (just a few); is the running gear correct? Is the car painted the correct color? Are the wheels correct for the year? Is the plumbing correct for the gas lights? Are the cowl and tail light correct for the year? How is the wood in the body? Are the coils and box correct? How has the car stood up for the past 20 some years? Was the engine fully rebuild or just over hauled? Does the seller have a paper trail. Does it have a TITLE or correct paper work for the state it's being sold in? What condition is the top and upholstery in? How are the tires? If the wheels are correct, what condition is the wood in? Has the rear end been rebuilt and brass thrust washers installed? What about the front axle? How is the steering, tight or sloppy?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 11:45 am:

Excellent advice by Mark. I once bid way too much on a 1914 which I didn't realize at the time was actually a 1915. Fortunately another bidder got it. My own ignorance could have cost me a bundle. Advertising is often wrong, not because the seller is crooked, but because he doesn't understand what he has. This car may be very correct in all regards, but it's best not to assume that. As they used to tell young reporters in the newspaper business, if your mother says she loves you, check it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 11:47 am:

I had a t expert friend review the pics and he thought it was pretty darn good except for the upside down horn...

https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=39ad2299635c63f9&id=39AD2299635C63F9%21828&parId= 39AD2299635C63F9%21910&ithint=folder%2C&authkey=%21APXOb5p4yh31IKE&v=3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

VERY NICE! As a buyer I would still want to know more about the running gear. Besides the horn being upside down, it might be wrong for the year. The scalloped edge on the mounting bracket was used in 1915 when it was mounted under the hood. Not to say it couldn't have been used earlier. I can't tell from the photos is it dark blue or black?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 12:38 pm:

not an expert, but i do watch nation wide craigs list, and ebay. that said, 30 grand is the very top of the market for any 1914. drivers go from 10 to 14, and real nice ones sometimes up to 20. that car looks nice, too nice for me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 12:47 pm:

Nice, but I doubt very much 30K's worth regardless of award standing. Incorrect coil box face plate and carburetor mixture rod bezel. For that kind of money, one would expect every receipt available that went into the restoration.
Here's what 12K purchased a few years ago - restored from an original car with all Ford factory sheet metal, fenders & all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 12:49 pm:

I kind of like the "over-restored" look with smoothed axle forgings, but for some reason to me it seems "wrong" to smooth the engine and head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 01:00 pm:

I have two '14 T's that are correct cars but they sure ain't as pretty as the one you are looking at. My only observation is that if you plan to use and enjoy your car it may not make sense to pay that much for a car at the top of the market because they don't stay like that for long if you really intend to use them and you can get a decent correct car for a lot less that you won't be afraid to use. But, if you really want one that is pristene and plan on spending more time admiring it than using it I doubt you will ever find one nicer than the one you are thinking about buying and I sure would like to have it sitting in my garage!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

Nice looking 14! With the shiny paint i could not tell if that is the right rear end?? Do all lamps match/work. Is the act gen in good shape? How does it drive? Engine shake or vibrate? Body numbers under the seat? The tires look old?? All the right coils? With the painted hub caps it looks like a very nice car and i have seen one a fellow payed 35,000 for.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

Go for it.....I have "overpaid" for three 1914 T's over the past 30 years, toured, tlc'd, and enjoyed them immensely. Sold them all for more than I paid. Have fun with your $$$, can't take it with you!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 01:08 pm:

That is nice. I really like the upholstery job, its not sloppy or loose fitting like most home jobs you see. I figure if you can afford it, go for it. Otherwise you will get a car that probably is not up to your level of restoration, and you will end up spending more than that to get it to the level you are happy with in the end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer in Troy, New York on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 02:30 pm:

Boy, one thing to be very careful of on these show cars restorations is if the owner or restorer rebuilt the engine and drive train to be a just show car or also a tour car.

Unfortunately AACA and most judging cares nothing about the mechanical condition of the car, only so long as it can get onto and off the show field under its own power, which means nothing.

My experience buying cars has been very bad this way. Every car I've bought from Model T's to Packards to Franklins has been sold to me claiming rebuilt engine, but EVERY one was far from it. As a result, I've gotten really good at engine rebuilding and going through the entire chassis, but it's cost me a bundle.

Ask the seller who did the engine. Was it someone well known? The seller should have no reservations about letting you call the rebuilder and quiz the guy over what was done in the rebuild process. Otherwise be fully prepared to pay $30,000 for a piece of garage art and THEN do a full mechanical restoration to get it on the road.

Sorry to sound negative, but I've been burned really, really bad over the years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 02:31 pm:

For 30K, the top doesn't impress me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 02:46 pm:

With that beautiful A Woody in the background, it was hard for me to concentrate on the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:08 pm:

Joe,
For what it's worth, I purchased this one in southern California just a year ago for $17,500. Normally, Calif prices are higher. This was totally redone before my purchase by Ray Wells, and the upholstery done by one of the best (but can't remember his name!).
My horn is also upside down, the quality of upholstery (top, seats, and interior door panels) seems to be a wash, I think my top looks better, but you have the correct wheels! (a big plus in my mind). My tires, tubes, and flaps are brand new. Mine has the gas headlights (plus or minus depending on how you intend to use it!). Ground up restoration of all original parts, including original engine, but rebuilt.
Whether you "over pay" for it depends on what you intend to do with it-- if you intend to flip it for a profit, there is a limit. If you intend to keep it and enjoy it to the fullest (like I have), there may not be a limit!
Use my comparison description and pictures for what they're worth, and good luck with your purchase. If you'd like any more pictures for bargaining purposes, just let me know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:18 pm:

Very, very nice looking car. Easy on the eyes! It's a looker and I have room for it in my shop.

It all sort of depends on what a fellow wants to do with it. Drive it or look at it.

I like to drive my cars and mine make this kind of car look real good on tour. However, I drive the whole tour and not on the trouble trailer.

For that sort of bucks, I would have to be able to crank it and go fifty miles without a blink. Take a T man with you that has some miles and experience under his belt.

Also, if it's for correct, not have to deal with the following:

(You asked us for comments and these will come up).

It is a fairly late 1914 by engine and the front fenders are the 1913 style without bills.

The speedometer would have to work. The swivel is disengaged tells me it is non-functional.

That is a beautiful car to have seemingly installed the top without pads.

The horn Mark talked about, Carb?, coil box bolts, etc.

It must be very hard to find one of these that actually runs well. There is one in our club in Houston. It is an absolutely stunning 1914 Touring AND HE DRIVES IT!

I follow David and always tell him I am there to make him look good. It's fun to point out specks of dust for him to clear away while we are on tour. Keeps him busy. <grin>

Ken in Texas with NOS dust and rust


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David C Jahnke on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:24 pm:

I would be very doubtful if that car is worth 30,000. If I were considering it, I would immediately factor in the cost of replacing the top as the fit looks terrible.

A car that was restored in the 90's is probably going to need a fair amount of mechanical work unless it was driven at least a little every year. Certainly, one would have to inspect it in person, and be knowledgable as to what is correct and what isn't. And look very carefully at if the wood is original or replaced. If replaced, was it done correctly.

If after a careful check of the car, you still want it, and are comfortable paying above market, then buy it. Just be aware that when it comes time to sell it, you will probably be taking a considerable financial hit. As long as you are aware and comfortable with that. then you will enjoy having it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:36 pm:

Patience is a virtue, I would wait till you find one in your budget. What will happen is you will spend the 30K and within a month of purchasing you'll find another for half the price and better condition, murphy's law.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 03:40 pm:

Joe -- There's some good advice given above. It's a beautiful car, but not $30K worth in my opinion. The AACA award badge is impressive, but those folks seem to know more about other cars than Model T's. For instance, "over restoration," such as polishing cast iron parts smooth, would call for point deductions in MTFCI judging. Whoever had it "restored" spent a lot of money on things like that polishing, but actually it makes the car worth less. I suppose the seller wants to get back what he spent on it, or even make a profit. That usually doesn't happen with Model T's. I think it's a $20K car. And by the way, whitewall tires with black treads weren't developed until about 1917. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David C Jahnke on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 04:08 pm:

I think you should also remember that a 30,000 car always cost more than 30,000! A 20+ year old restored car is going to need money spent on it once you get it unless you only plan to park it as is and not drive it - at all. And the more you plan to drive it, the more it is going to cost to make sure it is really road worthy, probably starting with new tires as they may be as old as the restoration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 07:25 pm:

Lots of good advice above.
I would stress again that $30K is on the high side of top dollar. For that kind of money you should get one of the best '14 Ts out there.
No one should ever expect to get all of their money back on any antique automobile. The good news is, that antique automobiles have a much better return on investment (less loss) than most major hobbies. Just check out the costs and depreciation for boats and airplanes. Things like travel, and even camping, can cost thousands and return only a few dollars if any.

I often tell people to figure out what it is that you want? And what is it that you expect to get from it? Then, if you can afford it, go for it. Paying a bit too much for something can be a good investment if it brings you joy.

Drive carefully, and do enjoy! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 07:48 pm:

One other thing that should be mentioned. Plan on chipping some paint and making a bit of a mess to check the rear end thrust washers. Although some of us learned earlier that Babbitt washers had become unsafe with age, in the '80s and '90s a lot of people were still using old ones if they looked good. There is a really good chance that a '14 would have had brass washers originally, however, for one reason or another, a lot of them got changed over the years and wound up with Babbitt washers. There is no good way to know for sure what is in there without opening up the rear end and looking. Even good looking Babbitt washers can break apart suddenly and can result in a total loss of service brake. And that could happen at the worst possible time.
A related aside. Even if you are wanting to keep the car as close as reasonable to 1914 correct? I would also make sure I had lined cast iron brake shoes inside the rear wheel drums instead of the original type all iron onto steel drum parking brake. The all iron wears out very quickly if used, and can become worthless before you know it.
While good after-market type outside brakes are somewhat better brakes, IF properly adjusted, the inside lined brakes can be used quite a bit and work adequately (at least by two wheel brake standards). And they cannot be seen when the wheels are in place. I have used the lined cast iron shoes in a couple brass Ts because I wanted them to look their year myself.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 08:43 pm:

I would drive the car, but it would probably see very limited use on the order of 50 miles a year...

I really enjoy Old Car Festival at Greenfield Village, so it would get 2 days of near constant use there. A friend has an annual car party, so I would take it there, and probably get ice cream a few times per summer. If it left the barn more than 5 times a year, I would be surprised.

I have heard a lot of people say it is not worth or barely worth 30K, and I kinda feel the same way. But I honestly have not seen a nicer '14 Touring for sale, and I can only buy something that is for sale... If someone knows of a nicer '14 Touring for $30K or less, please let me know. I want a black body, and brass / gas lamps so I am pretty much limited to a '14.

I have seen several cars close to $20K that needed a tear down and repaint for me to be happy with the paint, and generally had big parts incorrect like motor, front end, trans/hogshead, have not seen one functioning acet generator yet... I could easily see getting into those for over $30K and a bunch of time... The 20K cars I have seen, just aren't really that nice and I would rather spend 30 for something nice than 20 and put 10 or more into it...

I do agree that $30K is on the high side, and I appreciate everyone confirming that suspicion. But the market is not really full of beautiful '14 Tourings for sale. I have been looking for 2 years...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, February 22, 2015 - 09:24 pm:

You could not buy and restore another one to that nice for that amount of money. (Unless you get really lucky finding one that is close to that nice for a lot less). Only you can answer whether you can afford it or not. People like me cannot be that choosy about what they want, and need to appreciate what they can get and fix up.
Good luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 08:42 am:

Wayne is correct, $30,000 sounds like a lot for a 14. Whether you bought one that needed a complete restoration or bought a so-so car for $12-13,000, by the time you restored it, you would have way more into it than $30,000 if you paid to have any of the work done on it, especially body and paint work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 09:38 am:

Joe,We look forward to seeing you and your new 14 at the OCF!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 09:44 am:

Joe,

All the foregoing information is great!
For what it’s worth, I've read and re-read your original question many times, and wonder if you’d consider a few more thoughts?

You stated : ”I am a Model A guy”….consider , if you will that the As have 4 wheel brakes. You also stated : “I am a fussy engineer and want the car to …..run well…

Again, your words: “I do not want rocky mountain brakes, starter, etc.

If I may say, as I own both As and Ts,….please consider your desire to apparently use the car for pleasant journeys, rather than have it sit in a showroom and be admired. Most T drivers that I have read about or have talked to, think that an accessory brake system is very desirable….Ts just don’t stop in as short a distance as an A.

Please do yourself (and your wallet) a favor---find a friend that has a T, and let that friend allow you to drive his car for a few hours. Take it on “back roads” until you are comfortable driving it, then drive it in areas that you plan on driving your new acquisition – take it into traffic….stall it at an intersection….and DO NOT use his electric starter, if so equipped - get out and crank it in traffic! Get some experience driving and starting – by cranking – a T and STOPPING it.

That is one beautiful auto you are considering….I sincerely hope that you have some experience starting, driving, and stopping it before you invest that much into it. The pre 1927 Fords are very different than later models.

Whichever way you go, may you have many, many happy years behind the wheel of a T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 09:55 am:

Pretty car - as a '14 is it supposed to be black? Ya'll have forgotten more about these than I know. I thought that the cars were usually a color other than black until '15. Just curious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 10:17 am:

You could offer him 25K and you might be happily surprised.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 11:31 am:

Just buy it. The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price.

At 50 miles a year it would be a great looker and all it has to do is run good enough to load and unload it off a trailer.

I bought my first T like that. I told the seller don't call me to bring the trailer and money until it will drive on a trailer. It is still not a looker, it is a driver. I am good with that because I have over 7,000 miles on it and drove it last night.

It really does need a top job though and the #2 and #3 bow profile is not right (for me). Just my 2c worth and I top my own cars.

Total efficacy and it doesn't have to make cents. It is along the same line as paying $12 for a cup of cold beer at the ball park. It tastes better if it costs more!

We don't flinch when we go $55,000 on a new Suburban and $10,000 for a trailer to haul cars around (don't forget the "shop" some have). Cheapest thing about that whole affair is the Model T. Buy it!!

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 04:13 pm:

I had a '29 Model A Tudor.
It went to Germany........the T's are here in the shed.
I enjoy driving the T's far more than I ever did the A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 05:03 pm:

To answer Seth's question. Yes, a 1914 should be black. To muddy the waters a bit, there is still a little debate about a few original cars and exactly when the changes were made. The proper color (if I recall correctly) for a 1913 is dark blue on both the touring and runabout. Because of the notorious weakness in the rear section of the touring body, the construction (including the door shape) was changed late in the 1913 model year (first later style generally accepted as around July'13). As with most things model T, there was a fair amount of time where both styles would be leaving the factory.
Some 1914 style Ts were painted blue originally. They may only have been 1913 model year cars, although several people have claimed very early '14 model year cars as having been blue (I am not convinced about that).
There has been evidence that a few '13s were painted dark green, and at least one very original '13 that only shows red on the body, and is known to date way back. These colors are still debatable for 1913s. (Except that I know the fellow that used to own the red '13? I probably wouldn't believe it myself.)
There is also good evidence that some coupelets and sedans from late calender year '14 through 1918 were painted dark blue, and maybe even some a dark green. There is also good evidence that some commercial sales would occasionally be painted something other than black, and leave the factory that way.
However, for all practical, and reasonable, purposes. 1913 and 1912 were dark blue. 1911 and earlier varied, green, blue, red, and gray were used on bodies. Depending on year, fenders may have been black or may have been body color.
1914 through 1925, again for all practical, and reasonable, purposes, were black.
1926 and 1927 were a whole new ball of wax.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Right or wrong i have seen Canadian cars painted blue?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 06:23 pm:

Bravo Ken Parker!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 06:33 pm:

Simple facts that I see:
It's a 20 year old restoration and it still looks like it's never been driven. That should tell you something about whether or not it's a proven tour car.
The top is not correctly installed.
The engine is so over restored that it doesn't even look like a Model T engine anymore.
The mixture rod bezel is not correct.
The side lamps don't appear to be the style consistent with the build date.
The whitewall tires that it's wearing have not been available new for over a decade.
$30,000 should buy you a current, top quality, correct restoration of a '14 Touring. Look for a Stynoski calibre car, not an AACA fit and finish car from 20 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 07:24 pm:

Its a shame when a T can't pull the big numbers other cars demand. Heck, my 47 Harley motorcycle is worth more than 30k.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 07:36 pm:

Simple supply and demand, but I agree T's should be more valuable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Monday, February 23, 2015 - 09:03 pm:

I appreciate all the comments.

I have only logged about 15 - 20 miles of driving in a T, but I do understand how poor the brakes are. I rarely take my Model A over 40MPH, and based on my experience so far with the T, I think I would be comfy around 20MPH. Use on public roads would be limited to low traffic areas.

My wife and I are both automotive engineers (I work for GM, she works for Ford) and the Model T is a significant part of the reason we have the ability to have such rewarding jobs. We both want one, and when we think of a T, the '14 touring is the iconic image that comes to mind. We want not only the 1914 look, but the total experience, bad brakes, crank start and all...

A current Stynoski caliber '14 touring would be great, but none are for sale. I have been looking for over 2 years and honestly have not found anything close to this one from a quality perspective.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

So I am heading to Iowa this coming weekend to look at the car. On the way I think I will try to stop and look at another one. Similar pricepoint, but does not look as nice and has been for sale for over a year

http://www.volocars.com/1914-ford-model-t-brass-touring-c-3381.htm#sthash.OIsg5f 15.dpbs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQJtIubMbGs

Wish me luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:25 pm:

You might ask why that Volo car's rear end had to be reinforced with a truss rod. They weren't standard equipment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

Just a period accessory, like the shocks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

Nice car. I have a rear truss just like that on my 14. The truss was an accessory, very sought after today.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/129976.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:49 pm:

Further about the "Volvo" car...

what does this mean: "Engine has been updated to run unleaded fuel" ?

AND

Ask around (the Forum) about those front "shocks" before you drive the vehicle...(please).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:49 pm:

I agree,. The '14 Touring is the quintessential Model T. I sure love mine. Don't let the naysayers get you off track about starters or distributors. My kids enjoy showing off how easy it is to hand crank a well maintained car.

The Model T experience is captivating. I hope you enjoy whichever car that you decide upon. If you have to pay a little more than you want to get exactly the car that you want, you'll soon forget about the money spent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:52 pm:

I agree,. The '14 Touring is the quintessential Model T. I sure love mine. Don't let the naysayers get you off track about starters or distributors. My kids enjoy showing off how easy it is to hand crank a well maintained car.

The Model T experience is captivating. I hope you enjoy whichever car that you decide upon. If you have to pay a little more than you want to get exactly the car that you want, you'll soon forget about the money spent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 08:52 pm:

Oops, sorry for the double post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

I looked at Volo Cars last summer. Not impressed. They are just a reseller. Based on the condition of the cars that I saw, the prices were way too high. Just a note of warning.

Tap all the spokes. Maybe take a small Dixie cup and drain a little oil. For 30K it pays to be persnickety.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 09:51 pm:

About three years ago there was a Model T ad that ran in Hemmings for several months with that idiotic line about "remachined for unleaded fuel". I think that one was in Florida, but I wonder if this might be the same car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 11:49 am:

It looks like the Volo car has Rootlieb splash shields (no crease).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 12:08 pm:

This was my '14- sold for $18,500- just for a reference point.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 09:05 pm:

I contacted Volo and their car sold, so I will only be looking at one this weekend. I asked Volo what it sold for, and have not heard back. If the Volo car brought nearly 30, 30 for the AACA car seems reasonable.

-Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 10:06 pm:

Joe, it would serve you well, to heed the advice of the "old timers" here. The first response by Mark, is right on the money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 01:30 am:

It's beautiful. Too beautiful. As others have pointed out, over-restoration resulting in a glossy undercarriage and engine (!) is a big minus, not a plus. If you want to replace the incorrect tires and the miserable top, that will add another grand or two to the cost. I wonder why, with forty pictures (many of them virtually identical), we don't see both sides of the engine. I'd say the neighborhood of twenty grand is reasonable, twenty-five pricey but not outrageous, and thirty over the (miserable) top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 09:10 pm:

Weather has caused us to postpone the trip a few weeks. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 09:33 pm:

Look on the bright side -- Maybe a better one will turn up during that time. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

I went down this weekend to take a look at it.

It was by far the nicest car I have seen for sale, but it was not quite as nice as the pictures made it look. There are several little things wrong with it, but all to be expected from a 25 year old restoration. Although not perfect, it followed me home... For those that are curious, I had to give $27,500 for it. I think it is more like a $25K car, but it is not like these are a commodity and if I wanted the car, that was the price.

Expect to see lots of questions on the forum as I learn more about Ts. It is a little hard to start, and I suspect the bands could use adjustment as it is easier when you jack a wheel off the ground...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 07:32 pm:

Congrats, post some pictures of it when you can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 07:38 pm:

I saw your thread title and looked in, wondering. Did he get it? Did he get it? Did he get it?
Congratulations!
And don't forget the photos.
Do drive carefully, and enjoy it a lot! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 08:05 pm:

Good,luck with the car. I have two '14' and love them both. Your starting issue will probably go away if you start using the car more often and change the oil to a lighter weight. I live in Florida and can get away with straight 30wt but when I lived in NY I used 10-30wt in the winter. That said, with a bad back these day I jack up a wheel to start cold most of the time because every little bit helps. The more you use them the better and more reliable they get. Go through it from one end to the other first and then run the wheels off it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 08:45 pm:

Thanks for all the kind words. It is a nice car and I am very happy to have it. I plan on taking it to Old Car Festival this year.

If anyone in the South East Michigan area wants to help a model T noob out with some of the basics, I would appreciate it. I figure things like adjusting the coils, adjusting the bands, adjusting the parking brake (Does not do very much right now), and cleaning timer, getting the acetylene lights going, etc. All things I read about on the forum, but having an experienced person nearby would be helpful...

I will try for pics soon. I am in the middle of moving houses, and the new place does not have internet yet...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Nikolajevs on Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 10:48 am:

Joe,
Congratulations on your purchase! you may want to consider joining the Piquette Ts and/or the Casual T'sto meet some members in the Southeast Michigan area that can help you out.
You are also welcome to attend, as is everyone else on the forum, the World's Most "T"-riffic Shop Talk which will be held at the Piquette Plant on May 9. http://www.piquettets.org/2015shoptalk.pdf

Topics will include:
rebuilding Model T coils
Model T cooling systems
Model T fans
Fine Tuning the Model T Anderson Timers. (Time permitting)

We will also have a SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER from North Carolina’s “Classic Wood Products” to share with us how his company manufactures replacement wood parts for Model T’s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Sunday, April 26, 2015 - 08:41 am:

thanks for the tip. I joined piquett ts a while ago, but have only made it to one event so far. I will probably hit the may 9 event.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 09:52 am:

Sorry it took so long to post pics. I am in the middle of moving houses. Anyway this should be a link to some pics of the new T in her new home.


https://plus.google.com/110990974144778449137/posts/6tz7xDPG7sq

Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 09:54 am:

Very nice, I like the floor too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 02:22 pm:

Floor was cheaper to put in than most people think. Armstrong vct was about 50 cents a foot. Everything installed and waxed was ubder two bucks a square foot.


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