OT - 1905 Ford Motor Company Export Catalog

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT - 1905 Ford Motor Company Export Catalog
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 07:55 pm:

The Harvard Business School had this in their library. They were kind enough to scan and provide a link:

http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HBS.Baker.GEN:14022554-2015

I thought it was an interesting book, with drawings and descriptions of models A, B, C and delivery car. Below are a couple of the pages, including the shipping cost to several foreign cities:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 08:29 am:

Thanks Rob those are some pictures I hadn't seen before.

Were they still selling Model A Fords in 1905?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 11:44 am:

Very interesting :-)
Didn't know Fords had a foot throttle for Model A and C.

Oil consumption was huge in those early engines - all models had oil tank capacity for only 100 miles ( = 3 pints in the A and C) while the gas tank in the Model C was enough for 180 miles (9 gallons) so back then you really had to stop to fill oil and check the gasoline :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Herb,
The Ford Board of Directors approved continued production of the Model A at this late Oct 1904 board meeting:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 07:26 pm:

Thanks Rob.
You can find it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 08:46 pm:

I'm surprised that shipment to Valparaiso, Auckland, Melbourne and Sydney were from New York. The Panama Canal didn't exist yet, so the ship would have had to go through either Suez or the Strait of Magellan. It's hard to believe that was either quicker or cheaper than going by train to a west coast port and shipping from there.

This is fascinating stuff, especially in the dead of this interminable winter when the old cars are snowed in and the roads are salted up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 04:15 am:

Surely the shipping route would be across the Atlantic, through to the Indian Ocean thence to Australia and New Zealand.

That is the route followed by some of the sailing ships pressed into service during WW1.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 08:02 am:

Rob,

Great find! Thank you for sharing it.

Favor to ask -- please consider keeping some sort of index, table of contents, or even just a running log on what you find where. Many of us (or at least me) don't have the time to follow up on items like this as much as we would like to this year. But in a few more years I am hoping to be able to spend more time trying to work with others to help put the puzzle pieces together. And knowing which locations have which color (blue, brown, etc.) pieces should help with future research. I try to save the ones I read but I know I miss a lot of them. And as long as the forum is available folks will be able to use Google and other search engines. But if the forum disappeared (which it did at least once in the past) then having a source list would be a big help.

I believe the location of the export agent in New York, New York probably had more of an impact on where they were shipped out of rather than just looking for the lowest shipment. In the book "American Business Abroad - Ford on Six Continents" it notes on page 434 that R.M. Lockwood was the export head and foreign department manager on a commission basis from 1903-1910 and was replaced in 1910 by H.B. Harper. On page 436 they note that for 1903 & 1904 there were less than 100 cars shipped each year. The remaining dates 1905-1923 with the exception of 1907 the number of foreign shipments from Ford USA were listed as not available. But for 1907 it listed 350 vehicles exported. My "guess/theory" is that in the early days -- Ford looked for an already well established export company to handle selling & shipping Fords overseas. The company was already successful and initially the car shipments would have been a little extra profit but not significant. Basically if a customer wanted a Ford they paid the shipping or came over an purchased the car and shipped it back at their own expense and trouble. Clearly as production increased the importance and profit from shipping cars would have increased also.

It would be nice if someone could compare the cost of shipping by train to the west coast and then by cargo ship as compared to shipping by cargo ship from NY without having to trans-load the cars from trains to ships etc. back then. But even with a substantial savings, I don't think R.M. Lockwood could have paid to open a new office on the west coast solely from the profits of shipping cars.

Of even greater interest to me is that the catalog is dated 1905. Ford of Canada had the exclusive right to sell Fords to the entire Commonwealth countries starting from Ford of Canada was incorporated in the Fall of 1904. On page 45 of "In the Shadow of Detroit" it states, "Between Sep & Dec [1906 is implied], working through [R.M.] Lockwood and various shipping firms, Ford Canada sent vehicles (mostly Model Ns) to Australia, New Zealand, India, Egypt, and Natal (South Africa)." So I wonder if someone contacted R.M. Lockwood they were shipped a USA car if they were not part of the British Commonwealth or a Canadian car if they were part of the British Commonwealth? [Note Ford of Canada held the right even to the UK sale until Dec 1, 1907 when they waived those rights for Percival Perry who was working to get Ford of England going. ref page 7 of " The English Model Ford vol 1".] So I suspect but do NOT have proof that the majority of the 1905 cars sent to Commonwealth countries would have been assembled with USA chassis and Canadian produced bodies, wheels, & fenders (later lights etc.). If anyone has additional documentation on that -- please let us know.

There is so much more to re-discover and better document. Thanks to all of you for your support to our hobby and especially those who are helping to better document what happened or providing us resources to help us document what happened. And if any of you enjoy research and would like to start helping us with research or to help us form that core team of 1903-1927 Ford researchers – please drop me an e-mail or private message. I already have several names and as one person said, “If you wait for perfect circumstances before you start – you will never get started.”

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 08:33 pm:

According to this 1901 "New York Railroad Club" account, it cost less to ship from New York to the anywhere in the Orient than to ship (I presume by rail) from New York to San Francisco.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 09:25 pm:

I continue to learn new things from these posts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 03:25 am:

The normal shipping route in those days was east coast USA to Australia and New Zealand via Africa. Ford Canada was able to get good rates because of the volume of freight they were sending. The appointed Australian Distributors had their office in New York as they were in the business of importing timber to Australia. They took on the Ford Agency after being approached by the Ford Company.

This was the best route as most of the industries were on the east side of the country. Ships were plentiful on the east for freight. On the West coast shipping was mainly for passenger traffic. The ships were different. Freight went from country to country stopping to offload freight and the time taken was longer. Passenger ships were faster and able to load and unload their cargo( people) a lot faster, not many Fords could be carried on a passenger ship.

The only time the West coast was used by Ford Canada was during the war when they tried to ship cars to Australia and New Zealand, the east coast docks and rail ways had become gridlocked due to the war and it was nearly impossible to get Fords to the docks. Ford Canada tried to ship via the West coast and only was able to send a few. Once the West coast shipping companies realised they had the upper hand they tripled the price for any freight for the few ships on that side of the country able to carry the cars. It became so expensive and hard to get room on any ships that the Australian and New Zealand companies were told " shipping may be impossible in the future." 1917.

It nearly did, Fords of 1917 -18 -19 years are rare here. Fords dealers were forced to take orders and only a few cars trickled through. and it took 3 years after the war before supplies caught up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 10:42 am:

Offloading in North Bend, Oregon, 1914:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 12:00 pm:

Great photo Ricks.
Hope you are doing well!
Joe in Mo.


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