1926 Roadster Sheet Metal Thickness

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1926 Roadster Sheet Metal Thickness
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gregory J Crites on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 08:22 pm:

Hi this has probably been ask before and I've look on the Forum and asked a couple of friends. What is the thickness of the metal on a 1926 model T Ford roadster. I understand the body was one thickness, the fenders were another and the running boards were another. Can anyone help me out?
Thank You
Greg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, February 27, 2015 - 11:26 pm:

Which part? I think the metal gauge standards were a little different back then and they're still a moving target but you can't go wrong with CR 1008 20ga. (~.036") on body panels and door skins. The running boards are much thicker. More than most shops are set up to handle. I have not measured 26/27 fenders but I doubt they are a different thickness than earlier ones. The forming and mounting made them stronger and feel thicker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 10:55 am:

Gregory. I have a 26 roadster and will be happy to go out and mic. any parts you need. The car has paint on it but you should get an idea of the right gauge. If you are in So. Cal you can drop by.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 11:56 am:

Ken is correct. The older bodies and the later bodies are 18 and 19. Henry rolled their own sheet stock. It is the additives that we do not know about what they used. DO NOT USE any galvanized sheet stock!!! I have in the past and it is more trouble than it is worth. The galvanizing is applied with heat and it holds by capillary action. Same is true whenever you try and braze something!!! If you do braze on your car it will not hold paint well and will usually crack later on! Then the ONLY way it can be repaired is by cutting it all out "completely" and welding in a patch piece. Finish by peening the repair too. The forging process makes it more ductile. Called hammer welding. I use to teach this to my restoration classes in Ft. Myers and Tampa. We use this technique on restorations and in building up hot rods.
Not trying to change this thread just thought some of you all who MIGHT read this "winter slow down thread" could use this bit of information. There are many of you all who I am sure do it differently. And that is good if it works and stands the test of time!
If you are using the plenishing forming machine go heavier (thicker) and same if you are wheeling. If you are using the paper pattern forming process I have mentioned on this Forum before use the 20 gauge. Howell's replacement panels are good or close and with work will save you some time. The older Howell's were much better but I hear the new owner is coming along with improvements. There is lots of information for the MAKING of 26-7 Ford sections on the HAMB Popular Hot Rodding and on this forum. Ask Hap.
I want you to remember one thing,....Just DO it! If there is a mistake then redo it. If it doesn't turn out perfect... make a hot rod out of it!!!!
Note to the wise T'ers speedsters and go-jobs! Pronounced Gowjobs were ALL hot rods!!!!!!!!!!
Joe in Mo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 02:55 pm:

I measured a few 26/27 body parts down in my garage.. The main body parts, a front fender and a splash apron were all 0.041" thick.

The running board was about 0.069" thick.
The firewall and the rear subframe was 0.087" and some reinforcements like the front frame mount was about 0.096".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 07:29 pm:

Were those measurements over new steel, rust or paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, March 01, 2015 - 03:49 am:

The measures were over good original edges with minor surface rust or a thin layer of primer.
Measured with a vernier caliper, not a micrometer so it may be off some. My fenders are likely english made, since that was where the Copenhagen factory got their fenders, but my 27 roadster body is a USA import.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Dupree on Sunday, March 01, 2015 - 11:10 am:

.041 steel is 19ga. Used for automotive fenders for a number of years, but not commonly available at tin shops today.

.069 is 15 ga

.087 is 13 ga

Typically most steel supply houses stock the even gauges in cold rolled steel, like 20 ga, 18 ga, 16 ga etc

Ron Dupree


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