Time spent on cleaning T parts for restoring

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Time spent on cleaning T parts for restoring
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

For me it seems like seventy five percent of my time is spent cleaning parts for restoring.

The sand blast attachment for a power washer speeds up the initial first part, and if the power washer has a soap dispenser many types of grease removers can be used.

Then you have flash rust that an electrolysis tank removes without the grime and oil much easier for the second part and relatively inexpensive.

Glass beads are expensive and ruins fast if the first two steps are left out.

Just wondering if someone has found a magic way cleaning up parts.

I am currently modifying a bead blast cabinet for engine size parts for the final clean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 03:00 pm:

A son 12-15 years old will do wonders for nasty parts.:-) Mine is too old for that now and is cleaning his own nasty parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 04:04 pm:

I put up a youtube video about soda blasting model t wheels, that particular set of wheels I did not dismount the tires, the soda blasting is designed to gently remove the paint off the wooden spokes that were questionable at best before hand, stripping them proved my suspicions. It also stripped the scale off the metal parts, a quick sand blasting of the metal parts, with the wooden parts covered, and wiped down with mineral sprits the wheels were ready for primer. Those wheels were ok for a roller chassis but not for on road use.

http://youtu.be/EQXSX06IwVw

For particular difficult pieces, I use a sand blast cabinet with different types of media.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Brown - Austin, Texas on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 04:16 pm:

Check out this previous discussion:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/223017.html?1310536193

I have a lot of success with the molasses method and its cheap. Others swear by Evaporust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 06:02 pm:

Hal,
12-15 year old grandsons work just as well! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Husa on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 06:08 pm:

I use phosphoric acid. (a chemical fertilizer) to remove rust! It leaves the parts a dull BLACKISH color. I am always concerned about the time it takes. If left too long you have nothing left!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 07:08 pm:

90% of restoration is cleaning or sanding or something less glamorous than washing dishes. My children and grandchildren get bored and have no interest in that part. I now wet sand the rusty parts while listening to videos, the radio or daydreaming strange things. If it was easy everybody would be doing it.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 09:36 pm:

Take the parts in and have hot or cold tanked. Saves cleaning up the mess when your done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 07:48 am:

I have used straight muriatic acid many times, like any acid you must follow all safety steps. It will take you to bright metal very fast then neutralize with soda and water do a quick heat dry and you are good to go. I am impatient when it comes to rust removal so this way is the best way for me. A thankless and nasty job regardless of your method. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 07:54 am:

Looks like what I do works as well as other methods if not better and faster then some. Hot or cold tanks are just about gone in our area and most of my issues are with heavy parts not sheet metal.
Thanks for the response!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Conte on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 08:44 am:

The spokes in the soda blast video look bad. One looks like it's ready to split in two.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 08:53 am:

What are you talking about Paul!? The cleaning and wire brushing and sanding and scrubbing IS the fun part! LOL

I will say that when I've convinced my dad or wife or anyone standing too close to the garage for too long to come help it goes more than twice as fast.

Have to be careful though: I was wire brushing some small nuts and bolts on a bench grinder while I had my wife working on something beside me. Anyone who has done this for any length of time has experienced the following: One of the nuts slipped a little and got snatched away by the wire brush and launched at light speed out the back of the grinder, zinged off the wall, and then ricocheted around the garage for a bit. While I've experienced that countless times the ferocity with which the wire brush launches small parts always scares me as I don't want to get hit with whatever is flying around. I usually just jump, and then either cuss or laugh and retrieve the part. I've never been hit with anything before, but my dad one time had a nut that was small enough to get snatched away but too big to exit the back - (almost in tears laughing about this as I type) it went all the around and shot him in the stomach. He was so angry, I don't remember the last time I laughed that hard.

My wife, experiencing all of this much to close for comfort for the first time, looked at me with big eyes, calmly set down what she was working on and walked out of the garage without a word. HAHAHAHAH!! It was hilarious. I couldn't get her to come back that day but she has since come back to help sometimes. She still won't work next to me though if I'm wire brushing anything. I laugh about it because I've told her most things are too big to get projectiled at Warp Factor 7, but she doesn't care. In her mind bench grinder wire brushing = things zipping around the garage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 09:11 am:

Used Caustic Soda with water in a 55 gal. drum when I was a kid in the 60's. 27 rims came out great along with a lot of other parts. Cleaned a vaporizer manifold - ate the die cast Ventura up. Spent years trying to make it run. Finally got the MTFCA carb. book around 2000, after reading about it on the Forum and realized I didn't a Ventura. Cut one and got it working after all those years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 09:20 am:

Went to emergency big time once breathing vapor from a leaking heater core starting in Portland just ninety miles home. Then argued with the doctor that the reason was antifreeze not an exhaust leak in my truck. The next day I took a gallon of antifreeze to the hospital with the warning that antifreeze is dangerous inhaling as well as ingestion or a cut. The doctor had called poison control twice with the wrong information given him. I don't like using heavy duty chemicals.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration