OT -- Uncle Stan's Radio Show

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT -- Uncle Stan's Radio Show
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 06:51 pm:

Don't forget to tune in to Uncle Stan's radio show tomorrow (Tuesday). It's at 2:06 p.m. Mountain time on Montana Public Radio, www.MTPR.org.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 08:16 pm:

Thanks, Mike.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 08:28 pm:

Thanks Mike. If you have never listened to a story by Stan, you need to tune in......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 09:02 pm:

I don't know if it is still in print but I highly recommend:
"The Adventures of Herman and Freida"
A collection of delightful and very entertaining short stories by Stan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 11:25 pm:

"If you have never listened to a story by Stan..."

Rob -- I've known Stan for several years. I've heard a story or two in that time. :-)

Kirk, -- I agree. Herman and Freida is some great reading matter. If Uncle Stan gets enough requests, maybe he'll print some more copies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, March 02, 2015 - 11:45 pm:

Thanks, guys. You're right, First hour of the folk show Tuesday, March 3, 2:06 PM. MTPR.ORG

I thought I might have some time this winter to work on Herman and Freida a little and print some more copies but it is the 1st of March, I don't have a day off until well into April between Auctions, Carburetors, Kids and some Music things going on. Maybe next winter I can do something with it. Thanks for the encouragement.

One of the things I regret is that we did not record my opening night show at the Cochrane, Alberta tour about ten years ago. I seldom have the chance to tell stories anymore but that night read a little from Herman and Freida and told about Nomer Nansard and the TT Twuck with the Buzz Toils and the Rectum Rearend at the request of Roy from Crossfield. Bud Peters was in the audience and had one of those laughs that just infects the whole crowd, he knew Nomer and had heard Nomer tell about the TT Twuck with the Rectum Rearend and started laughing before I even started to tell the story. It was probably the biggest audience reaction I had ever had to any of my Model T stories and the best I ever told about Nomer. Now Nomer is gone, Bud is gone and I haven't told the story for years. It was a missed opportunity and one that wouldn't have been missed if any of us had just thought to put a tape in the recorder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 12:37 am:

I will be at work but I have nothing on my calendar at that time. I will tune in to hear the show!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Guys, Stan knows that there's a lot of us faithful fans of his who are waiting for more about Herman and Freida. We've been waiting patiently ever since shortly after the first Adventures of Herman and Frieda came out.

Someday we hope to be pleasantly surprised when Stan says "here it is!"

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 01:19 pm:

Are these shows archived for streaming at other times outside of the live broadcast?

I listen to the Model T era music broadcast on Rich Conaty's The Big Broadcast every week this way.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 04:44 pm:

Great stuff! Bob Wills is smiling. And thanks especially for the piano pieces. Nineteenth century songs are the best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, March 03, 2015 - 05:52 pm:

Thanks. Dave was the only guy I knew who could play those songs on a piano and have them sound like it was a player piano. Probably other guys that can do it but he was the only one I knew. He was a great guy.

Paul, the shows are not archived due to music licensing restrictions. Public radio can legally play any song one time on any show, our policy is that we do not repeat shows or songs unnecessarily and do not make them available so as to support the sales of CD's and downloads for the musicians. The play list is posted at the MTPR site within a few days of the show airing.

I also do not supply copies of my shows unless someone asks for a copy who was played on the show or if their kid was, etc. I don't have time to fool with making copies and mailing them out, etc., and can't sell them because of copyright and licensing restrictions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 08:43 am:

Enjoyed the show. Have added it to my calendar in the kitchen every month.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 11:36 am:

Hey uncle Stan! Have you ever played my polka band's CD? I thought your people would especially enjoy the 'Ya Sure, You Betcha' polka. No, I don't need a copy but I'm looking forward to the Chickasha Rendevous.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 11:55 am:

I understand about the licensing restrictions. I was in a banjo band for a decade that had a regular gig at a restaurant. The licensing (ASCAP?) folks came to see the owner and extorted money out of him for each performance. Our newest music was 75 years old so this is hard to understand. Happily for us, he liked the music & our band had developed a large regular following so we were able to keep playing.

The place failed during the last depression and our band leader has been unable to find another place willing to take us on since. If it were not for the added burden of the license fees, we might well be playing our 100 year old music still.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money - Braidwood, IL on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

When is it on again?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 07:12 pm:

Doug -- It's the first Tuesday of each month at 2:06 p.m. www.mtpr.org.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 07:12 pm:

That's 2:06 p.m. in the Mountain time zone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, March 04, 2015 - 08:54 pm:

Couple things, George, yup, played all we are allowed off it right after I got it, played some of it again during my annual "Tribute to the Accordian" show, I think right after Whoopie Jofn Wilfart and again awhile back played a song from it as the closer.

Paul, if the place was so marginal that a $30 to $45 a month live music fee to ASCAP or BMI was going to put it out of business it must not have been doing much business. That's how songwriters & publishing companies get paid. From the perspective of a songwriter, it is pretty nice to go to the mailbox and get a check from the licensing agency I belong to, BMI (Broadcast Music International) for a song of mine that somebody recorded. ASCAP & BMI provide all sorts of services for the money that is collected. They do not actually keep track of the songs that are played in live performance in bars in most instances, they keep track of recordings and live performance songs that are performed for profit in a public venue such as a theater. That money - or at least part of it - goes to the administration and legal fund of each of those organizations. In Canada, SOCAN does the same administering of songs and rights and SESAC does the same for other writers and publishers. What much of that money is used for is this: A company uses a writer's song in their advertising. The publisher and artist know it was used but the company does not voluntarily pay the usage fees, knowing that the piddly little publishing house and the struggling writer do not have the assets or knowledge to bring suit to collect the royalties owed for their artistic property rights. ASCAP, BMI, etc., WILL take them on. At no cost to the publishing house or the songwriter. It is like belonging to one of those legal clubs where they will send a lawyer to represent you. They have millions of dollars and dozens of lawyers on staff protecting the creative rights of songwriters and publishers, no matter how unknown and obscure. BMI or ASCAP on the publishing line of a song lets the world know that the writer and publisher have the backing of those organizations. My publishing company is through BMI, HOWITIS MUS. They have sent me a few good checks over the years for songs other people have recorded.

For a little, pretty much unknown songwriter like me it is a nice thing to be able to say to somebody who wants to record a song, "I just charge the BMI minimum." My Yellowstone song has been recorded several times by people other than me; my Memories song was recorded by a guy in Texas which I would have never known about if BMI had not collected the fee and sent me the check. It has been recorded several other times but all those times I knew about it before the recording. The Texas one was fun, I spent the rights check on a plane ticket to Ft Worth, went to his CD release party, got to sing it with him and his band, got to be on the radio interview from Billy Bobs Texas and eat a big steak and drink a little whiskey courtesy of his promoter/manager, who was a fine looking Texas woman about half my age.

I have never understood the objection bars and restaurants have to paying for the music. They will run a $200 ad in the paper encouraging people to come listen to the music, pay a band hundreds of dollars to come and play but balk at paying the person who wrote the song a few cents per song.

That's like me coming to your house and eating the food out of your refrigerator -- food that you grew, canned or froze and prepared and not paying you for it. Somebody wrote those songs. They own them. They deserve to be paid for the performance of them by someone else, especially if the venue is making money by using the music as an enticement to bring in business. The fact that the songs are 75 or 100 years old has nothing to do with whether it is still in a publishing company catalog or not. Most likely it is. Just try recording "Silver Haired Daddy of Mine" and not paying the rights. It was Gene Autry's first hit in 1934 and is still in the catalog today. Many songs older than that still generate money for the writer and the publisher.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Thursday, March 05, 2015 - 05:30 pm:

Stan - I agree with everything you said until the last paragraph. Intellectual property of all sorts is worth protecting to encourage more people to create rather than just consume. We all are better off and I support it. I am glad you are getting checks for your work as you should.

Where I differ is over the issue of how long work should be protected. Can the creator of a 100 year old tune really benefit from royalties now? Some protection is needed and good for everybody but like so many things, it has been extended too far and has now become a chilling blanket in many cases.

In my own case, I can't say that the fees the restaurant had to pay for our 100 + year old music forced the owner out of business, but it was certainly an additional burden that added onto a load the man just couldn't carry. He lost his shirt, our band lost its gig, the public lost some good uplifting music that is hard to find being played live and ASCAP/BMI gets nothing further. That's lose, lose, lose, lose in my book by trying to ride a good thing too far.

Vintage Paul


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