Very OT: San Fernando Road, 1944

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Very OT: San Fernando Road, 1944
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 02:21 am:

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=883936681640053


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 04:13 am:

Thanks Steve. Interesting film and clever use of a railway running alongside the highway. I wonder how the lights were powered. I doubt if there was an electricity outlet in the railway carriage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 05:55 am:

Nice film :-) I wonder if there were any blackouts on the US west coast during WW2?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 09:22 am:

San Fernando Road was state route 99 then, and was the main n-s road through California. It went from Canada to the Mexican border, and made a right turn in Los Angeles. Interstate 5 is used now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 09:56 am:

Yes, come to think of it there was a blackout during the war. Going back and looking again, I think the film was shot before we got into the war. Bing's recording is from 1944, but the film is from before Pearl Harbor. All the cars are prewar.

My guess would be that the lights and camera were mounted on a flatcar.


San Fernando Road (US 99), Burbank, mid-fifties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson Absaroka County on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:08 am:

Steve,
Very Cool. Thanks.
My Mom work in a bank and my Dad worked in a machine shop on San Fernando Rd in Sun Valley. As a boy, I tried to find the pennies I put on those tracks after the train went by.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach & Big Bear on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:36 am:

That sounded more like Dean Martin than Bing Crosby. Yes we had blackouts in WWII. They would blow the air raid sirens and we had to pull the blackout curtains closed. The street lights were all painted blue on the side facing west. Car headlights were painted blue from the top to the middle. An A Card got you four gallons of gas a week. They tested the air raid sirens at noon on the last Friday of every month.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:57 am:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

My Mother was a Bing Crosby fan and had several of his records, that one being one of them. Hearing that song again is very nostalgic to me.

I remember as a kid, my family taking day trips to the "Valley". It seemed that Sepulveda Blvd and San Fernando road were always involved!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 02:13 pm:

I believe there were a lot of roads all across America at that time with interurban tracks laid beside the automobile roads, not everyone had a car but a lot of people traveled by streetcars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 03:03 pm:

The Friday noon air raid siren went off as I was reading Frank's post....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 09:56 pm:

I think that railroad track was Southern Pacific. It ran from Los Angeles to San Francisco.

My dad was in the Civil Defense Auxiliary Police during the war. He and other men drilled at football field at Glendale High School. One summer evening I was sitting in the stands with the rest of the family watching them drill. Afterward we stopped at the ice cream store to get a quart of ice cream and on the way home the air raid siren blew and we had to pull over and park with the lights off until the all clear sounded. So, we sat in the car using our hands to dip out the ice cream before it melted! :-).

As a kid, we just took things in stride. It was a memorable occasion.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson Absaroka County on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:17 pm:

Norm
I thought the tracks belonged to the Southern Pacific too. I saw mostly freight and some passenger trains passing through.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

Norm you and Kirk are correct. I have a recollection of being awakened by the Pullman porter as we were passing over those rails one morning in 1955. My family was on the S.P. Owl out of Oakland Ca. in a private Pullman observation car complements of the Southern Pacific RR. But that's another story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 11:19 am:

I learned a very valuable lesson on that railroad track. All the cross traffic has to cross that track. One day when I was working at a garage as a teen, the owner asked me to take a 1938 Ford to get some parts. I had to cross that track. I started out in low gear and as I crossed the track shifted into second. The shifting plate on that old Ford was worn and the transmission stuck in low and second at the same time and I couldn't move the shifter stick. The transmission locked up right on the tracks. Fortunately, a motorcycle policeman came up and he put his front wheel against my rear bumper and pushed me off the tracks. I don't know how the motorcycle was powerful enough to do that because his tire was pushing against my bumper and my rear wheels were sliding on the road, but he got me off the tracks avoiding what could have been a very serious accident. The lesson I learned was: Never shift gears when you are over a railroad track!
Norm


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