OT- amature writers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT- amature writers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Ragland , Pea Ridge Arkansas on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 10:32 am:

Hi forum friends,

I am looking for other forum members who are writers. My first hobby is writing. I love to write short stories, and I just finished my first Novel. It would be great to know other Model T friends who share the hobby of writing as well.

Greg Ragland


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 05:02 pm:

... amateur ...


Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 05:42 pm:

Greg, I have always enjoyed writing. It has always been a way for me to clearly express myself. However, I seem to have lost my ability to use correct punctuation and to differentiate the spellings and use of several words. I've always felt a great deal of pride in my ability to write my thoughts so much better than speaking them. But, as I've gotten older, the skill necessary to properly communicate has weakened and I'm growing more and more silent. I suppose this comes as a blessing to my family and friends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 07:54 pm:

I often write articles about our club events for our Dairyland Tin Lizzies newsletter "The Buzz".

Usually I'll show my name as author, but sometimes I don't use my name. Once I used the author name of "Henry Pford" on purpose in jest and someone criticized me saying I don't even know how to spell his name.

I recently did a story titled "The day Mr. Henry Ford Visited the Plymouth, Wisconsin Ford Dealership" This is what is called "Historical Fiction" because some of it is true and some is fiction. It's actually a spoof, done just for fun. All of the characters in the article (except Henry) are members of our club, and how they are portrayed in the article is what they do or did for their occupation, what they are interested in, or some aspect of their lives.

You can read it at: http://clubs.hemmings.com/dairylandtinlizzies/2015/buzz%20for%20web.pdf

I'm thinking about a sequel for this, but it's still a work in progress.

Before signing off, we must not overlook the great writers on our Forum: Stan Howe and Hurc. They are both great!

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 08:31 pm:

Uncle Stan calls "Herman and Freida" historical fiction. It's great reading, for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Friday, March 06, 2015 - 08:58 pm:

I was a couple of years ago working on a project with a fellow T'er in Gurley Alabama. We took a break for lunch and drove into "town" for a bite. On the way we passed the local strip club. On the portable sign out front letters had been stuck in the slots to say:

"ARMATURE NIGHT EVERY FRIDAY"

I offered to let Ron Patterson know but Bill thought it probably wasn't a starter or generator rebuild club meeting there once a week.

I still wonder...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Robinson Salty Bottom, AL on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 09:52 am:

Your memory is too good, Steve. I offered to let my wife apply for a part-time job there. She hits hard!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 11:41 am:

Thanks for the compliments.

IMHO, every person has at least a few good stories to tell. Some are more adept at putting them down on paper than others but like most other skills, it is a craft that can be improved if a person wants to improve their writing. It is also true for me that some of the best stories I have ever read are not grammatically correct, nor written according the the rules others like to impose on writers. Some of the worst I have ever read are grammatically correct and follow all the rules.

Over the years, I have written a lot of different articles, essays and a couple books as well as editing some things others have written. I don't have time to do much of that anymore but do still write some on Montana history, especially the homestead era in eastern Montana. That was the basis for Herman and Freida.

I used to write a lot on the forum but since the advent of the forum police scanning and screening virtually every post for errors and omissions I find what time I do have better spent in other places writing about other things.

This really doesn't have much to do with this post but here's a photo I took on a trip last fall from Havre through Warrick; across the Missouri River ferry north of Winnifred and on to Lewistown. Great drive. It would be a wonderful Model T tour except most people won't drive on a gravel road or get more than a couple miles from an ice cream stop and there aren't many on this route.

This is an original Montana homestead near Winnifred.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 11:58 am:

Looks like good tour country to me.


I consider this a perfect Model T road. (Sorry for the drift.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 01:08 pm:

Stan and Steve - Those are beautiful pictures. The Montana Homestead is a lot newer than a Sod House. It has a concrete floor, brick chimney, and that pipe sticking up at the right rear might be a plumbing vent meaning it has indoor plumbing. Also notice above the door and a little to the left are what appears to be electrical wires. Way in the back behind the windmill tower, it looks like an electrical pole & wires. This place may have been lived in until the 1950's, maybe later.

Steve - That two track trail is a nice one. I'm ready to go on a tour there as soon as the snow melts. Ya, it might be a little muddy, but it would be a nice drive.

My T's are drivers, meaning they can and do get dusty, dirty, even muddy sometimes. Not afraid to "ford" streams - helps to clean the mud off.

Looking forward to more tours.....

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 01:32 pm:

I write how-to articles for several genealogical societies for those people just getting into the Hobby. They are not really long and some are just a couple of how to do tips. I am now working on an article dealing with the short falls of using ancestry.com and their failures as I see them. For those who watch the program on TLC, which is called WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? That like all other TV shows are scripted, and usually take several months of easy research.
They nicely blend in a transition from one family to the next, until they get back to an ancestor
who fought in the RevW. With me when I got stuck
on my Nichols line I DNA tested, learned who the immigrant ancestor for this line is and am now trying to discover who the three generations I am missing.

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 01:54 pm:

Stan, Steve, .... guys after my own heart.

As the weather gets a little nicer, I will take the TT off the skates and start driving,
fussing with it. It is down those backwater "pikes" that the real world lives. I have
a real problem gettting my head around the organized tour and ice cream parlor logic.
Give me lonely draws and a soft breeze making the aspens quake, the smell of sage
and dust, and the sun making rusty metal give off that unique scent it does.

That is where I want to be and what I want to write about. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 02:13 pm:

There were very few sod houses in Montana during homestead days. Montana was homesteaded during and after the railroad boom from the 1880's to 1920's. The Milwaukee came to Montana in 1909 and was part of the last homestead boom in the state. They laid rails until about 1916 for branch lines. Lumber was readily available and cheap. Most homestead houses were frame construction, every lumber yard along the railroad sold a variety of kits for homestead shacks that could be built in just a day or two. They also sold kit houses for those with a bigger bankroll.

There were a lot of dugouts, which is a house dug into the side of a hill with either a sod or frame front facade and a roof of either poles and dirt or poles and boards. My stepfather was born in a sheep wagon and spent the first 4 years of his life in a dugout.

Here are two "kit" homestead shacks.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 07, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

Typical "family" kit house. Peaked roof, porch added later.



By the way, the house in the first photo was lived in until the mid 70's, the concrete footing was added later, the pipe sticking up is for a propane heater.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 10:10 pm:

I started writing a novel in high school. I was the only guy in a classroom of 13 women. Every girl in the class was a character in the novel.

The story took place in the county seat during the years 1912 to about 1916. Had to do with high finance, revenge, lust, killing, and a dream.

I consulted old newspapers and photographs from the period to describe the feel of my novel. Locations of businesses, street names and such, were the same, but major players of course were fictionalized.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 10:25 pm:

What a shame that the young people of today have no idea how their ancestors lived ...without ipads, video games, ear buds...to say nothing about lack of reliable electricity and indoor plumbing.

How great this Forum is that there are folks who share some memories of the "old days".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 11:29 pm:

I'm not so sure that is true of all young people. I have a great nephew that is planning to major in Military History in college and teach it at college level down the road. His favorite vacation is a visit to a battlefield.

The last house in the photos above is another on of those that busts the myth of the poor starving homesteader who should never have set foot in Montana let alone put a plow in the ground. This little house was the first homestead house on a place north of Galata, Montana. In two years they build a nice large house and the man who was living in this one donated it and two acres of land to the newly formed school district. They held school for a few years in it and then built a fine two room school for the students with a separate house for the teachers. This was then used as a store room. There are still signs of it being used as a school, two of the walls are painted green to be used as chalkboards.

I wrote a whole article about this for the Cowboy Poetry.com site a couple years ago. It has been featured there several times.

Here a a couple more photos but not the article.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 11:34 pm:

The white two room school set just off to the south of the flag pole you can see in the photo of the old house/school. It was moved several years ago to the Leonard Matteson farm along with the two homestead houses. Leonard has an extensive farm museum at his farm and the school houses and homestead houses were added to his museum and his protection of them. The plaque is on the white rock you can see in the photo above. If you look you can see one of the outhouses behind the school. There is also a barn for the horses some of the students would have ridden to school but it has mostly fallen down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 12:01 am:

I doubt there is much interest but if you want to see some of my other photography of Montana historical buildings you can visit www.cowboypoetry.com and open the "Picture the West" tab. You will have to scroll down to find my photos and articles but I think there are quite a few of them still searchable. You might also like to search the "https://www.facebook.com/cowboypoetryandmore" tab on facebook. At the moment I see they are using one of my photographs of the Cowboy Bar sign for their header. It is one of the most popular there and they have used it probably a dozen time since I sent it to them. You might also like my Warrick to Winnifred series of photos but I can't figure out how to post them.

Here are some links to some of my photographs and essays on Picture the West; I know there are more but it's "go play your fiddle for the first time in a month" so I'm off to the studio to practice -- Lord knows I need it.

http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk140.htm#sh
http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk134.htm#howe
http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk128.htm#howe4
http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk127.htm#howe

http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk112.htm#sh2

http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk112.htm#sh2

http://www.cowboypoetry.com/photowk5.htm#sh


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 01:43 am:

The plaque caught my eye. Another Montana resident had the same middle name. Can anybody ID that famous person?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 11:42 am:

John Wayne?


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