Black Paint or What?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Black Paint or What?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 07:10 pm:

What the heck is that black finish Henry put on his cars? I have what I believe is an original '24'25 splash guard that needs redone. It is solid with a few surface rust spots and some flaking paint. I want to strip it down and repaint it but when I applied some paint remover nothing happened. No reaction to the remover at all. What gives?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 07:16 pm:

It's closer to asphalt than modern paints, the main ingredient is called Gilsonite. When oven baked like on most sheet metal parts without wooden components, it's very durable. Try careful bead blasting :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 07:23 pm:

Roger, you are right, it takes it right off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 07:25 pm:

Gary,

When I stripped down my '22 Coupe for painting I used an aircraft paint stripper I bought at the auto store. I applied it with a brush and let it sit, scraped it off with a putty knife and had to reapply it. It is harsh stuff so be sure to wear heavy duty gloves. Thin plastic gloves melt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 07:25 pm:

I've always used lacquer thinner and it seems to take the paint right off real quick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

Thanks guys. My blast cabinet is a bit small for the splash aprons (not guards) so I'll try the aircraft paint stripper and/or the lacquer thinner. The stuff I tried was good for a wide variety of coatings but evidently not enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Kramer on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Gary,
When I had a problem trying to remove old paint from car parts,one of our older car club members told me rough up the painted surface with some sandpaper.He said this would allow the paint stripper to penetrate the old paint & make the job easier.It worked for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, March 08, 2015 - 09:19 pm:

Use Aircraft Stripper outside. It's an excellent stripper and fumes are ferocious but I doubt it was ever used on an aircraft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 03:03 am:

There is such a thing as Aircraft stripper. Aircraft especially modern commercial ones need the best paint possible on them to make the need to repaint unnecessary for years. You can imagine how long it takes to strip paint off one and time is real money in the aircraft industry.

The paint used is the top quality Polyurethane 2 part enamels. They are rock hard and difficult to scratch or strip. The stripper used on them has to be far stronger than normal types.

As the Model T has a baked enamel which also has had nearly 100 years to dry it is hard also.

Above comments are good, roughen with coarse abrasive paper, apply the stripper in a thick coating so there is plenty to soak in and not just disappear into the paint coating.

Once coated it will work better if you cover it with plastic sheets/bags or even paper this will prevent the stripper drying out and last of all leave it to work at least half an hour, by all means check it occasionally but let it work. If you are too impatient it will be only partly softened and you will have to apply more or spend lots of energy digging at the paint.

Then you will have to use more product which will cost you more money.

While on Aircraft stripper, I used to teach students auto painting, one of the first exercises for them was to strip a panel which they then proceeded to repaint from the bare metal.

When the 2 part Polyurethanes came out in the 1970's we were advised to use the Aircraft strength stripper ( works faster/ better /use less material). It is so strong it came in specially lined tins, we quickly found out how good it was. One tiny speck on bare skin and one thought you had been stabbed with a red hot poker.

Even though the students worked with protective clothing, goggles, gloves and masks they still found a way to get stripper on them. The last straw came when some of the smarter students decided to get a tiny speck of the stripper and place it on the back of the ear of an unsuspecting class mate.

This resulted in the student racing around the shop screaming as he looked for a tap to dunk his head under to neutralize the stripper. We went back to auto strength and put up with the poor performance of it. Gradually strippers improved and we ended up with ones that worked well enough but didn't have students in agony if they came in contact with the stripper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 06:41 am:

There are enough good vendors mentioned on this forum, why even mess with a problematic one. I purchased four sets of coils from Ron Paterson three years ago and they have been trouble-free. So trouble free in fact, on my 14, I was getting water in the coil box during heavy rains. I ended up sealing the coil box cover with strip caulk. I did this two years ago, and haven't had to take the cover off since. I just ordered a starter from Ron. Mentioned how good the coils have been performing, his response was "it was possible for the points to get out of alignment and if I ever have a problem to send them back". I purchased parts from Glen Chaffin, excellent service from him as well. Of course everyone knows Langs customer service..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 01:00 pm:

Ted,

"... I doubt it was ever used on an aircraft."

If you read the can carefully, you'll find that it warns not to use it on aircraft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

Dan, Don't you just hate it when......?


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