Simplex Spinning Auto Lock

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Simplex Spinning Auto Lock
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 11:42 am:

This lock has been in my possession on the shelf for over 40 years and I am now attempting to learn more about it. I have Googled it but to no avail. All I know is that it attached to the steering column as a lock to prevent theft of the vehicle. I assume it is for a Model T as the box states "For Fords" and that is what Model Ts were originally called because there were no other models at the time. Two screws were missing, thus the shiny new flat heads. I am hoping someone with lots of Ford knowledge and experience will recognize it.
Thanks - Ron

For some reason I am unable to upload photos at this time and will attempt an update soon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 11:50 am:

Box
Top
Bottom
Serial #
Instructions


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 02:39 pm:

It looks virtually identical to the lock discussed on this older post:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/87948.html?1239903499


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 03:32 pm:

Hmm, might be no connection but there was also a Simplex player piano mechanism manufacturer--one of my players has one.
David D


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 07:29 pm:

David, The Simplex Player Company was in Worcester, Mass. not Chicago. You'll find the name Simplex on a lot of different products (including time clocks), but they have nothing to do with each other.

The Simplex Player action is my favorite to work on, they're less over thought than the Aeolian Standard Actions and require a lot less servicing too. They're easy to repair and are damn near bullet proof when it comes to their valving. The trapezoidal tracker bar I think works far better than the standards bar and tracks better too.

Sorry to go off topic, but David touched on one of my favorite things besides the Model T and I had to say something about the Simplex. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, March 09, 2015 - 07:44 pm:

Here's the photos down sized for easier viewing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 12:47 am:

Martin,
Thanks for the follow-up; I've been busy recovering pump bellows today, and watching a brush cuttings fire, so didn't even waltz over to my piano to check where it was made.
I agree, the Simplex player is very reliable and very well-thought out--and the fishing pole tracker system is pretty fool-proof until the string breaks!
Even Gulbransen finally followed Simplex's design (except for the tracker-bar, which I also think works wonderfully).
Sorry guys, we're getting way off subject now!
Yes, the Simplex name seems to be used on a lot of stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 12:54 am:

Jay,
I can't figure out how it works--are you missing the steering wheel shaft that goes with it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Vagasky,Tucson on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 08:16 pm:

David, as you turn the key, you will notice that the brass slide will move, exposing a more round hole. When the device is installed, the steering wheel can be pulled up, and then the key is turned allowing the brass plate to slide closed and now the steering wheel will just spin. It works the same as a LeLand Lock. I will have several of them at Chickasha FQ 50-51-52.
Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 02:19 am:

Don,
Ahhh, ok, now I see that. neat idea! That part just never occurred to me!
There were some pretty clever folks back then!
:-)
Thanks!
David D.
PS Hey Martin, we's gotta talk Player Pianos sometime!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 02:38 am:

David, definitely! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 03:10 am:

OT
David, since you're a fellow piano tuner/tech, ever see one of these? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 07:45 am:

David Dewey,I sent you a PM about players.

Marty


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 01:42 pm:

Martin,
NO! Is it a hammer boring jig?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 03:40 pm:

I thought it was the Murphy Rod that sets the peddle bearings on a player piano.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 04:51 am:

David, yep but it does a few more things than the hammer and butt drilling jigs do today, it'll also bore catchers, cut shanks and it's also good for reaming out a broken shank.



Looking from the top down into the base it has a "V" channel for holding a shank, you scribe it (the threaded piece with the point on the vertical shaft) the shank, then use the cutter or can lay the shank in the anvil channel on told of the body and cut it with the cutter also.
It's called a Journeyman's Friend or Helper (at least that's what we used to call them) and is a real multipurpose tool. Works well on grands (concert and square), uprights and even harpsichords. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 06:51 pm:

Martin,
that is too cool, When I find my 1920s Tuner's Supply catalogs, I'll have to look through them to see if it's in there. Looks a lot better than what they sell today!
David


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