My 1918 center door in 1958-60

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: My 1918 center door in 1958-60
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Hedges on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 10:11 am:

After 2 years of reserch I tracked down a family member of the last known owner of my center door.The lady is the Daughter of the lady in the picture,she told me it was taken around 1958-60,this is when they bought the car.

application/pdf
191858.pdf (108.0 k)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 10:15 am:

Nice, Here it is:

58 sedan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Hedges on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 10:17 am:

Thanks Roger I scaned it to pdf and couldnt convert it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 10:21 am:

I just snipped the pdf with the snipping tool :-)
I saw the Centerdoor still looks very nice in your profile photo - did you have to rerestore it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Hedges on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 10:32 am:

Roger its not been restored,the lady in the pic passed away in 1991 then the car was sold to the gentleman I bought it from ,he didnt do anything to it ,it set in a shed until I got it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 11:22 am:

The car had been redone before the picture was taken, as evidenced by the wood around the windows. Someone stripped the paint from those areas and varnished it as part of the "restoration."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 12:03 pm:

It has a typical 1950s cosmetic restoration.

They started with good unrestored cars back then because there were plenty available. Gave them a paint job, replaced the upholstery only if absolutely necessary and then fixed or restored mechanical items only as needed. Example - motors were overhauled (ring job, valve job, tighten bearings) but not necessarily totally rebuilt.

They didn't wrestle or bother with the junk piles like people do today because it wasn't worth the time or effort when much better cars were available. My dad could tell you stories of original antique cars that people passed up 65 years ago because they weren't considered worth the effort that would be considered very desirable today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 12:12 pm:

LIKE !!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 07:27 pm:

Looks like an Arkansas razorback plate on the front. So, it has been "in the neighborhood", so to speak, for a long time?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:11 pm:

Go Hogs!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:35 pm:

Jack,

I'm glad you found some additional information about your car. It is always nice to make new discoveries that are helpful.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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