Stipe 280 camshaft

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Stipe 280 camshaft
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Messenger on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 01:28 pm:

I am looking to buy a stipe 280 camshaft


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

Good choice


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 03:42 pm:

http://www.stipemachine.com

I've bought all of mine direct and found the folks at Specialty Motor Cam to be very friendly and helpful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 04:42 pm:

Great product! I am very pleased with it in my '26. If you are going to spend all that money for a quality rebuild, the Stipe 280 is sure the way to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 07:36 pm:

Having Joe Bell rebuild my '12, and he says I'll be happy with it, so told him to go for it!! Can't wait to get ol' "Pete" back in action!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 08:07 pm:

I have bought a dozen or more in the last 3 years, happier each time I purchase a Stipe Cam. Can't do any better. JP


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 08:12 pm:

Can someone please post a close up photo of a 280 cam, I tried Stipes web site but anything after History wont open for me. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 08:35 pm:

I spoke to Ed Messenger today. He said he has called Specialty Cam and left messages and they've not returned his phone call. He wants to buy a 280 from one of our Forum Friends. Any out there for sale?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:11 pm:

I thought I heard that Bill had retired??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

I used one in 2013 for a friend's car. He likes the way it runs. I also used one in my car in 2014 and it also runs very well.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

I hope that's not the case. I was planning to buy another .280 cam later this spring. But, if the Stipe .280 cams are no longer available, the Chaffin's .280 cams aren't much of a step down. The one I put in my late father's '22 Coupe performs every bit as well as the Stipe, it's only the fit and finish that makes it second fiddle in my book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 10:19 pm:

i heard bill retired also, but his employees bought the business, which was much more than just making cams, not sure if they will make cams or not, just rumor, not hard facts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 09:21 am:

Do remember the 280 cam from Chaffin has the 7 and 1/2 degree advance already in the cam so just use a standard cam gear not one with the advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 07:42 pm:

Eric, Stipe makes a very good cam but I believe that ours are every bit as good and a little less money. We have the specs if interested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 09:58 am:

Bill Stipe announced he was quitting and retiring back in July of last year. The shop is still filling back orders for some things like Model A shocks but I don't think any more Stipe cams will ever be made.

You can call Bill and talk to him or his son Tony 920-467-2895 but if you want a good cam you probably just need to buy one from Glen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Seager on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:51 am:

Langs and Snyders both still show the stipe cam in there catalogue. You might try them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 07:58 pm:

John, Yes our cams are already advanced to the optimum point. If you advance the Stipe cam 7.5 deg. you will definitely improve it and it will perform almost as good as ours..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Messenger on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 11:56 am:

I have an email dated 3-16-15 from "Stipe Machine Co" that reads: "we are completely out of 280 cams and are looking at a couple of months out yet".
I also talked to Dave at Chaffins and ordered a 280 camshaft which he shipped immediately.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

Please forgive my ignorance, but I've heard repeatedly how great a 280 cam is on this forum. How is a 280 cam better than a stock cam and why?

1. Different timing?
2. Different lift?
3. Different duration?
4. Different something else?

Also, what does "better" mean?

1. More horsepower?
2. More torque?
3. Different sound?
4. Different something else?

I guess my other question is what does "280" indicate?

Thanks!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jahn Wright - Rio Rancho NM on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

Stipe cams are still in production. See this link to Bill Stipe's recent post: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/528033.html?1427330536


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

Henry, the "280" refers to the amount of lift, or difference in measurement between the narrow and tall (lobe height)Which for this cam is 0.280 inch. The higher lift increases valve open duration resulting in more flow that the stock 0.250 inch lift. Also a stock cam that has many miles will be worn. It turned out the original (I think) cam in my T only had a lift of 0.245 when we checked it. Greater flow can increase efficiency if done correctly. Also the Stipe 280 seems to have even more benefit in conjunction with a 7.5 degree advance cam gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 02:22 pm:

Thanks John. I appreciate your response.

A couple of follow-up questions asked in ignorance:

1. I get the idea and effect of the higher lift, but in my untrained mind that does not necessarily also mean longer duration. Does the 280 also have a longer duration?

2. I'm baffled by the notion of the 7.5 degree advance cam gear and its advantage. Isn't timing advance just a function of timer setting? How does an advance cam gear produce different results from just setting the timing 7.5 degrees advanced?

I don't mean to sound doubtful of what has been learned the hard way over many years. I'm just trying to understand it.

Thanks!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 04:50 pm:

John,
I can't agree with your statement "The higher lift increases valve open duration". In most cases and under the limitations of a particular engine design, this is probably true, but what the performance seekers are looking for, is area under the curve. Ideally, from their point of view, would be a rectangular lift curve, however, physics stand in the way. Valve velocity is limited by the diameter of the cam follower, and to approach a lift curve with sharp corners, acceleration, hence jerk, would climb out of sight and impose impossible loads into the system.
So, given the limitations, you are mostly correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

Henry, the cam advance changes when the valves open and close. You would still set the timer to 15 degrees after TDC (based on crank location, not cam) for full retard timing.

Roar, Henry, to lift the valve higher at the same RPM does take longer as the valve stem is still moving at the same speed, just further. Any time the valve isn't closed, it is open (even though it isn't fully open but for a short period) and flow is happening. Granted the duration isn't vastly increased, but it does increase.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 07:20 pm:

John,
May be the limitations of the components in a T engine, tappet face diameter in particular, are such that valve velocity can not be increased. I just don't know the details, but in general, if you increase acceleration, and thereby velocity, you can achieve higher lift within the same duration. At least that is how I see it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 09:04 am:

Roar, you may have a good point on duration. However the increased valve opening will increase flow. With greater flow, you should have better efficiency.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 08:43 pm:

Duration is not increased when you advance a cam. increased duration improves the high end performance. Duration can be increased by reducing the valve clearance. Advancing the cam increases the low end performance. The Stipe cam performs well without advance but can be improved if you advance it 7,5 deg. Our cam are already advanced to the optimum point. further advance will hurt their performance. So just run them as designed. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 11:22 pm:

For what its worth I installed a 280 cam in my car equipped with a Waukesha head and rebuilt engine. I didn't like it. It performed better at higher rpm but suffered at start off. I sold it off on eBay and installed a 250 cam. Much better. Frankly I don't understand what all the hype is over the 280.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 10:49 am:

We live in a "more is better" world, Richard. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

Richard, You could have improved the cam performance by simply advancing it 7.5 deg. That would have given it more low end torque.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:56 pm:

So Glen, If I advance my Stipe 250 will it affect top end performance? I've heard that if you advance to gain low end you have to give up top end.

You know here in SoCal with our freeway driving top end is most important.

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

Gene, I'm offering you a free Montana 500 speed secret.:-) Model T's are ALL low end.

*disclaimer* all blanket statements (including this one) are false. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer in Troy, New York on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 09:46 am:

I didn't read every post carefully, but it should be explained that there's two kinds of timing in an engine --- spark timing and valve timing.

Spark timing is obvious --- done with the hand levers, retard or advance. Valve timing is done by setting the camshaft so that it opens/closes valves at a certain point in the cycle. Most cars have a cam gear with a vernier-type adjustment which allows the factory or the rebuilder to choose valve timing. I can't recall how to do this on a "T" . . .

The reason why valve timing is important is due to the mass or inertia of the gases. For more power/performance at low rpm you want the valve timing to be early, for more power/performance at high rpm you want the valve timing to be late. But as the crossover point in the chart shows, this too depends on where your driving is to be. Whatever the case, a rebuilder sets up an engine depending on how the owner wants to drive the car. So with these Stipe 280 cams (and other variants) it all depends on what kind of driving you want to do in choosing the cam and how you adjust the cam timing.

This chart is from a Franklin of the 1920's, but applies in general to all engines.

Cam Timing Chart

I'm not an expert, I only play one on the internet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 06:42 pm:

Gene, Yes, If you improve the low end you will give up a little on the high end. We overcame this problem by changing the lobe separation angle from 115.5 deg to 110 deg. So we now have both a good low end and high end. You cannot do this with the Stipe cam as it is fixed at 115.5 deg. sorry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 06:48 pm:

Thanks Glen, That's exactly what I wanted to know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 07:00 pm:

I wonder if anyone has given thought to reproducing the early T camshafts. The intake lobe height was different from the exhaust. I had one on a 1910 I owned previously and it had significant power in the lower range. It began to flatten out about 32 mph with the heavy flat top cast iron pistons, but it could climb hills in high gear with a full deck of passengers where other cars would have to use low. Its possible, even probable, the timing gears were different too. That was some car. Last I heard, Brian Ostergren owned it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 08:16 pm:

Richard, You are right, the 09-12 cams were different. The intakes had 0.205 lift and the exhausts had 0.265 lift. the intake duration was 205 deg and the exhaust duration was 228 deg. intake opened at 17 deg ATDC and closed at 42 deg ABDC. Exhaust opened at 42 deg BBDC and closed at 6 deg ATDC. However, performance was not that great. They did perform well at low speed but had a poor high end. So there would be no reason to reproduce that cam for todays driving. Our 280 cam has virtually the same low end as that cam but a much better high end. so you get the best of both worlds.We believe that our cam has been optomized for todays driving and you can pull most hills in high gear and drive faster than it is safe in a Model T.


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