I'm not drivng this car again...

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: I'm not drivng this car again...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:16 pm:

...until I put some better front wheels on it.


If you look carefully you can see open space between the rim and the felloe. There's a lot more than I was able to show in the picture.


This one has the same kind of open space...


...and lots of rusty dust. Fortunately I have a couple of pretty good square-felloe wheels to use until these are fixed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:30 pm:

Stutzmann's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:31 pm:

Steve,

I think that is a good idea. As a teenager, I would not have let that worried me -- we were "bullet proof" back then.

Note if all the wood is still structurally sound, I have read where you might be able to remove the rim. Glue a thin veneer piece all the way around the outside of the wooden felloe. Heat the rim up to expand it -- an old oven heating element on the rim can do that as well as a charcoal grill etc. And then put it on and let it contract on the wooden felloe. Of course the safer thing to do would be to send them off the Stuzmann's etc. And if you are going to do that recommend you check and make sure you have the correct hubs for a 1915 since one of your goals is to work at putting more and more of the period correct pieces back on the car. Of course you could also just go with the demountable 30 x 3 clinchers. They make changing the tire easier if you ever have a flat. And they would have been a logical upgrade to a 1915 when they became available.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:46 pm:

alot of times even when the wood looks good, what about those 100 year old rivets that hold the fellow to the rim? we all know what a rusty nail can look like out of a very old board, and when there's nothing holding the fellow to the rim you are in trouble


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

Looks like one of those rivets has already worked its way out at least a half inch in that first pic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, March 13, 2015 - 10:36 pm:

The rivets are not what holds the rim on the felloe to the rim.

It is the pressure of the rim against the felloe that keeps the felloe on the rim.

Hypothetically, if the rim is tight against the felloe, you should be able to run the wheels without the rivets.

In my opinion, the rivets main purpose assist the felloe in staying centered on the rim. Rivets become loose and eventually let go when the rim is no longer tight against the felloe because the wood has shrunk. It is not a case of the rim eventually becomes loose because the rivets have become loose. See the logic here? The rim becomes loose before the rivets come loose, not the rivets become loose before the rim comes loose.

My dad and I tightened up a good set of wheels by tacking wood veneer around the circumference of the felloes and then heating the rims and reinstalling them and then as they cool they shrink to a tight fit.

The above only works with very good, sound wood. There is also other prep work that needs to be done such as sandblasting the rim to clean up the inner circumference.

This method has been discussed many times on the forum.

Many people have done this my neck of the woods over the last 50 or 60 years. Some have used veneer, others have used sheet metal.

So far, we have not had any problems with this method-

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 12:04 am:

One on my T was done well before my time and still good as new, a steel band at least an 1/8" thick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 12:40 am:

Erik - Please don't take this as sarcasm, because I don't mean any sarcasm at all. But your post on this thread is a really good example of why there was recent discussion on the forum about the merits of showing your location with your name, or at least on your profile,.....if only in very general terms if you'd prefer.

Your one sentence where you said,...."Many people have done this in my neck of the woods......"

Being curious as to where "your neck of the woods" is, I brought up your profile by clicking on your name, and your location is not shown there either. Not that it's important, but just a typical example of a case where it would have been nice to know what part of the country you're talking about.

Again, it really is nice to know at least if you're talking humid Florida, or dry Arizona, or somewhere in between,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 01:00 am:

Minnesota - where wood wheels shrink in the winter and expand in the summer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 01:41 am:

Kwik poly them fill this cracks and sel the wood with wood resin and the rerivit them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza, north adams ma on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 05:46 am:

You wouldn't put a band aid on a broken bone sticking through the skin! It's your life, but this is my two cents. http://www.woodwheels.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza, north adams ma on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 05:50 am:

I would not use a band aid to save my life! Just my two cents because I like you Steve! http://www.woodwheels.com/ They built four wheels for me and they are beautiful!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza, north adams ma on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 05:51 am:

damn why did that not show the first time?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 07:30 pm:

There are several ways to fix wheels some good some bad. After the terrible accident a couple of years ago on the national tour, due to wheel failure, I vote for new spokes, fellows and properly restored wheels.

I just took all 4 wheels off of my 1912 barn fresh car and sent them to Mel's in Ohio for all new wood spokes and fellows.

I too had the same air gaps as shown in Steve's photos. When I disassembled the wheels there were thin copper strips tacked to the fellows. So sometime in the past these wheels had been "fixed".

When I did take the wheels apart I found a great amount of wear in the fellow nipple and the holes in the fellows. So I must conclude the wear and tear of driving loose fitting wheels spokes and fellows will cause this wear and quite obviously weaken the integrity of the wheel.

To me the answer is quite simple take your wheels apart send the rims and hubs to Mel and have them properly restored for your safely and others that may ride with you.

Steve, Mel will be in Chickasha for the swap meet, and he can take your wheel parts back for proper restoration and you will only have to pay shipping one way. I have used him to restore wheels for my Waverly Electric, my 1909 Stoddard Dayton, with excellent results and quite reasonable prices. As I stated earlier he now has my 1912 T wheels. I'm not financially connected with Mel just a very satisfied and pleased customer several times over.

And Steve by the way, I enjoy reading your blogs and wish you to continue writing so fix those damn wheels the right way so I can continue reading about your exploits.

just sayin'
brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 07:52 pm:

BCG -- When you say "Mel in Ohio" I assume you're referring to Melvin Stutzman. Do you know where their space(s) will be at Chickasha?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 09:02 pm:

Mike,
Are Mel of Mel's Leather and Horsehair and Melvin Stuztman one in the same? If so, is Noah Stuztman the guy that does the wheels for Mel's Leather?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 09:12 pm:

Erik,
Did I ever tell you that my grandfather used to drive the streetcar in the background of your photo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 09:14 pm:

Mel Draper of Mel's leather sends wheels to Stutzman for rebuilding. You can send the wheels directly and save money Steve.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

Eric:

Grandpa lived in Duluth?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 11:39 pm:

Unless you want the satisfaction of doing it yourself, the easy and reasonably priced way to solve this problem is to send your wheels to Stutzman's for a rebuild with fresh hickory. -He does beautiful work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 09:09 am:

Steve has previously re-spoked his metal felloe wheels himself:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKZ7WrfHdf8

Steve, will you be attempting the rebuild of your wood felloe wheels yourself as well?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:17 am:

I think not. Choose your battles. I have more other stuff to do than I have time for, so this will go to somebody who knows what he's doing.


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