Old Photo - Rolling Mill - Rouge Steel Plant

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Rolling Mill - Rouge Steel Plant
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 10:31 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:21 am:

Yet another neat picture. I don't know why, but it never ceases to amaze me of the technology & equipment produced "from nothing" that put this country in the forefront of manufacturing so long ago, and so quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:40 am:

When the first steel mill opened, where did they get the steel to build it? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:49 am:

Clay crucible, iron ore, limestone, and charcoal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leck - Ohio on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 10:56 am:

Tim, I share your fascination with the suddenness and scope of the Machine Age. It is mind boggling to consider how it all came about and the change in mankind it rendered, would something like it ever happen again?

I like the chalkboard. No men working, had the plant not started yet?

Thanks Jay for sharing the photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 11:06 am:

Too clean: Must have been brand new.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 11:14 am:

https://youtu.be/ABcckOTVqao


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 02:20 pm:

That picture is likely showing tooling used to build Model A Fords. The Rouge plant built Model T engines, never complete Model T's.

The technology Ford used did not come out of nowhere. It was refined from ideas in use at other manufacturing facilities all over the world. The tooling at the Rouge was evolutionary from tooling seen at Highland Park, at Keim Mills, and Dodge Brothers, as well as plants that were visited in Europe and Great Britain by John Wandersee, Charles Sorensen, and other Ford management and engineering folks.

What made the USA dominant as a manufacturing power in the years after WWI? It was a combination of low taxes, cheap labor, cheap raw materials, and large corporations risking their future by investing heavily in our country.

When several of the necessary components are missing the factory closes and production moves to other countries.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 02:40 pm:

Where did the steel come from ? In raw form, "Duluth" would be the answer.
There is a reason they call that area "The Iron Range". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 05:13 pm:

Actually as much or maybe more of it came out of Superior, WI loading docks from the Iron Range. I can remember going through there as a kid back it he 60's when the docks were still working full tilt and there was a rust red dust on pretty much everything. Now there's only two ore docks left shipping taconite out of the harbor: one in Duluth, and the other in Allouez on the south side of Superior. Silver Bay and Two Harbors have docks that have replaced the old ones shipping in the Twin Ports.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, March 15, 2015 - 06:28 pm:

Michigan's Iron Ranges were the initial major producers of iron ore till the mines got too deep or the quality of the ore made them inefficient. However, many continued production into the 1960 and 70s. Marquette and Escanaba were major Michigan ports for shipping the ore to the smelters in Ohio and Indiana.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration