1920 assembly line-Photo, adapting hardware to the line

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1920 assembly line-Photo, adapting hardware to the line
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, March 16, 2015 - 10:31 pm:



The bearing on the floor that is holding the shaft driving the assembly line looks for all the world like an upside down line shaft. Like the ones most commonly seen hanging from the ceiling in an old shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Monday, March 16, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

Funny how the cars near the front don't yet have fenders, running boards or even hubcaps. I wonder if this is a factory publicity effort. That one Touring car seems to have the Ford name on the rad shell highlighted to make it more visible. Also, drivers door, removable wheel lugs and passenger side licence plate bracket. Must be a Canadian plant.

(Message edited by 404 not found on March 16, 2015)

(Message edited by 404 not found on March 16, 2015)

(Message edited by 404 not found on March 16, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Monday, March 16, 2015 - 10:49 pm:

Wouldn't it later than 1920? radiator skirt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 16, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

I wonder if the reason the two touring cars don't have fenders and the closed car (I can't tell what it is) does could be a different assembly sequence was needed for open vs. closed cars? Does seem odd.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, March 16, 2015 - 11:39 pm:

Canadian windshield also.
Definitely '24/'25 type high radiator though.
Great photo! Thanks Herb and all!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 07:42 am:

Things go wrong on an assembly line that they don't shut it down for. The fender guy could have been out of fenders (Or bolts or whatever) for a few cars and they continued with the process until the car could be 'reworked'. We used to do this all the time with lawn mowers when I worked for the orange lawn mower company. The problem would be marked with a piece of tape and the unit pulled from the line for rework before being boxed up. I'm sure the same thing happened and happens on automotive lines. There's probably even some loops in the system where rejects can be pulled to the side to fix and then put back in the line to complete their journey.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 08:35 am:

Its a lot worse than fenders, those front cars have no splash shields on them. They go under the body!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 08:41 am:

Great photo Herb.

Yes, Canadian 1924-1925 model year cars.

The fenders may also have been left off of the touring if the car was destined for shipping by rail within Canada. In the USA from at least 1915 until sometime later, they left the fenders off when they were going to place the T in a box car for rail shipment. The body was also only placed on the chassis for easy movement to the rail road loading area. From memory -- for USA shipping of 1926ish Coupes -- I believe there is a photo where Ford apparently left the body and fenders on the car and placed it at an angle in the box car.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman Miller on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 09:18 am:

Are there two motors driving that shaft?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 09:46 am:

Probably not as it looks if only to me like a gear reducer.It also looks like a variable speed drive on top.It also looks like the conveyor drive underneath probably at the end of that line unless there is more than one drive? I can't read the name on the variable speed but it would be cool if it was a Revees!!!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 10:38 am:

That's actually a very eerie picture. It gives me the shivers.

It's clearly the middle of the day, what with the sun shining in the roof windows.

Where are all the workmen??

Ford assembly lines normally look like kicked-over anthills! People everywhere! How'd they do that??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 12:16 pm:

Bud, in the early 1970's I worked for the company that acquired the Reeves Pulley Co. I am not sure that is the Reeves logo. But it does look like a block belt drive. In the 20's variable speed was usually used to vary the speed of a fixed speed line shaft. since line shaft speeds were relatively slow, the block belt was a good choice since it could transmit very high torques with remarkable accuracy. In the 70's and 80's I visited many plants where the Reeves drives were still very much in use. The block belt itself was a leather belt with wooden (beech) blocks bolted to it. leather pads tacked and glued to the block ends provided the friction material which ran against the variable pitch sheaves. Quite a remarkable and successful device invented my Milton O. Reeves! His Sextoauto and Octoauto were two of his more stunning marketing failures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Back in the day that type of roof/windows was called a Sawtooth and were laid out for sunlight.John,Yup as a Millwright for GM i worked on a few Reeves drives until i retired in 1996.My reference to the six wheeler in Rob's post was to the Sextoauto which i could not remember how to spell!! The vari drive is either fast or slow but the belt looks strange?? The linkage/speed adjust sure looks Reeves!!!!! Where is the time study man with the stop watch and clip board?? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


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