OT - Fords used by men with disabilities

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT - Fords used by men with disabilities
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

I believe there was a thread about another T used by a disabled driver earlier. A few more examples.

1910, a man who lost both arms drives a Model T:


November, 1908, paralyzed from the waist down, uses a Ford Model S. between August and November he says he has driven over 4,000 miles:



March, 1908. Not disabled, but the "Wonder Worker in Thought World," Prof. Bischoff, a clairvoyant, drives a Model K blindfolded through Wichita KS. He was tracing the route of another car to find a hidden article:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 11:05 pm:

I'd much prefer to be in front of either of the disabled guys than the blindfolded clairvoyant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 06:24 am:

Now the handicap for drivers are cell phones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 08:25 am:

I don't have a cell phone as i'm clairvoyant!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 09:04 am:

Gil and Bud,
We could try this at The Old Car Festival this year. Since Bud is clairvoyant, he gets to drive the K. Gil, you get to be the pedestrian..... :-)

Denny,
How true.....

The Professor gave several "exhibitions" during his stay in different Nebraska and Kansas towns and cities. On a later trip to Ottawa Kansas, the account says he drove 60 mph during one of the exhibitions with the Model K at Wichita. It also says "But high speed was impossible with the machine used today." Must have been a Maxwell (Eric Hylen, are you reading this? :-) ):


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 01:55 pm:

No thank's Rob!! Nope,i was lucky enough to get a ride i would not ride again in hope of someone else getting a chance to ride!! Yup,some things i see but my spelling is like driving blind!! Good on ya and hope to see everyone in Sept at TOCF!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.Mr Ford also had work for some handicaped?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 03:31 pm:

Every year we have a "horseless rodeo" at the fair grounds during the county fair. One of the events is blindfolded driver. The passenger tells the driver which way to turn and how fast to go etc. We have to drive a zig zag course without knocking over cones. I can tell you from experience, that I can't tell whether I am going right or left or straight ahead. And when stopped, I feel like I am still moving.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley L Brown Drury, MA on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 08:01 pm:

Watched the Roosevelt Special on PBS awhile back and FDR rigged up a T so he could drive went he was in Georgia.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Friday, March 20, 2015 - 08:17 pm:

Bud, I know you could do it....(Gil may not be as confident).

Norman, I think a Ford with the planetary transmission would be a "natural." You can rock back and forth easily without the problems of a straight geared transmission.

Stanley, I remember reading that he had a T that he could operate. Predecessor to the automatic......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 05:00 pm:

Don Crader of near Canton, Tx , now deceased built a hand controlled Model T. I recently found out there were no plans drawn, he simply drilled holes in the pedals and attached cables which ran over pulleys to a system of hand levers. Another unique device was a folding chair which was suspended from the car. Don would fold down the seat, slip into it off his wheelchair, then roll his wheelchair onto the back of the Model T. He would the slide around the length of the car to the front and slip into the drivers seat. Reaching over he would fold up the transport seat and was ready to go. A friend of Don's built the transport seat mechanism.

I will try to find out more details and will post them when I do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 05:13 pm:

.... "men with disabilities" ....

Would this include the "mental illness" we T owners all seem to have ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 08:59 pm:

What mental illness is that? Chevrophobia?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Saturday, March 21, 2015 - 10:50 pm:

Although I didn't see him do it, I know my dad, who was severely handicapped from polio as a toddler, drove Ts. He was unable to move his legs from one pedal to another, so he drove "modern" cars with a hand throttle and a devise welded to the clutch pedal, that kept his foot from falling off. His last car, a 1974 Superbeetle, (which I still have) he bought with the "Autostick", thus eliminating the clutch pedal.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration