Removing Aged/hardened tires?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Removing Aged/hardened tires?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

I recently acquired a 1923 Tourer, with 4 very old and very hard tires. What is the best way to remove them from the rims? I was thinking "sawsall" Any suggestions will be appreciated.
Thank you-Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:26 pm:

I don't know the best way to remove them, but I'd probably not use a saws all. I'd be afraid I'd damage the rim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

A saws all might be Ok. Just stop before you get to the rim. Then pry the bead to the middle of the rim and use bolt cutters or heavy wire cutters to cut the tire bead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

I have good success with c-clamps to beak the bead out of the clincher. Cutting some shoes from hardwood or steel plate helps. The rubber can become bonded enough to require a chisel to break free. By all means, be as kind to the rim as possible

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:45 pm:

.....-clamps to BREAK the bead....



Sorry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

Lol Richard - honestly I read through 99% of typos. Most of the time if you don't post a correction I will never notice it was wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

I place my tires in a large bench vice and tighten it down. The jaws are just next to the rim. I rotate the tire around and break it loose by rocking the the rim back and forth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

Oh...Take the tire off the car first it's easier to lift into the vise that way.

(Vise not Vice like in my other post.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:07 pm:

I wouldn't sawsall because I'd want to try to save the tubes. From everything I read here, modern tubes aren't all that great!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:09 pm:

Also, stop the motor and get out of the car. Just kidding. I think some of us just speak "Shop Talk" here and most of us understand it. However some speak so eloquently and correctly I almost feel I need a suit and tie to visit the forum.

It is for all of us.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:20 pm:

I did the sawzall treatment on some rock-hard old tires I had, it was still a tough job getting them off.

If you accidently cut into the rim, a few passes with the Mig welder and some grinding of the welds takes care of it - don't ask me how I know....

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:36 pm:

Two or three of these, in jumbo size, will do the trick for you, and not even scratch the paint:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:37 pm:

I shaped a piece of hardwood to the contour of the rim long enough to get 3 C-clamps spaced evenly over a 12" space and cranked them down. I then move the set up over to the adjacent 12" space and do the same. Sometimes you have to work it all the way around and other times the tire will break free all around once you make the initial separation. I then use bolt cutters to cut the clincher bead in a few places and can usually work the inner tube out in one piece at that point.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 01:46 pm:

I like the bolt cutter idea, wish I had thought of that before I grabbed the sawzall! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 02:08 pm:

Dynamite will work if properly applied. Fire is an alternative. I guess I'd go with the vise and bolt cutters. If the tubes are junk then a sawzall or hacksaw.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 02:17 pm:

Break the bead by putting the tire in a vice. Scrunch it down then move over and take another bite. Once it's broken all around use tire spoons to get it off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 03:41 pm:

I do exactly what Terry describes above, only I use a Japanese dovetail pull saw. Ridiculously sharp (wear heavy gloves) it goes through hardened rubber like a knife through warm butter and zero chance of damaging the rim like a sawz-all would because it is easy to control.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 07:18 pm:

I used a sawzall on two of mine, I just stayed about 3/4 inch away from the rim and sawed all the way around the circumference, on both sidewalls. Off came that part, then the beaded part was able to be pulled off almost effortlessly. No rims were damaged in this exercise, and you MAY try this at home! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Saniewski Denville NJ on Friday, March 27, 2015 - 08:26 pm:

I put my wheels next to the boiler in the basement for a week. It was really cold here in New Jersey last month. They softened up pretty good, enough to get them off, and put in new tubes and put the tires back on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 03:45 am:

Paul, an older fellow I was helping out with bits, sawed four old, hard tyres off, and cut through 3 excellent Olympic butyl rubber tubes!!!!

I learned from his mistake and salvaged 3 red rubber Goodyear tubes which are far superior to anything available today, so whatever way you choose to remove them, try to save the tubes in case they are really worth having.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 07:51 am:

Tims method works great, I did the same in the past.


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