Coolest fender repair of all time

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Coolest fender repair of all time
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 04:28 pm:

I spent yesterday out in eastern Montana listing and taking photos for an auction we have scheduled there in late May. Going through the old buggy frames and other stuff dumped over the bank years back I came across this front fender. Isn't this just the best repair you've ever seen? All those rivets.





Times were hard, people took care of what they had. I wanted to just throw it in the back of the car and bring it home but can't do that, everything has to go through the auction. Steal one thing you're a thief.

It has probably laid on the old buggy for close to a hundred years. There are remnants of half a dozen buggies and wagons out in front of the dugout that they lived in until they got the house built.



Here is what is left of the dugout they lived in.
It's hard to see much with all the brush that's grown up there.



This is the big house they built when the farm became a success. Shipped in on the railroad from Sears & Roebuck as a kit. Lots of the homestead houses were like this. It is a nice old house.

With a little clean up and paint it would be very livable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 05:47 pm:

Strange place to keep your spare tires though! ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 07:23 pm:

Wind! Shingles were probably coming loose on the lower edges of the roof. The reason you have an estate auction is because somebody died. Many times they were sick before they died and couldn't do all the things they could do when they were young, like crawl up a ladder and fix the roof.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 08:04 pm:

Those fenders should be in MTFCA museum---along with other item of similar nature. Would be an interesting historical display of how folks improvised. Enjoyed seeing you in Chick this year. Regards, TDE


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 09:04 pm:

It will hopefully be in my museum. I don't think the other museum cares much about things like this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Mokelumne Hill, Calif. on Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 09:29 pm:

I think that fender needs another patch....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:06 pm:

I was very pleased to see this patch. I have admired the fixes used on cars back in the day. Here are some less impressive ones I have seen.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:10 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:28 pm:


Those patches made me think of this fender I saw at an auction a few years ago. It could have used a pretty big patch like the one in Stan's first picture. Money was scarce for a lot of folks, and they had to make do with what they had. Working on the old house I find lots of places where Grandpa used cut up cans for flashing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 01:07 pm:

A little drift, but I sure know what you mean about making do with what they had Steve. During winter time when there wasn't much to do on the ranch, my grandfather would spend time straightening old bent nails to re-use repairing fruit boxes and drying trays. Nothing that could be re-used was discarded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 02:02 pm:

I guess some of this "never throw anything away" has rubbed off on me. I did make this turtle deck patch for my rusty roadster from a splash apron that had sacrificed it's lower couple of inches to the Idaho soil. I added the bead to match.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

This old school memtality is the driving reason for me to even own a T. As our country fades
into a plastic, everyone-wears-a-helmet, throwaway society, few remember or even noticed these
old-timers and their unsexy ways of taking care of things and repairing as needed. It used to be
when a telephone line rebuilt, new poles and crossarms were stood and the rest of the hardware
swapped over to the new poles. Today, all the hardware is updated and the old line just gets
hauled off to the dump. Nowadays, even finding an actual telephone line is unusual in some
places. It's all underground or done with cel towers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 03:55 pm:

Stan,

Neat patch. Reminds me of the cowl lamp I found with two pieces of wick sewn together so it would be long enough to reach into the font.

Nowadays, we tear down an old building and save the wood. If you pull the nails, it is still very usable. However, I once read that in the old days, they would burn down an old building and sift through the ashes to recover the nails, as that is what was valuable, not the wood. Funny how times change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 04:16 pm:

Speaking of nails and looking at that patch it is probably what they used, just nip them short an peen them over. As far as saving things back in the early sixties my Dad, younger brother and I spent a summer salvaging lumber along with the nails and glass from houses in Akron that were being torn down to make way for an express way. We built a very nice one and a half car garage. My brother was none to pleased with having to straiten all those nails. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 04:23 pm:

Builds character. I was none too happy (at the time) to trudge around the moonscape of
Afghanistan in a furnace with 60lbs. of gear, but it is stuff like that that separates the "men
from the boys". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 04:31 pm:

Could have been left over rivets from mending harnesses that were no longer used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 05:53 pm:

Here's one on our '14 roadster pickup. Been there a while.


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